Browsing by Subject "MEN2B"

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  • Kopra, Jaakko; Villarta-Aguilera, Marian; Savolainen, Mari; Weingerl, Samo; Myohänen, Timo T.; Rannanpää, Saara; Salvatore, Michael E.; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Piepponen, T. Petteri (2018)
    Addictive drugs enhance dopamine release in the striatum, which can lead to compulsive drug-seeking after repeated exposure. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is an important regulator of midbrain dopamine neurons, and may play a mechanistic role in addiction-related behaviors. To elucidate the components of GDNF-signaling that contribute to addiction-related behaviors of place preference and its extinction, we utilized two genetically modified GDNF mouse models in an amphetamine induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm and evaluated how the behavioral findings correlate with dopamine signaling in the dorsal and ventral striatum. We utilized two knock-in mouse strains to delineate contributions of GDNF and Ret signaling using MEN2B mice (constitutively active GDNF receptor Ret), and GDNF hypermorphic mice (enhanced endogenous GDNF expression). The duration of amphetamine-induced CPP was greatly enhanced in MEN2B mice, but not in the GDNF hypermorphic mice. The enhanced duration of CPP was correlated with increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine content in the ventral striatum. Together, our results suggest that downstream components of GDNF signaling, in this case Ret, may mediate persistent drug-seeking behavior through increased TH expression and dopamine levels in the mesolimbic dopamine neurons. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Montonen, Heidi (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    Literature review: The plasma membrane DA transporter (DAT) belongs to the family of Na+/ClÙÄÉ≠ dependent neurotransmitter transporters. DAT is the primary mechanism for clearance of dopamine from the extracellular space and transporting it back to the presynaptic nerve terminals. There's a great interest in the DAT and its regulation as its substrate, dopamine, mediates a wide array of physiological functions e.g. locomotor activity, cognition and the control of motivated behaviors. With selective transport DAT limits the intensity and the duration of dopaminergic signal. Its function is regulated by several kinases, phosphatase and protein-protein interactions. The altered expression of DAT may be related to several neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease, addiction and ADHD. To study DAT's function, several genetically modified mouse lines including DAT knockout mice, DAT knockdown mice and DAT knock in mice with elevated DAT levels have been generated. Experimental part: Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) plays important role in the survival and function of dopaminergic neurons, learning, memory and synaptic plasticity. More recently, several studies have shown that GDNF can also negatively regulate the actions of abused drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate GDNF's role and mechanism of action in plasticity and function of the dopaminergic neurons projecting to striatum. For that purpose, we used in vivo microdialysis in freely moving mice. We chose two different mouse lines: MEN2B mice with constitutive active Ret-signaling and elevated striatal dopamine concentrations, and GDND-cKO mice that lack GDND in the central nervous system. Microdialysis guide cannula was implanted in the dorsal striatum in the stereotaxic surgery and the mice were allowed to recover for 5-7 days. The concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites DOPAC and HVA and also 5-HIAA were determined from the samples by highperformance liquid chromatography. Microdialysis was performed twice for every mouse on days 1 and 4. Between microdialysis days, the mice were given amphetamine 1 mg/kg i.p. on days 2 and 3. In the microdialysis experiment, the mice received amphetamine stimulation (100 µM/60 min) via microdialysis probe. The placements of microdialysis probes were verified from fixed brain sections after the experiments. Amphetamine increased the dopamine output in both mouse lines, but there were no statistically significant differences in striatal dopamine concentrations between genotypes neither after acute nor chronic administration. However, there was a difference between the dopamine outputs in days 1 and 4 in both MEN2B and GDNF-cKO mice: The striatal dopamine concentrations were significantly lower on the second microdialysis day. This may be a sing from tolerance to the drug. However, without more research, it is not possible, by this experiment, to draw direct conclusions of GDNF's role in addiction and in plasticity in striatum. It is possible that the differences between genotypes are too small to be seen with microdialysis. Development of compensatory mechanisms in mice cannot be ruled out either. Effects may also vary between different brain areas.