Browsing by Subject "MASS-SPECTROMETER"

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  • Bressi, M.; Cavalli, F.; Putaud, J.P.; Fröhlich, R.; Petit, J.-E.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Allan, J.D.; Aurela, M.; Berico, M.; Bougiatioti, A.; Bukowiecki, N.; Canonaco, F.; Crenn, V.; Dusanter, S.; Ehn, Mikael; Elsasser, M.; Flentje, H.; Graf, P.; Green, D.C.; Heikkinen, Liine; Hermann, H.; Holzinger, R.; Hueglin, C.; Keernik, H.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kubelová, L.; Lunder, C.; Maasikmets, M.; Makeš, O.; Malaguti, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Nicolas, J.B.; O'Dowd, C.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Schlag, P.; Schwarz, J.; Sciare, J.; Slowik, J.; Sosedova, Y.; Stavroulas, I.; Teinemaa, E.; Via, M.; Vodička, P.; Williams, P.I.; Wiedensohler, A.; Young, D.E.; Zhang, S.; Favez, O.; Minguillón, M.C.; Prevot, A.S.H. (2021)
    Similarities and differences in the submicron atmospheric aerosol chemical composition are analyzed from a unique set of measurements performed at 21 sites across Europe for at least one year. These sites are located between 35 and 62 degrees N and 10 degrees W - 26 degrees E, and represent various types of settings (remote, coastal, rural, industrial, urban). Measurements were all carried out on-line with a 30-min time resolution using mass spectroscopy based instruments known as Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (ACSM) and Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS) and following common measurement guidelines. Data regarding organics, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium concentrations, as well as the sum of them called non-refractory submicron aerosol mass concentration ([NR-PM1]) are discussed. NR-PM1 concentrations generally increase from remote to urban sites. They are mostly larger in the mid-latitude band than in southern and northern Europe. On average, organics account for the major part (36-64%) of NR-PM1 followed by sulfate (12-44%) and nitrate (6-35%). The annual mean chemical composition of NR-PM1 at rural (or regional background) sites and urban background sites are very similar. Considering rural and regional background sites only, nitrate contribution is higher and sulfate contribution is lower in midlatitude Europe compared to northern and southern Europe. Large seasonal variations in concentrations (mu g/m(3)) of one or more components of NR-PM1 can be observed at all sites, as well as in the chemical composition of NR-PM1 (%) at most sites. Significant diel cycles in the contribution to [NR-PM1] of organics, sulfate, and nitrate can be observed at a majority of sites both in winter and summer. Early morning minima in organics in concomitance with maxima in nitrate are common features at regional and urban background sites. Daily variations are much smaller at a number of coastal and rural sites. Looking at NR-PM1 chemical composition as a function of NR-PM1 mass concentration reveals that although organics account for the major fraction of NR-PM1 at all concentration levels at most sites, nitrate contribution generally increases with NR-PM1 mass concentration and predominates when NR-PM1 mass concentrations exceed 40 mu g/m(3) at half of the sites.
  • Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona (2016)
    Evaporation rates of small negatively charged sulfuric acid-ammonia clusters are determined by combining detailed cluster formation simulations with cluster distributions measured in the CLOUD experiment at CERN. The analysis is performed by varying the evaporation rates with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), running cluster formation simulations with each new set of evaporation rates and comparing the obtained cluster distributions to the measurements. In a second set of simulations, the fragmentation of clusters in the mass spectrometer due to energetic collisions is studied by treating also the fragmentation probabilities as unknown parameters and varying them with MCMC. This second set of simulations results in a better fit to the experimental data, suggesting that a large fraction of the observed HSO4- and HSO4-center dot H2SO4 signals may result from fragmentation of larger clusters, most importantly the HSO4-center dot(H2SO4)(2) trimer.
  • Pajunoja, Aki; Lambe, Andrew T.; Hakala, Jani; Rastak, Narges; Cummings, Molly J.; Brogan, James F.; Hao, Liqing; Paramonov, Mikhail; Hong, Juan; Prisle, Nonne L.; Malila, Jussi; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Laaksonen, Ari; Kulmala, Markku; Massoli, Paola; Onasch, Timothy B.; Donahue, Neil M.; Riipinen, Ilona; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Petaja, Tuukka; Virtanen, Annele (2015)
    Aerosol climate effects are intimately tied to interactions with water. Here we combine hygroscopicity measurements with direct observations about the phase of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles to show that water uptake by slightly oxygenated SOA is an adsorption-dominated process under subsaturated conditions, where low solubility inhibits water uptake until the humidity is high enough for dissolution to occur. This reconciles reported discrepancies in previous hygroscopicity closure studies. We demonstrate that the difference in SOA hygroscopic behavior in subsaturated and supersaturated conditions can lead to an effect up to about 30% in the direct aerosol forcinghighlighting the need to implement correct descriptions of these processes in atmospheric models. Obtaining closure across the water saturation point is therefore a critical issue for accurate climate modeling.
