Browsing by Subject "MELANOMA"

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  • Havunen, Riikka; Santos, Joao M.; Sorsa, Suvi; Rantapero, Tommi; Lumen, Dave; Siurala, Mikko; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Tähtinen, Siri; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    Cancer treatment with local administration of armed oncolytic viruses could potentially induce systemic antitumor effects, or the abscopal effect, as they self-amplify in tumors, induce danger signaling, and promote tumor-associated antigen presentation. In this study, oncolytic adenovirus coding for human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 (also known as [a.k.a.] TILT-123) provoked antitumor efficacy in tumors that were injected with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 and those that were left non-injected in the same animal. Importantly, the virus was able to travel to distant tumors. To dissect the effects of oncolysis and cytokines, we studied replication-incompetent viruses in mice. Systemic antitumor effects were similar in both models, highlighting the importance of the arming device. The cytokines induced positive changes in immune cell infiltrates and induced the expression of several immune-reaction-related genes in tumors. In addition, Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 was able to increase homing of adoptively transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes into both injected and non-injected tumors, possibly mediated through chemokine expression. In summary, local treatment with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 resulted in systemic antitumor efficacy by inducing immune cell infiltration and trafficking into both treated and untreated tumors. Moreover, the oncolytic adenovirus platform had superior systemic effects over replication-deficient vector through spreading into distant tumors.
  • Neittaanmäki-Perttu, Noora; Gronroos, Mari; Jeskanen, Leila; Polonen, Ilkka; Ranki, Annamari; Saksela, Olli; Snellman, Erna (2015)
    Lentigo maligna (LM) is an in situ form of melanoma which can progress into invasive lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM). Variations in the pigmentation and thus visibility of the tumour make assessment of lesion borders challenging. We tested hyperspectral imaging system (HIS) in in vivo preoperative delineation of LM and LMM margins. We compared lesion margins delineated by HIS with those estimated clinically, and confirmed histologically. A total of 14 LMs and 5 LIVIMs in 19 patients were included. HIS analysis matched the histopathological analysis in 18/19 (94.7%) cases while in 1/19 (5.3%) cases HIS showed lesion extension not confirmed by histopathology (false positives). Compared to clinical examination, HIS defined lesion borders more accurately in 10/19 (52.6%) of cases (wider, n=7 or smaller, n=3) while in 8/19 (42.1%) cases lesion borders were the same as delineated clinically as confirmed histologically. Thus, HIS is useful for the detection of subclinical LM/LMM borders.
  • Iivanainen, Sanna; Ahvonen, Jarkko; Knuuttila, Aija; Tiainen, Satu; Koivunen, Jussi Pekka (2019)
    Background Anti-PD-(L)1 agents are standard of care treatments in various cancers but predictive factors for therapy selection are limited. We hypothesised that markers of systemic inflammation would predict adverse outcomes in multiple cancers treated with anti-PD-(L)1 agents. Material and methods Discovery cohort consisted of patients who were treated with anti-programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) agents for advanced melanoma (MEL), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or renal and bladder cancers (GU) at Oulu University Hospital and had pretreatment C reactive protein (CRP), or neutrophil/lymphocyte values available. As a validation cohort, we collected patients treated with anti-PD-1 agents from three other hospitals in Finland. Results In the discovery cohort (n=56, MEL n=23, GU n=17, NSCLC n=16), elevated CRP over the upper limit of normal (ULN) (>10mg/mL) indicated poor progression-free (PFS; p=0.005) and overall survival (OS; p=0.000004) in the whole population and in MEL subgroup. Elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (>2.65) also indicated inferior PFS (p=0.02) and OS (p=0.009). In the validation cohort (n=107,MEL n=44, NSCLC n=42, GU n=17, other n=4), CRP over ULN also was a strong indicator for poor PFS (p=0.0000008), and OS (p=0.000006) in the whole population, and in MEL and NSCLC also. Conclusions Systemic inflammation suggested by elevated CRP is a very strong indicator for adverse prognosis on patients treated with anti-PD-(L)1 agents and has a potential negative predictive value for treatment with anti-PD-(L)1 agents. Prospective trials should investigate whether patients with elevated CRP gain any significant benefit from anti-PD-1 therapy.
  • Julkunen, Heli; Cichonska, Anna; Gautam, Prson; Szedmak, Sandor; Douat, Jane; Pahikkala, Tapio; Aittokallio, Tero; Rousu, Juho (2020)
    We present comboFM, a machine learning framework for predicting the responses of drug combinations in pre-clinical studies, such as those based on cell lines or patient-derived cells. comboFM models the cell context-specific drug interactions through higher-order tensors, and efficiently learns latent factors of the tensor using powerful factorization machines. The approach enables comboFM to leverage information from previous experiments performed on similar drugs and cells when predicting responses of new combinations in so far untested cells; thereby, it achieves highly accurate predictions despite sparsely populated data tensors. We demonstrate high predictive performance of comboFM in various prediction scenarios using data from cancer cell line pharmacogenomic screens. Subsequent experimental validation of a set of previously untested drug combinations further supports the practical and robust applicability of comboFM. For instance, we confirm a novel synergy between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor crizotinib and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in lymphoma cells. Overall, our results demonstrate that comboFM provides an effective means for systematic pre-screening of drug combinations to support precision oncology applications. Combinatorial treatments have become a standard of care for various complex diseases including cancers. Here, the authors show that combinatorial responses of two anticancer drugs can be accurately predicted using factorization machines trained on large-scale pharmacogenomic data for guiding precision oncology studies.
