Browsing by Subject "MEAT CONSUMPTION"

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  • Moller, Grith; Sluik, Diewertje; Ritz, Christian; Mikkilä, Vera; Raitakari, Olli T.; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Dragsted, Lars O.; Larsen, Thomas M.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Silvestre, Marta P.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Raben, Anne (2017)
    Higher-protein diets have been advocated for body-weight regulation for the past few decades. However, the potential health risks of these diets are still uncertain. We aimed to develop a protein score based on the quantity and source of protein, and to examine the association of the score with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns Study. Cross-sectional data from food-frequency questionnaires (n = 76,777 subjects) were used to develop a protein score consisting of two components: 1) percentage of energy from total protein, and 2) plant to animal protein ratio. An inverse association between protein score and HbA1c (slope -0.02 +/- 0.01 mmol/mol, p <0.001) was seen in Lifelines. We found a positive association between the protein score and eGFR in Lifelines (slope 0.17 +/- 0.02 mL/min/1.73 m(2), p <0.0001). Protein scoring might be a useful tool to assess both the effect of quantity and source of protein on health parameters. Further studies are needed to validate this newly developed protein score.
  • Omoruyi, Iyekhoetin Matthew; Ahamioje, Derek; Pohjanvirta, Raimo (2014)
  • Ward, Heather A.; Whitman, Julia; Muller, David C.; Johansson, Mattias; Jakszyn, Paula; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Palli, Domenico; Fanidi, Anouar; Vermeulen, Roel; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Dahm, Christina C.; Overvad, Kim; Severi, Gianluca; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Affret, Aurelie; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Berrino, Franco; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H.; Nost, Therese Haugdahl; Sandanger, Torkjel M.; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Agudo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Larranaga, Nerea; Maria Huerta, Jose; Ardanaz, Eva; Drake, Isabel; Brunnstrom, Hans; Johansson, Mikael; Grankvist, Kjell; Travis, Ruth C.; Freisling, Heinz; Stepien, Magdalena; Merritt, Melissa A.; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J. (2019)
    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that haem iron, which is found predominantly in red meat and increases endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, may be positively associated with lung cancer. The objective was to examine the relationship between haem iron intake and lung cancer risk using detailed smoking history data and serum cotinine to control for potential confounding. Methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 416,746 individuals from 10 countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident lung cancer (n = 3731) risk relative to haem iron, non-haem iron, and total dietary iron intake. A corresponding analysis was conducted among a nested subset of 800 lung cancer cases and 1489 matched controls for whom serum cotinine was available. Results Haem iron was associated with lung cancer risk, including after adjustment for details of smoking history (time since quitting, number of cigarettes per day): as a continuous variable (HR per 0.3 mg/1000 kcal 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.07), and in the highest versus lowest quintile (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.32; trend across quintiles: P = 0.035). In contrast, non-haem iron intake was related inversely with lung cancer risk; however, this association attenuated after adjustment for smoking history. Additional adjustment for serum cotinine did not considerably alter the associations detected in the nested case-control subset. Conclusions Greater haem iron intake may be modestly associated with lung cancer risk.