  • Massoli, Paola; Stark, Harald; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Mauldin, Roy L.; Yan, Chao; Kimmel, Joel; Misztal, Pawel K.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R. (2018)
    We present measurements of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOMs) detected in the gas phase using a high-resolution time-of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer with nitrate reagent ion (NO3- CIMS). The measurements took place during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS 2013) at a forest site in Alabama, where emissions were dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Primary BVOC emissions were represented by isoprene mixed with various terpenes, making it a unique sampling location compared to previous NO3- CIMS deployments in monoterpene-dominated environments. During SOAS 2013, the NO3- CIMS detected HOMs with oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) ratios between 0.5 and 1.4 originating from both isoprene (C-5) and monoterpenes (C-10) as well as hundreds of additional HOMs with carbon numbers between C-3 and C-20. We used positive matrix factorization (PMF) to deconvolve the complex data set and extract information about classes of HOMs with similar temporal trends. This analysis revealed three isoprene-dominated and three monoterpene-dominated PMF factors. We observed significant amounts of isoprene- and monoterpene-derived organic nitrates (ONs) in most factors. The abundant presence of ONs was consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the importance of NOx-driven chemistry at the site. One of the isoprene-dominated factors had a strong correlation with SO2 plumes likely advected from nearby coal-fired power plants and was dominated by an isoprene derived ON (C5H10N2O8). These results indicate that anthropogenic emissions played a significant role in the formation of low volatility compounds from BVOC emissions in the region.
  • Yli-Juuti, Taina; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Manninen, Hanna E.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kulmala, Markku (2016)
    We analyzed nanoparticle growth during new-particle-formation events based on ten years of measurements carried out at a boreal forest site in Hyytiala, Finland, concentrating on the sub-3 nm particles and the role of sulfuric acid in their growth. Growth rates of 1.5-3 nm diameter particles were determined from ion spectrometer measurements and compared with parameterized sulfuric acid concentration and other atmospheric parameters. The calculated growth rates from sulfuric acid condensation were on average 7.4% of the observed growth rates and the two did not correlate. These suggest that neither sulfuric acid monomer condensation nor coagulation of small sulfuric acid clusters was the primary growth mechanism in these atmospheric conditions. Also no clear sign of organic condensation being the single main growth mechanism was seen. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that several factors have comparative roles in the sub-3 nm growth.
  • Kalivitis, N.; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kouvarakis, G.; Stavroulas, I.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Manninen, Hanna; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Mihalopoulos, N. (2015)
    While cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production associated with atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is thought to be frequent throughout the continental boundary layers, few studies on this phenomenon in marine air exist. Here, based on simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions, CCN properties and aerosol chemical composition, we present the first direct evidence on CCN production resulting from NPF in the eastern Mediterranean atmosphere. We show that condensation of both gaseous sulfuric acid and organic compounds from multiple sources leads to the rapid growth of nucleated particles to CCN sizes in this environment during the summertime. Sub-100 nm particles were found to be substantially less hygroscopic than larger particles during the period with active NPF and growth (the value of kappa was lower by 0.2-0.4 for 60 nm particles compared with 120 nm particles), probably due to enrichment of organic material in the sub-100 nm size range. The aerosol hygroscopicity tended to be at minimum just before the noon and at maximum in the afternoon, which was very likely due to the higher sulfate-to-organic ratios and higher degree of oxidation of the organic material during the afternoon. Simultaneous with the formation of new particles during daytime, particles formed during the previous day or even earlier were growing into the size range relevant to cloud droplet activation, and the particles formed in the atmosphere were possibly mixed with long-range-transported particles.
