Browsing by Subject "MDS"

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  • Cremers, Eline M. P.; de Witte, Theo; de Wreede, Liesbeth; Eikema, Diderik-Jan; Koster, Linda; van Biezen, Anja; Finke, Jurgen; Socie, Gerard; Beelen, Dietrich; Maertens, Johan; Nagler, Arnon; Kobbe, Guido; Ziagkos, Dimitris; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Sierra, Jorge; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ljungman, Per; Beguin, Yves; Ozkurt, Zubeyde Nur; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles; Jindra, Pavel; Robin, Marie; Kröger, Nicolaus (2019)
    Most myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)-patients receive multiple red blood cell transfusions (RBCT). Transfusions may cause iron-related toxicity and mortality, influencing outcome after allogeneic HSCT. This prospective non-interventional study evaluated 222 MDS and CMML patients undergoing HSCT. Overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), non-relapse mortality (NRM), and relapse incidence (RI) at 36 months were 52%, 44%, 25%, and 31%, respectively. Age, percentage of marrow blasts and severe comorbidities impacted OS. RFS was significantly associated with RBCT burden prior to HSCT (HR: 1.7; p = .02). High ferritin levels had a significant negative impact on OS and RI, but no impact on NRM. Administration of iron chelation therapy prior to HSCT did not influence the outcome, but early iron reduction after HSCT (started before 6 months) improved RFS significantly after transplantation (56% in the control group vs. 90% in the treated group, respectively; p = .04). This study illustrates the impact of RBCT and related parameters on HSCT-outcome. Patients with an expected prolonged survival after transplantation may benefit from early iron reduction therapy after transplantation.
  • Garderet, Laurent; Ziagkos, Dimitris; Van Biezen, Anja; Iacobelli, Simona; Finke, Juergen; Maertens, Johan; Volin, Liisa; Ljungman, Per; Chevallier, Patrice; Passweg, Jakob; Schaap, Nicolaas; Beelen, Dietrich; Nagler, Arnon; Blaise, Didier; Poire, Xavier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Lenhoff, Stig; Craddock, Charles; Schots, Rik; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Sanz, Jaime; Jindra, Pavel; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Robin, Marie; Kroeger, Nicolaus (2018)
    The deletion (5q) karyotype (del [5q]) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is the most common karyotypic abnormality in de novo MDS. An increased number of blasts and additional karyotypic abnormalities (del [al]+) are associated with a poor outcome. We analyzed the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) in patients suffering from MDS with only del (5q) or del (5q)+. A total of 162 patients, of median age 54 years (range, 9 to 73), having MDS and del (5q) abnormalities received HCT from identical siblings (n = 87) or unrelated donors (n = 75). The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality and relapse incidence at 4 years was 29% (95% CI, 22 to 36) and 46% (95% CI, 38 to 54), whereas the estimated 4 year survival, relapse-free and overall, was 25% (95% CI, 18 to 33) and 30% (95% CI, 23 to 38), respectively. In a multivariate analysis patients with del (5q) and a blast excess displayed poorer survival (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.44 to 3.93; P
  • Tobiasson, Magnus; Abdulkadir, Hani; Lennartsson, Andreas; Katayama, Shintaro; Marabita, Francesco; De Paepe, Ayla; Karimi, Mohsen; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Grovdal, Michael; Jansson, Monika; Ben Azenkoud, Asmaa; Corddedu, Lina; Lehmann, Soren; Ekwall, Karl; Kere, Juha; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Ungerstedt, Johanna (2017)
    Azacitidine (Aza) is first-line treatment for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), although its precise mechanism of action is unknown. We performed the first study to globally evaluate the epigenetic effects of Aza on MDS bone marrow progenitor cells assessing gene expression (RNA seq), DNA methylation (Illumina 450k) and the histone modifications H3K18ac and H3K9me3 (ChIP seq). Aza induced a general increase in gene expression with 924 significantly upregulated genes but this increase showed no correlation with changes in DNA methylation or H3K18ac, and only a weak association with changes in H3K9me3. Interestingly, we observed activation of transcripts containing 15 endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) confirming previous cell line studies. DNA methylation decreased moderately in 99% of all genes, with a median beta-value reduction of 0.018; the most pronounced effects seen in heterochromatin. Aza-induced hypomethylation correlated significantly with change in H3K9me3. The pattern of H3K18ac and H3K9me3 displayed large differences between patients and healthy controls without any consistent pattern induced by Aza. We conclude that the marked induction of gene expression only partly could be explained by epigenetic changes, and propose that activation of ERVs may contribute to the clinical effects of Aza in MDS.
  • Hallikainen, Anna (Helsingin yliopisto, 2018)
    Value research has previously focused on adults and young people, because either the children's value world is thought to be an unfinished process or the development of a suitable measurement has been too challenging. Research on children's values has, however, attracts an increasing amount of interest. Earlier studies have shown that the value structures and preferences of children and adults resemble each other without regard to culture. This research will help to create an initial review of the values and preferences of Finnish, more specifically, Espoo primary school children. The theoretical reference framework for the research is the theory of universal values by Shalom Schwartz (1992). The study was conducted with 228 Espoo primary school students. The material was collected from two test schools with Picture Based Values Survey for Children (PBVS-C) that was modified to the Finnish context. Data collected on four different test days were analyzed using the SPSS program. Value variables and their mutual structure were studied using Spearman's correlation and multidimensional scaling (MDS). The gender and age differences of the value preferences were analyzed with MANOVA. The values of the Espoo primary schools students are in sync with previous research results, both in terms of structures and preferences, with a few exceptions. In the future, it would be appropriate to examine the values with a more comprehensive sampling.
