Browsing by Subject "MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION"

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  • Rosenstrom, Tom; Fawcett, Tim W.; Higginson, Andrew D.; Metsa-Simola, Niina; Hagen, Edward H.; Houston, Alasdair I.; Martikainen, Pekka (2017)
    Divorce is associated with an increased probability of a depressive episode, but the causation of events remains unclear. Adaptive models of depression propose that depression is a social strategy in part, whereas non-adaptive models tend to propose a diathesis-stress mechanism. We compare an adaptive evolutionary model of depression to three alternative non-adaptive models with respect to their ability to explain the temporal pattern of depression around the time of divorce. Register-based data (304,112 individuals drawn from a random sample of 11% of Finnish people) on antidepressant purchases is used as a proxy for depression. This proxy affords an unprecedented temporal resolution (a 3-monthly prevalence estimates over 10 years) without any bias from non-compliance, and it can be linked with underlying episodes via a statistical model. The evolutionary-adaptation model (all time periods with risk of divorce are depressogenic) was the best quantitative description of the data. The non-adaptive stress-relief model (period before divorce is depressogenic and period afterwards is not) provided the second best quantitative description of the data. The peak-stress model (periods before and after divorce can be depressogenic) fit the data less well, and the stress-induction model (period following divorce is depressogenic and the preceding period is not) did not fit the data at all. The evolutionary model was the most detailed mechanistic description of the divorce-depression link among the models, and the best fit in terms of predicted curvature; thus, it offers most rigorous hypotheses for further study. The stress-relief model also fit very well and was the best model in a sensitivity analysis, encouraging development of more mechanistic models for that hypothesis.
  • Neuman, Manuela G.; French, Samuel W.; Zakhari, Samir; Malnick, Stephen; Seitz, Helmut K.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Salaspuro, Mikko; Voinea-Griffin, Andreea; Barasch, Andrei; Kirpich, Irina A.; Thomes, Paul G.; Schrum, Laura W.; Donohue, Terrence M.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Cruz, Marcus; Opris, Mihai (2017)
    This paper is based upon the "8th Charles Lieber's Satellite Symposium" organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism Annual Meeting, on June 25, 2016 at New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. The integrative symposium investigated different aspects of alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) as well as non alcohol -induced liver disease (NAFLD) and possible repair. We revealed the basic aspects of alcohol metabolism that may be responsible for the development of liver disease as well as the factors that determine the amount, frequency and which type of alcohol misuse leads to liver and gastrointestinal diseases. We aimed to (1) describe the immuno-pathology of ALD, (2) examine the role of genetics in the development of alcoholic hepatitis (ASH) and NAFLD, (3) propose diagnostic markers of ASH and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), (4) examine age and ethnic differences as well as analyze the validity of some models, (5) develop common research tools and biomarkers to study alcohol-induced effects, 6) examine the role of alcohol in oral health and colon and gastrointestinal cancer and (7) focus on factors that aggravate the severity of organ-damage. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterizes ALD and NAFLD. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD with simple fatty infiltrations and chronic alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular.and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Other risk factors such as its co-morbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human deficiency virus were discussed. Dysregulation of metabolism, as a result of ethanol exposure, in the intestine leads to colon carcinogenesis. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota have been suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of the metabolic syndrome in the aging population, have been presented. The symposium addressed mechanisms and biomarkers of alcohol induced damage to different organs, as well as the role of the microbiome in this dialog. The microbiota regulates and acts as a key element in harmonizing immune responses at intestinal mucosal surfaces. It is known that microbiota is an inducer of proinflammatory T helper 17 cells and regulatory T cells in the intestine. The signals at the sites of inflammation mediate recruitment and differentiation in order to remove inflammatory inducers and promote tissue homeostasis restoration. The change in the intestinal microbiota also influences the change in obesity and regresses the liver steatosis. Evidence on the positive role of moderate alcohol consumption on heart and metabolic diseases as well on reducing steatosis have been looked up. Moreover nutrition as a therapeutic intervention in alcoholic liver disease has been discussed. In addition to the original data, we searched the literature (2008-2016) for the latest publication on the described subjects. In order to obtain the updated data we used the usual engines (Pub Med and Google Scholar). The intention of the eighth symposia was to advance the international profile of the biological research on alcoholism. We also wish to further our mission of leading the forum to progress the science and practice of translational research in alcoholism. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Korhonen, Päivi E.; Mikkola, Tuija; Kautiainen, Hannu; Eriksson, Johan G. (2021)
    High body mass index (BMI) is known to be associated with elevated blood pressure (BP). The present study aims to determine the relative importance of the two components of BMI, fat mass and lean body mass index, on BP levels. We assessed body composition with bioimpedance and performed 24 hour ambulatory BP measurements in 534 individuals (mean age 61 +/- 3 years) who had no cardiovascular medication. Fat mass index and lean mass index were calculated analogously to BMI as fat mass or lean body mass (kg) divided by the square of height (m2). Both fat mass index and lean mass index showed a positive, small to moderate relationship with all 24 hour BP components independently of age, sex, smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. There were no interaction effects between fat mass index and lean mass index on the mean BP levels. Adult lean body mass is a significant determinant of BP levels with an equal, albeit small to moderate magnitude as fat mass. Relatively high amount of muscle mass may not be beneficial to cardiovascular health.