  • Nielsen, Ingeborg E.; Skov, Henrik; Massling, Andreas; Eriksson, Axel C.; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Junninen, Heikki; Sarnela, Nina; Lange, Robert; Collier, Sonya; Zhang, Qi; Cappa, Christopher D.; Nøjgaard, Jacob K. (2019)
    There are limited measurements of the chemical composition, abundance and sources of atmospheric particles in the High Arctic To address this, we report 93 d of soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) data collected from 20 February to 23 May 2015 at Villum Research Station (VRS) in northern Greenland (81 degrees 36' N). During this period, we observed the Arctic haze phenomenon with elevated PM1 concentrations ranging from an average of 2.3, 2.3 and 3.3 mu g m(-3) in February, March and April, respectively, to 1.2 mu g m(-3) in May. Particulate sulfate (SO42-) accounted for 66 % of the non-refractory PM1 with the highest concentration until the end of April and decreasing in May. The second most abundant species was organic aerosol (OA) (24 %). Both OA and PM1, estimated from the sum of all collected species, showed a marked decrease throughout May in accordance with the polar front moving north, together with changes in aerosol removal processes. The highest refractory black carbon (rBC) concentrations were found in the first month of the campaign, averaging 0.2 mu g m(-3). In March and April, rBC averaged 0.1 mu g m(-3) while decreasing to 0.02 mu g m(-3) in May. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the OA mass spectra yielded three factors: (1) a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor, which was dominated by primary aerosols and accounted for 12 % of OA mass, (2) an Arctic haze organic aerosol (AOA) factor and (3) a more oxygenated marine organic aerosol (MOA) factor. AOA dominated until mid-April (64 %-81 % of OA), while being nearly absent from the end of May and correlated significantly with SO42-, suggesting the main part of that factor is secondary OA. The MOA emerged late at the end of March, where it increased with solar radiation and reduced sea ice extent and dominated OA for the rest of the campaign until the end of May (24 %-74 % of OA), while AOA was nearly absent. The highest O/C ratio (0.95) and S/C ratio (0.011) was found for MOA. Our data support the current understanding that Arctic aerosols are highly influenced by secondary aerosol formation and receives an important contribution from marine emissions during Arctic spring in remote High Arctic areas. In view of a changing Arctic climate with changing sea-ice extent, biogenic processes and corresponding source strengths, highly time-resolved data are needed in order to elucidate the components dominating aerosol concentrations and enhance the understanding of the processes taking place.
  • Saarikoski, S.; Reyes, F.; Vázquez, Y.; Tagle, M.; Timonen, H.; Aurela, M.; Carbone, S.; Worsnop, D.R.; Hillamo, R.; Oyola, P. (2019)
    Chemical characteristics and the sources of submicron particles (<1 mu m in diameter) were investigated in Valle Alegre, the coastal area of Central Chile. The chemical composition of particles was studied by using a Soot particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer. Submicron particles were dominated by organics (42% of mass) and sulfate (39% of mass) while the mass fractions of ammonium, nitrate and black carbon were much smaller (13, 2 and 4% of mass, respectively). Additionally, several metals (V, Zn, Fe, Cd, Cu, K, Na and Mg) were detected in submicron particles and also some of their inorganic salts (e.g. NaCl+, MgCl2+, CaCl2+, KCl+ and KNO3+). The sources of particles were examined by using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Organic aerosol (OA) was divided into five factors by using PMF; hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), semi-volatile OA (SV-OOA) and marine oxygenated OOA (MOOA), Oxygenated factors (LV-OOA; SV-OOA and MOOA) comprised 75% of total OA with LV-OOA being the dominant factor (38% of OA). Sulfate had two major sources in Valle Alegre; similar to 70% of sulfate was related to anthropogenic sources through the oxidation of gas phase SO2 whereas similar to 24% of sulfate was associated with biogenic origin related to the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide in the marine environment. Regarding total submicron particle mass (campaign-average 9.5 mu g m(-3)), the contribution of anthropogenic sources was at least as large as that of biogenic origin.
