Browsing by Subject "MATERNAL EDUCATION"

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  • Stolt, Suvi; Savini, Silvia; Guarini, Annalisa; Caselli, Maria Cristina; Matomäki, Jaakko; Lapinleimu, Helena; Haataja, Leena; Lehtonen, Liisa; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Sansavini, Alessandra (2017)
    This cross-linguistic study investigated whether the native language has any influence on lexical composition among Italian (N = 125) and Finnish (N = 116) very preterm (born at
  • Stolt, Suvi; Korja, Riikka; Matomaki, Jaakko; Lapinleimu, Helena; Haataja, Leena; Lehtonen, Liisa (2014)
    Background: It is not clearly understood how the quality of early mother-child interaction influences language development in very-low-birth-weight children (VLBW). Aims: We aim to analyze associations between early language and the quality of mother-child interaction, and, the predictive value of the features of early mother-child interaction on language development at 24 months of corrected age in VLBW children. Study design: A longitudinal prospective follow-up study design was used. Methods: The participants were 28 VLBW children and 34 full-term controls. Language development was measured using different methods at 6, 12 and at 24 months of age. The quality of mother-child interaction was assessed using PC-ERA method at 6 and at 12 months of age. Results: Associations between the features of early interaction and language development were different in the groups of VLBW and full-term children. There were no significant correlations between the features of mother-child interaction and language skills when measured at the same age in the VLBW group. Significant longitudinal correlations were detected in the VLBW group especially if the quality of early interactions was measured at six months and language skills at 2 years of age. However, when the predictive value of the features of early interactions for later poor language performance was analyzed separately, the features of early interaction predicted language skills in the VLBW group only weakly. Conclusions: The biological factors may influence on the language development more in the VLBW children than in the full-term children. The results also underline the role of maternal and dyadic factors in early interactions. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Latvala, Antti; Sugawara, Masumi; Tanaka, Mami; Matsumoto, Satoko; Freitas, Duarte L.; Maia, Jose Antonio; Knafo-Noam, Ariel; Mankuta, David; Abramson, Lior; Ji, Fuling; Ning, Feng; Pang, Zengchang; Rebato, Esther; Saudino, Kimberly J.; Cutler, Tessa L.; Hopper, John L.; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; Almqvist, Catarina; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E.; Mack, Thomas M.; Nelson, Tracy L.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Sung, Joohon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Jooyeon; Lee, Sooji; Llewellyn, Clare H.; Fisher, Abigail; Medda, Emanuela; Nistico, Lorenza; Toccaceli, Virgilia; Baker, Laura A.; Tuvblad, Catherine; Corley, Robin P.; Huibregtse, Brooke M.; Derom, Catherine A.; Vlietinck, Robert F.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Burt, S. Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L.; Silberg, Judy L.; Maes, Hermine H.; Krueger, Robert F.; McGue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Gatz, Margaret; Butler, David A.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Brandt, Ingunn; Nilsen, Thomas S.; Harden, K. Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.; Franz, Carol E.; Kremen, William S.; Lyons, Michael J.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E. M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Oncel, Sevgi Y.; Aliev, Fazil; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Turkheimer, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret; Srensen, Thorkild I. A.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri (2020)
    Genetic factors explain a major proportion of human height variation, but differences in mean stature have also been found between socio-economic categories suggesting a possible effect of environment. By utilizing a classical twin design which allows decomposing the variation of height into genetic and environmental components, we tested the hypothesis that environmental variation in height is greater in offspring of lower educated parents. Twin data from 29 cohorts including 65,978 complete twin pairs with information on height at ages 1 to 69 years and on parental education were pooled allowing the analyses at different ages and in three geographic-cultural regions (Europe, North America and Australia, and East Asia). Parental education mostly showed a positive association with offspring height, with significant associations in mid-childhood and from adolescence onwards. In variance decomposition modeling, the genetic and environmental variance components of height did not show a consistent relation to parental education. A random-effects meta-regression analysis of the aggregate-level data showed a trend towards greater shared environmental variation of height in low parental education families. In conclusion, in our very large dataset from twin cohorts around the globe, these results provide only weak evidence for the study hypothesis.
  • Stolt, Suvi; Klippi, Anu; Launonen, Kaisa; Munck, Petriina; Lehtonen, Liisa; Lapinleimu, Helena; Haataja, Leena; the PIPARI Study Group (2007)
    "This paper focuses on the aspects of the lexicon in 66 prematurely born very-low-birth-weight and 87 full-term Finnish children at 2;0, studied using the Finnish version of the MacArthur Communicative Developmental Inventory. The groups did not differ in vocabulary size. Furthermore, the female advantage in vocabulary size was not seen in preterm children. The overall shapes of the trajectories for the main lexical categories as a function of vocabulary size were highly similar in both groups and followed those described in the literature. However, there were significant differences in the percentage of nouns and grammatical function words between the two groups. The results suggest that prematurity 'cuts off' the female advantage in vocabulary development. Furthermore, it also seems that there are differences between prematurely born and full-term children in the composition of the lexicon at 2;0. The findings support the universal sequence in the development of lexical categories."