  • Koenecke, Christian; Goehring, Gudrun; de Wreede, Liesbeth C.; van Biezen, Anja; Scheid, Christof; Volin, Liisa; Maertens, Johan; Finke, Juergen; Schaap, Nicolaas; Robin, Marie; Passweg, Jakob; Cornelissen, Jan; Beelen, Dietrich; Heuser, Michael; de Witte, Theo; Kroeger, Nicolaus; MDS Subcomm Chronic Malignancies (2015)
    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the revised 5-group International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or secondary acute myeloid leukemia who were reported to the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation database. A total of 903 patients had sufficient cytogenetic information available at stem cell transplantation to be classified according to the 5-group classification. Poor and very poor risk according to this classification was an independent predictor of shorter relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 1.40 and 2.14), overall survival (hazard ratio 1.38 and 2.14), and significantly higher cumulative incidence of relapse (hazard ratio 1.64 and 2.76), compared to patients with very good, good or intermediate risk. When comparing the predictive performance of a series of Cox models both for relapse-free survival and for overall survival, a model with simplified 5-group cytogenetics (merging very good, good and intermediate cytogenetics) performed best. Furthermore, monosomal karyotype is an additional negative predictor for outcome within patients of the poor, but not the very poor risk group of the 5-group classification. The revised International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification allows patients with myelodysplastic syndromes to be separated into three groups with clearly different outcomes after stem cell transplantation. Poor and very poor risk cytogenetics were strong predictors of poor patient outcome. The new cytogenetic classification added value to prediction of patient outcome compared to prediction models using only traditional risk factors or the 3-group International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification.
  • Shimoni, Avichai; Labopin, Myriam; Savani, Bipin; Volin, Liisa; Ehninger, Gerhard; Kuball, Jurgen; Bunjes, Donald; Schaap, Nicolaas; Vigouroux, Stephane; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Veelken, Hendrik; Sierra, Jorge; Eder, Matthias; Niederwieser, Dietger; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2016)
    Background: Myeloablative (MAC) and reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) are established approaches for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most deaths after MAC occur within the first 2 years after SCT, while patients surviving leukemia-free for 2 years can expect a favorable long-term outcome. However, there is paucity of data on the long-term outcome (beyond 10 years) and the pattern of late events following RIC due to the relative recent introduction of this approach. Methods: We analyzed long-term outcomes in a cohort of 1423 AML patients, age >= 50 years, after SCT from HLA-matched siblings, during the years 1997-2005, median follow-up 8.3 years (0.1-17). Results: The 10-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) was 31 % (95CI, 27-35) and 32 % (28-35) after MAC and RIC, respectively (P = 0.57). The 10-year GVHD/relapse-free survival (GRFS), a surrogate for quality of life was 22 % (18-25) and 21 % (18-24), respectively (P = 0.79). The 10-year non-relapse mortality (NRM) was higher and relapse rate was lower after MAC, throughout the early and late post-transplant course. The 10-year LFS among 584 patients surviving leukemia-free 2 years after SCT was 71 % (65-76) and 73 % (67-78) after MAC and RIC, respectively (P = 0.76). Advanced leukemia at SCT was the major predictor of LFS subsequent to the 2-year landmark. Relapse was the major cause of late death after both regimens; however, NRM and in particular chronic graft-versus-host disease and second cancers were more common causes of late death after MAC. Conclusions: Long-term LFS and GRFS are similar after RIC and MAC. Most events after RIC or MAC occur within the first 2 years after SCT. Patients who are leukemia-free 2 years after SCT can expect similar good subsequent outcome after both approaches.
  • Scheid, C.; de Wreede, L.; van Biezen, A.; Koenecke, C.; Gohring, G.; Volin, L.; Maertens, J.; Finke, J.; Passweg, J.; Beelen, D.; Cornelissen, J. J.; Itälä-Remes, M.; Chevallier, P.; Russell, N.; Petersen, E.; Milpied, N.; Espiga, C. Richard; Peniket, A.; Sierra, J.; Mufti, G.; Crawley, C.; Veelken, J. H.; Ljungman, P.; Cahn, J. Y.; Alessandrino, E. P.; de Witte, T.; Robin, M.; Kroeger, N. (2017)
    The International Prognostic Scoring System has been revised (IPSS-R) to predict prognosis of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes at diagnosis. To validate the use of the IPSS-R assessed before transplant rather than at diagnosis we performed a retrospective analysis of the EBMT database. A total of 579 patients had sufficient information available to calculate IPSS-R at transplant. Median overall survival (OS) from transplant was significantly different according to IPSS-R: very low 23.6 months, low 55.0 months, intermediate 19.7 months, high 13.5 months, very high 7.8 months (P <0.001). In a multivariate Cox model the following parameters were significant risk factors for OS: IPSS-R, graft source, age and prior treatment. Median relapse free survival also showed significant differences according to IPSS-R: very low: 23.6 months, low: 24.8 months, intermediate 10.6 months, high 7.9 months, very high 5.5 months (P <0.001). Multivariate risk factors for relapse-free survival (RFS) were: IPSS-R, reduced intensity conditioning, graft source and prior treatment. A trend for an increased relapse incidence was noted for very high risk IPSS-R. We conclude that the IPSS-R at transplant is a useful prognostic score for predicting OS and RFS after transplantation, capturing both disease evolution and response to prior treatment before transplant.