  • Carbone, S.; Onasch, T.; Saarikoski, S.; Timonen, H.; Saarnio, K.; Sueper, D.; Ronkko, T.; Pirjola, L.; Häyrinen, A.; Worsnop, D.; Hillamo, R. (2015)
    A method to detect and quantify mass concentrations of trace metals on soot particles by the Aerodyne soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was developed and evaluated in this study. The generation of monodisperse Regal black (RB) test particles with trace amounts of 13 different metals (Na, Al, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Ba) allowed for the determination of the relative ionization efficiency of each metal relative to black carbon (RIEmeas). The observed RIEmeas/RIEtheory values were larger than unity for Na, Rb, Ca, Sr and Ba due to thermal surface ionization (TSI) on the surface of the laser-heated RB particles. Values closer to unity were obtained for the transition metals Zn, Cu, V and Cr. Mn, Fe, and Ni presented the lowest RIEmeas/RIEtheory ratios and highest deviation from unity. The latter discrepancy is unexplained; however it may be related to problems with our calibration method and/or the formation of metal complexes that were not successfully quantified. The response of the metals to the laser power was investigated and the results indicated that a minimum pump laser current of 0.6 A was needed in order to vaporize the metals and the refractory black carbon (rBC). Isotopic patterns of metals were resolved from high-resolution mass spectra, and the mass-weighted size distributions for each individual metal ion were obtained using the high-resolution particle time-of-flight (HR-PToF) method. The RIEmeas values obtained in this study were applied to the data of emission measurements in a heavy-fuel-oil-fired heating station. Emission measurements revealed a large number of trace metals, including evidence for metal oxides and metallic salts, such as vanadium sulfate, calcium sulfate, iron sulfate and barium sulfate, which were identified in the SP-AMS high-resolution mass spectra. SP-AMS measurements of Ba, Fe, and V agreed with ICP-MS analyzed filter samples within a factor of 2 when emitted rBC mass loadings were elevated.
  • Frege, Carla; Bianchi, Federico; Molteni, Ugo; Trostl, Jasmin; Junninen, Heikki; Henne, Stephan; Sipilä, Mikko; Herrmann, Erik; Rossi, Michel J.; Kulmala, Markku; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Dommen, Josef (2017)
    The ion composition at high altitude (3454 m a.s.l.) was measured with an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer (APi-TOF) during a period of 9 months, from August 2013 to April 2014. The negative mass spectra were dominated by the ions of sulfuric, nitric, malonic, and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as well as SO5. The most prominent positive ion peaks were from amines. The other cations were mainly organic compounds clustered with a nitrogen-containing ion, which could be either NH4+ or an aminium. Occasionally the positive spectra were characterized by groups of compounds each differing by a methylene group. In the negative spectrum, sulfuric acid was always observed during clear sky conditions following the diurnal cycle of solar irradiation. On many occasions we also saw a high signal of sulfuric acid during nighttime when clusters up to the tetramer were observed. A plausible reason for these events could be evaporation from particles at low relative humidity. A remarkably strong correlation between the signals of SO5 and CH3SO3- was observed for the full measurement period. The presence of these two ions during both the day and the night suggests a non-photochemical channel of formation which is possibly linked to halogen chemistry. Halogenated species, especially Br- and IO3-, were frequently observed in air masses that originated mainly from the Atlantic Ocean and occasionally from continental areas based on back trajectory analyses. We found I2O5 clustered with an ion, a species that was proposed from laboratory and modeling studies. All halogenated ions exhibited an unexpected diurnal behavior with low values during daytime. New particle formation (NPF) events were observed and characterized by (1) highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) and low sulfuric acid or (2) ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters. We present characteristic spectra for each of these two event types based on 26 nucleation episodes. The mass spectrum of the ammonia-sulfuric acid nucleation event compares very well with laboratory measurements reported from the CLOUD chamber. A source receptor analysis indicates that NPF events at the Jungfraujoch take place within a restricted period of time of 24-48 h after air masses have had contact with the boundary layer. This time frame appears to be crucial to reach an optimal oxidation state and concentration of organic molecules necessary to facilitate nucleation.