  • Hemminki, Otto; Oksanen, Minna; Taipale, Kristian; Liikanen, Ilkka; Koski, Anniina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    The first US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)- and EMA-approved oncolytic virus has been available since 2015. However, there are no markers available that would predict benefit for the individual patient. During 2007-2012, we treated 290 patients with advanced chemotherapy-refractory cancers, using 10 different oncolytic adenoviruses. Treatments were given in a Finnish Medicines Agency (FIMEA)-regulated individualized patient treatment program (the Advanced Therapy Access Program [ATAP]), which required long-term follow-up of patients, which is presented here. Focusing on the longest surviving patients, some key clinical and biological features are presented as "oncograms." Some key attributes that could be captured in the oncogram are suggested to predict treatment response and survival after oncolytic adenovirus treatment. The oncogram includes immunological laboratory parameters assessed in peripheral blood (leukocytes, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, interleukin-8 [IL-81, HMGB1, antiviral neutralizing antibody status), features of the patient (gender, performance status), tumor features (histological tumor type, tumor load, region of metastases), and oncolytic virus-specific features (arming of the virus). The retrospective approach used here facilitates verification in a prospective controlled trial setting. To our knowledge, the oncogram is the first holistic attempt to identify the patients most likely to benefit from adenoviral oncolytic virotherapy.
  • Kuryk, Lukasz; Moller, Anne-Sophie W.; Vuolanto, Antti; Pesonen, Sari; Garofalo, Mariangela; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Jaderberg, Magnus (2019)
    Oncolytic adenoviruses can trigger lysis of tumor cells, induce an antitumor immune response, bypass classical chemotherapeutic resistance strategies of tumors, and provide opportunities for combination strategies. A major challenge is the development of scalable production methods for viral seed stocks and sufficient quantities of clinical grade viruses. Because of promising clinical signals in a compassionate use program (Advanced Therapy Access Program) which supported further development, we chose the oncolytic adenovirus ONCOS-401 as a testbed for a new approach to scale up. We found that the best viral production conditions in both T-175 flasks and HYPERFlasks included A549 cells grown to 220,000 cells/cm(2) (80% confluency), with ONCOS-401 infection at 30 multiplicity of infection (MOI), and an incubation period of 66 h. The Lysis A harvesting method with benzonase provided the highest viral yield from both T-175 and HYPERFlasks (10,887 +/- 100 and 14,559 +/- 802 infectious viral particles/cell, respectively). T-175 flasks and HYPERFlasks produced up to 2.1 x 10(9) +/- 0.2 and 1.75 x 10(9) +/- 0.08 infectious particles of ONCOS-401 per cm(2) of surface area, respectively. Our findings suggest a suitable stepwise process that can be applied to optimizing the initial production of other oncolytic viruses.
  • Rantala, Elina S.; Hernberg, Micaela; Kivelä, Tero T. (2019)
  • Santos, Joao; Heiniö, Camilla; Quixabeira, Dafne; Zafar, Sadia; Clubb, James; Pakola, Santeri; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Havunen, Riikka; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2021)
    Immunotherapy with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or oncolytic adenoviruses, have shown promising results in cancer treatment, when used as separate therapies. When used in combination, the antitumor effect is synergistically potentiated due oncolytic adenovirus infection and its immune stimulating effects on T cells. Indeed, studies in hamsters have shown a 100% complete response rate when animals were treated with oncolytic adenovirus coding for TNFa and IL-2 (Ad5/3-E2F-D24-hTNFa-IRES-hIL2; TILT-123) and TIL therapy. In humans, one caveat with oncolytic virus therapy is that intratumoral injection has been traditionally preferred over systemic administration, for achieving sufficient virus concentrations in tumors, especially when neutralizing antibodies emerge. We have previously shown that 5/3 chimeric oncolytic adenovirus can bind to human lymphocytes for avoidance of neutralization. In this study, we hypothesized that incubation of oncolytic adenovirus (TILT-123) with TILs prior to systemic injection would allow delivery of virus to tumors. This approach would deliver both components in one self-amplifying product. TILs would help deliver TILT-123, whose replication will recruit more TILs and increase their cytotoxicity. In vitro, TILT-123 was seen binding efficiently to lymphocytes, supporting the idea of dual administration. We show in vivo in different models that virus could be delivered to tumors with TILs as carriers.
  • Cervera-Carrascon, V.; Siurala, M.; Santos, J. M.; Havunen, R.; Tähtinen, S.; Karell, P.; Sorsa, S.; Kanerva, A.; Hemminki, A. (2018)
    Releasing the patient's immune system against their own malignancy by the use of checkpoint inhibitors is delivering promising results. However, only a subset of patients currently benefit from them. One major limitation of these therapies relates to the inability of T cells to detect or penetrate into the tumor resulting in unresponsiveness to checkpoint inhibition. Virotherapy is an attractive tool for enabling checkpoint inhibitors as viruses are naturally recognized by innate defense elements which draws the attention of the immune system. Besides their intrinsic immune stimulating properties, the adenoviruses used here are armed to express tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). These cytokines result in immunological danger signaling and multiple appealing T-cell effects, including trafficking, activation and propagation. When these viruses were injected into B16.OVA melanoma tumors in animals concomitantly receiving programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1) blocking antibodies both tumor growth control (p <0.0001) and overall survival (p <0.01) were improved. In this set-up, the addition of adoptive cell therapy with OT-I lymphocytes did not increase efficacy further. When virus injections were initiated before antibody treatment in a prime-boost approach, 100% of tumors regressed completely and all mice survived. Viral expression of IL2 and TNFa altered the cytokine balance in the tumor microenvironment towards Th1 and increased the intratumoral proportion of CD8+ and conventional CD4+ T cells. These preclinical studies provide the rationale and schedule for a clinical trial where oncolytic adenovirus coding for TNFa and IL-2 (TILT-123) is used in melanoma patients receiving an anti-PD-1 antibody.