  • Hao, Liqing; Garmash, Olga; Ehn, Mikael; Miettinen, Pasi; Massoli, Paola; Mikkonen, Santtu; Jokinen, Tuija; Roldin, Pontus; Aalto, Pasi; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Virtanen, Annele (2018)
    Characterizing aerosol chemical composition in response to meteorological changes and atmospheric chemistry is important to gain insights into new particle formation mechanisms. A BAECC (Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate) campaign was conducted during the spring 2014 at the SMEAR II station (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Aerosol Relations) in Finland. The particles were characterized by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). A PBL (planetary boundary layer) dilution model was developed to assist interpreting the measurement results. Right before nucleation events, the mass concentrations of organic and sulfate aerosol species were both decreased rapidly along with the growth of PBL heights. However, the mass fraction of sulfate aerosol of the total aerosol mass was increased, in contrast to a decrease for the organic mass fraction. Meanwhile, an increase in LVOOA (low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol) mass fraction of the total organic mass was observed, in distinct comparison to a reduction of SVOOA (semi-volatile OOA) mass fraction. Our results demonstrate that, at the beginning of nucleation events, the observed sulfate aerosol mass was mainly driven by vertical turbulent mixing of sulfate-rich aerosols between the residual layer and the newly formed boundary layer, while the condensation of sulfuric acid (SA) played a minor role in interpreting the measured sulfate mass concentration. For the measured organic aerosols, their temporal profiles were mainly driven by dilution from PBL development, organic aerosol mixing in different boundary layers and/or partitioning of organic vapors, but accurate measurements of organic vapor concentrations and characterization on the spatial aerosol chemical composition are required. In general, the observed aerosol particles by AMS are subjected to joint effects of PBL dilution, atmospheric chemistry and aerosol mixing in different boundary layers. During aerosol growth periods in the nighttime, the mass concentrations of organic aerosols and organic nitrate aerosols were both increased. The increase in SVOOA mass correlated well with the calculated increase in condensed HOMs' (highly oxygenated organic molecules) mass. To our knowledge, our results are the first atmospheric observations showing a connection between increase in SVOOA and condensed HOMs during the nighttime.
  • Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Buchholz, Angela; Ylisirniö, Arttu; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Virtanen, Annele; Yli-Juuti, Taina (2020)
    The volatility distribution of the organic compounds present in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) at different conditions is a key quantity that has to be captured in order to describe SOA dynamics accurately. The development of the Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) and its coupling to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS; collectively FIGAERO-CIMS) has enabled near-simultaneous sampling of the gas and particle phases of SOA through thermal desorption of the particles. The thermal desorption data have been recently shown to be interpretable as a volatility distribution with the use of the positive matrix factorization (PMF) method. Similarly, volatility distributions can be inferred from isothermal particle evaporation experiments when the particle size change measurements are analyzed with process-modeling techniques. In this study, we compare the volatility distributions that are retrieved from FIGAERO-CIMS and particle size change measurements during isothermal particle evaporation with process-modeling techniques. We compare the volatility distributions at two different relative humidities (RHs) and two oxidation conditions. In high-RH conditions, where particles are in a liquid state, we show that the volatility distributions derived via the two ways are similar within a reasonable assumption of uncertainty in the effective saturation mass concentrations that are derived from FIGAERO-CIMS data. In dry conditions, we demonstrate that the volatility distributions are comparable in one oxidation condition, and in the other oxidation condition, the volatility distribution derived from the PMF analysis shows considerably more high-volatility matter than the volatility distribution inferred from particle size change measurements. We also show that the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher equation together with a recent glass transition temperature parametrization for organic compounds and PMF-derived volatility distribution estimates are consistent with the observed isothermal evaporation under dry conditions within the reported uncertainties. We conclude that the FIGAERO-CIMS measurements analyzed with the PMF method are a promising method for inferring the volatility distribution of organic compounds, but care has to be taken when the PMF factors are analyzed. Future process-modeling studies about SOA dynamics and properties could benefit from simultaneous FIGAERO-CIMS measurements.
  • Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ickes, Luisa; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kuerten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tome, Antonio; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E.; Curtius, Joachim (2016)
    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208-292K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 110(6) to 110(9)cm(-3), and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphuric acid clusters, detected by an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. APi-TOF measurements of the sulphuric acid ion cluster distributions (H2SO4)HSO4 with i = 0, 1, ..., 10) show qualitative agreement with the SAWNUC ion cluster distributions. Remaining differences between the measured and modeled distributions are most likely due to fragmentation in the APi-TOF. The CLOUD results are in good agreement with previously measured cluster binding energies and show the SAWNUC model to be a good representation of ion-induced and neutral binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water clusters in the middle and upper troposphere.
  • He, Xu-Cheng; Iyer, Siddharth; Sipila, Mikko; Ylisirniö, Arttu; Peltola, Maija; Kontkanen, Jenni; Baalbaki, Rima; Simon, Mario; Kuerten, Andreas; Tham, Yee Jun; Pesonen, Janne; Ahonen, Lauri R.; Amanatidis, Stavros; Amorim, Antonio; Baccarini, Andrea; Beck, Lisa; Bianchi, Federico; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Dexian; Chiu, Randall; Curtius, Joachim; Dada, Lubna; Dias, Antonio; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; El Haddad, Imad; Finkenzeller, Henning; Fischer, Lukas; Heinritzi, Martin; Hofbauer, Victoria; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Changhyuk; Koenig, Theodore K.; Kubecka, Jakub; Kvashnin, Aleksandr; Lamkaddam, Houssni; Lee, Chuan Ping; Leiminger, Markus; Li, Zijun; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Xiao, Mao; Marten, Ruby; Nie, Wei; Onnela, Antti; Partoll, Eva; Petäjä, Tuukka; Salo, Vili-Taneli; Schuchmann, Simone; Steiner, Gerhard; Stolzenburg, Dominik; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tauber, Christian; Tome, Antonio; Vaisanen, Olli; Vazquez-Pufleau, Miguel; Volkamer, Rainer; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wang, Mingyi; Wang, Yonghong; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wu, Yusheng; Yan, Chao; Ye, Qing; Lehtinen, Kari; Nieminen, Tuomo; Manninen, Hanna E.; Rissanen, Matti; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Baltensperger, Urs; Hansel, Armin; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Flagan, Richard C.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kurten, Theo; Kulmala, Markku (2021)
    Ions enhance the formation rate of atmospheric aerosol particles, which play an important role in Earth's radiative balance. Ion-induced nucleation involves the stepwise accretion of neutral monomers onto a molecular cluster containing an ion, which helps to stabilize the cluster against evaporation. Although theoretical frameworks exist to calculate the collision rate coefficients between neutral molecules and ions, they need to be experimentally confirmed, ideally under atmospherically relevant conditions of around 1000 ion pairs cm(-3). Here, in experiments performed under atmospheric conditions in the CERN CLOUD chamber, we have measured the collision rate coefficients between neutral iodic acid (HIO3) monomers and charged iodic acid molecular clusters containing up to 11 iodine atoms. Three methods were analytically derived to calculate ion-polar molecule collision rate coefficients. After evaluation with a kinetic model, the 50% appearance time method is found to be the most robust. The measured collision rate coefficient, averaged over all iodine clusters, is (2.4 +/- 0.8)x10(-9 )cm(3) s(-1), which is close to the expectation from the surface charge capture theory.
  • Elm, Jonas; Passananti, Monica; Kurten, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna (2017)
    Recent experimental evidence suggests that diamines can enhance atmospheric new particle formation more efficiently compared to monoamines such as dimethylamine Here we investigate the molecular interactions between sulfuric acid (sa) and the diamine putrescine (put) using computational methods. The molecular structure of up to four sulfuric acid molecules and up to four putrescine molecules were obtained, at the omega B97X-D/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. We utilized a domain local pair natural orbital coupled cluster method (DLPNO-CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ) to obtain highly accurate binding energies of the clusters. We find that the (sa)(1-4)(put)(1-4) clusters show more ionic character than clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine (dma) by readily forming several sulfate ions in the cluster. To estimate the stability of the clusters, we calculate the evaporation rates and compare them to ESI-APi-TOF measurements. Using the atmospheric cluster dynamics code (ACDC), we simulate and compare the new particle formation rates between the (sa)(1-4)(put)(1-4) and (sa),(1-4)(dma)(1-4) cluster systems. We find that putrescine significantly enhances the formation of new particles compared to dimethylamine. Our findings suggest that a large range of amines with different basicity is capable of explaining various regions of the observed new particle formation events. These results indicate that diamines, or related compounds with high basicity, might be important species in forming the initial cluster with sulfuric acid and subsequently more abundant amines with lower basicity can assist in the new particle formation process by attaching to the sulfuric acid-diamine nucleus.
  • Quéléver, Lauriane L. J.; Kristensen, Kasper; Jensen, Louise Normann; Rosati, Bernadette; Teiwes, Ricky; Dällenbach, Kaspar; Peräkylä, Otso; Roldin, Pontus; Bossi, Rossana; Pedersen, Henrik B.; Glasius, Marianne; Bilde, Merete; Ehn, Mikael (2019)
    Highly oxygenated organic molecules (HOMs) are important contributors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and new-particle formation (NPF) in the boreal atmosphere. This newly discovered class of molecules is efficiently formed from atmospheric oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as monoterpenes, through a process called autoxidation. This process, in which peroxy-radical intermediates isomerize to allow addition of molecular oxygen, is expected to be highly temperature-dependent. Here, we studied the dynamics of HOM formation during a -pinene ozonolysis experiments performed at three different temperatures, 20, 0 and - 15 degrees C, in the Aarhus University Research on Aerosol (AURA) chamber. We found that the HOM formation, under our experimental conditions (50 ppb alpha-pinene and 100 ppb ozone), decreased considerably at lower temperature, with molar yields dropping by around a factor of 50 when experiments were performed at 0 degrees C, compared to 20 degrees C. At -15 degrees C, the HOM signals were already close to the detection limit of the nitrate-based chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer used for measuring gas-phase HOMs. Surprisingly, comparing spectra measured at 0 and 20 degrees C, ratios between HOMs of different oxidation levels, e.g., the typical HOM products C10H14O7, C10H14O9, and C10H14O11, changed considerably less than the total HOM yields. More oxidized species have undergone more isomerization steps; yet, at lower temperature, they did not decrease more than the less oxidized species. One possible explanation is that the primary rate-limiting steps forming these HOMs occur before the products become oxygenated enough to be detected by our CI-APi-TOF (i.e., typically seven or more oxygen atoms). The strong temperature dependence of HOM formation was observed under temperatures highly relevant to the boreal forest, but the exact magnitude of this effect in the atmosphere will be much more complex: the fate of peroxy radicals is a competition between autoxidation (influenced by temperature and VOC type) and bimolecular termination pathways (influenced mainly by concentration of reaction partners). While the temperature influence is likely smaller in the boreal atmosphere than in our chamber, both the magnitude and complexity of this effect clearly deserve more consideration in future studies in order to estimate the ultimate role of HOMs on SOA and NPF under different atmospheric conditions.
  • Hong, Juan; Äijälä, Mikko; Häme, Silja A. K.; Hao, Liqing; Duplissy, Jonathan; Heikkinen, Liine M.; Nie, Wei; Mikkilä, Jyri; Kulmala, Markku; Prisle, Nonne L.; Virtanen, Annele; Ehn, Mikael; Paasonen, Pauli; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Riipinen, Ilona; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti (2017)
    The volatility distribution of secondary organic aerosols that formed and had undergone aging - i. e., the particle mass fractions of semi-volatile, low-volatility and extremely low volatility organic compounds in the particle phase - was characterized in a boreal forest environment of Hyytiala, southern Finland. This was done by interpreting field measurements using a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) with a kinetic evaporation model. The field measurements were performed during April and May 2014. On average, 40% of the organics in particles were semi-volatile, 34% were low-volatility organics and 26% were extremely low volatility organics. The model was, however, very sensitive to the vaporization enthalpies assumed for the organics (Delta H-VAP). The best agreement between the observed and modeled temperature dependence of the evaporation was obtained when effective vaporization enthalpy values of 80 kJ mol(-1) were assumed. There are several potential reasons for the low effective enthalpy value, including molecular decomposition or dissociation that might occur in the particle phase upon heating, mixture effects and compound-dependent uncertainties in the mass accommodation coefficient. In addition to the VTDMA-based analysis, semi-volatile and low-volatility organic mass fractions were independently determined by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) data. The factor separation was based on the oxygenation levels of organics, specifically the relative abundance of mass ions at m/z 43 (f43) and m/z 44 (f44). The mass fractions of these two organic groups were compared against the VTDMA-based results. In general, the best agreement between the VTDMA results and the PMF-derived mass fractions of organics was obtained when Delta H-VAP D 80 kJ mol(-1) was set for all organic groups in the model, with a linear correlation coefficient of around 0.4. However, this still indicates that only about 16% (R-2)of the variation can be explained by the linear regression between the results from these two methods. The prospect of determining of extremely low volatility organic aerosols (ELVOAs) from AMS data using the PMF analysis should be assessed in future studies.
  • Riva, Matthieu; Rantala, Pekka; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Peräkylä, Otso; Zhang, Yanjun; Heikkinen, Liine; Garmash, Olga; Yan, Chao; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael (2019)
    The impact of aerosols on climate and air quality remains poorly understood due to multiple factors. One of the current limitations is the incomplete understanding of the contribution of oxygenated products, generated from the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), to aerosol formation. Indeed, atmospheric gaseous chemical processes yield thousands of (highly) oxygenated species, spanning a wide range of chemical formulas, functional groups and, consequently, volatilities. While recent mass spectrometric developments have allowed extensive on-line detection of a myriad of oxygenated organic species, playing a central role in atmospheric chemistry, the detailed quantification and characterization of this diverse group of compounds remains extremely challenging. To address this challenge, we evaluated the capability of current state-of-the-art mass spectrometers equipped with different chemical ionization sources to detect the oxidation products formed from alpha-Pinene ozonolysis under various conditions. Five different mass spectrometers were deployed simultaneously for a chamber study. Two chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometers (CI-APi-TOF) with nitrate and amine reagent ion chemistries and an iodide chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-CIMS) were used. Additionally, a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF 8000) and a new "vocus" PTR-TOF were also deployed. In the current study, we compared around 1000 different compounds between each of the five instruments, with the aim of determining which oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) the different methods were sensitive to and identifying regions where two or more instruments were able to detect species with similar molecular formulae. We utilized a large variability in conditions (including different VOCs, ozone, NOx and OH scavenger concentrations) in our newly constructed atmospheric simulation chamber for a comprehensive correlation analysis between all instruments. This analysis, combined with estimated concentrations for identified molecules in each instrument, yielded both expected and surprising results. As anticipated based on earlier studies, the PTR instruments were the only ones able to measure the precursor VOC, the iodide TOF-CIMS efficiently detected many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) with three to five oxygen atoms, and the nitrate CI-APi-TOF was mainly sensitive to highly oxygenated organic (O > 5) molecules (HOMs). In addition, the vocus showed good agreement with the iodide TOF-CIMS for the SVOC, including a range of organonitrates. The amine CI-APi-TOF agreed well with the nitrate CI-APi-TOF for HOM dimers. However, the loadings in our experiments caused the amine reagent ion to be considerably depleted, causing nonlinear responses for monomers. This study explores and highlights both benefits and limitations of currently available chemical ionization mass spectrometry instrumentation for characterizing the wide variety of OVOCs in the atmosphere. While specifically shown for the case of alpha-Pinene ozonolysis, we expect our general findings to also be valid for a wide range of other VOC-oxidant systems. As discussed in this study, no single instrument configuration can be deemed better or worse than the others, as the optimal instrument for a particular study ultimately depends on the specific target of the study.
  • Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Roldin, Pontus; Duplissy, Jonathan; Rondo, Linda; Troestl, Jasmin; Slowik, Jay G.; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Kuerten, Andreas; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Kirkby, Jasper; Petäjä, Tuukka; Baltensperger, Urs; Boy, Michael; Curtius, Joachim; Flagan, Richard C.; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Stratmann, Frank (2017)
    Evaporation of sulfuric acid from particles can be important in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus. However, the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of H2SO4 to bisulfate ions, which is the one of the fundamental parameters controlling the evaporation of sulfur particles, is not well constrained. In this study we explore the volatility of sulfate particles at very low relative humidity. We measured the evaporation of sulfur particles versus temperature and relative humidity in the CLOUD chamber at CERN. We modelled the observed sulfur particle shrinkage with the ADCHAM model. Based on our model results, we conclude that the sulfur particle shrinkage is mainly governed by H2SO4 and potentially to some extent by SO3 evaporation. We found that the equilibrium constants for the dissociation of H2SO4 to HSO4-(KH2SO4) and the dehydration of H2SO4 to SO3 ((x) K-SO3) are K H2SO4 = 2-4 x 10(9) mol kg(-1) and (x) K SO3 >= 1.4 x 10(10) at 288.8 +/- 5 K.
  • Keskinen, Helmi-Marja; Joutsensaari, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Schobesberger, S.; Gysel, M.; Riccobono, F.; Slowik, J. G.; Bianchi, F.; Yli-Juuti, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Rondo, L.; Breitenlechner, M.; Kupc, A.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dunne, E. M.; Downard, A. J.; Ehrhart, S.; Franchin, A.; Kajos, M. K.; Kirkby, J.; Kuerten, A.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Praplan, A.; Santos, F. D.; Schallhart, S.; Sipilä, M.; Stozhkov, Y.; Tome, A.; Vaattovaara, P.; Wimmer, D.; Prevot, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Weingartner, E.; Viisanen, Y.; Riipinen, I.; Hansel, A.; Curtius, J.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Baltensperger, U.; Wex, H.; Stratmann, F.; Laaksonen, A. (2013)