  • Vogt, Susanne; Wahl, Simone; Kettunen, Johannes; Breitner, Susanne; Kastenmueller, Gabi; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Waldenberger, Melanie; Kratzsch, Juergen; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Peters, Annette; Grallert, Harald; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Thorand, Barbara (2016)
    Background: Numerous observational studies have observed associations between vitamin D deficiency and cardiometabolic diseases, but these findings might be confounded by obesity. A characterization of the metabolic profile associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels, in general and stratified by abdominal obesity, may help to untangle the relationship between vitamin D, obesity and cardiometabolic health. Methods: Serum metabolomics measurements were obtained from a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)- and a mass spectrometry (MS)-based platform. The discovery was conducted in 1726 participants of the population-based KORA-F4 study, in which the associations of the concentrations of 415 metabolites with 25(OH)D levels were assessed in linear models. The results were replicated in 6759 participants (NMR) and 609 (MS) participants, respectively, of the population-based FINRISK 1997 study. Results: Mean [standard deviation (SD)] 25(OH)D levels were 15.2 (7.5) ng/ml in KORA F4 and 13.8 (5.9) ng/ml in FINRISK 1997; 37 metabolites were associated with 25(OH) D in KORA F4 at P <0.05/415. Of these, 30 associations were replicated in FINRISK 1997 at P <0.05/37. Among these were constituents of (very) large very-low-density lipoprotein and small low-density lipoprotein subclasses and related measures like serum triglycerides as well as fatty acids and measures reflecting the degree of fatty acid saturation. The observed associations were independent of waist circumference and generally similar in abdominally obese and non-obese participants. Conclusions: Independently of abdominal obesity, higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with a metabolite profile characterized by lower concentrations of atherogenic lipids and a higher degree of fatty acid polyunsaturation. These results indicate that the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and cardiometabolic diseases is unlikely to merely reflect obesity-related pathomechanisms.
  • Felix, Janine F.; Joubert, Bonnie R.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Sharp, Gemma C.; Almqvist, Catarina; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Arshad, Hasan; Baiz, Nour; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Bakulski, Kelly M.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Bouchard, Luigi; Breton, Carrie V.; Brunekreef, Bert; Brunst, Kelly J.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Bustamante, Mariona; Chatzi, Leda; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng; Corpeleijn, Eva; Czamara, Darina; Dabelea, Dana; Smith, George Davey; De Boever, Patrick; Duijts, Liesbeth; Dwyer, Terence; Eng, Celeste; Eskenazi, Brenda; Everson, Todd M.; Falahi, Fahimeh; Fallin, M. Daniele; Farchi, Sara; Fernandez, Mariana F.; Gao, Lu; Gaunt, Tom R.; Ghantous, Akram; Gillman, Matthew W.; Gonseth, Semira; Grote, Veit; Gruzieva, Olena; Haberg, Siri E.; Herceg, Zdenko; Hivert, Marie-France; Holland, Nina; Holloway, John W.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Hu, Donglei; Huang, Rae-Chi; Huen, Karen; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jima, Dereje D.; Just, Allan C.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Karlsson, Robert; Karmaus, Wilfried; Kechris, Katerina J.; Kere, Juha; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koletzko, Berthold; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Kupers, Leanne K.; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Lahti, Jari; Lambrechts, Nathalie; Langie, Sabine A. S.; Lie, Rolv T.; Liu, Andrew H.; Magnus, Maria C.; Magnus, Per; Maguire, Rachel L.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McArdle, Wendy; Melen, Erik; Melton, Phillip; Murphy, Susan K.; Nawrot, Tim S.; Nistico, Lorenza; Nohr, Ellen A.; Nordlund, Bjorn; Nystad, Wenche; Oh, Sam S.; Oken, Emily; Page, Christian M.; Perron, Patrice; Pershagen, Goran; Pizzi, Costanza; Plusquin, Michelle; Räikkönen, Katri; Reese, Sarah E.; Reischl, Eva; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Ring, Susan; Roy, Ritu P.; Rzehak, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Schwartz, David A.; Sebert, Sylvain; Snieder, Harold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Starling, Anne P.; Sunyer, Jordi; ATaylor, Jack; Tiemeier, Henning; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; Vafeiadi, Marina; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H.; Vonk, Judith M.; Vriens, Annette; Vrijheid, Martine; Wang, Pei; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Xu, Zongli; Yang, Ivana V.; Yousefi, Paul; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Weiming; Zhao, Shanshan; Agha, Golareh; Relton, Caroline L.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; London, Stephanie J. (2018)
  • Surendran, Praveen; Feofanova, Elena; Lahrouchi, Najim; Ntalla, Ioanna; Karthikeyan, Savita; Cook, James; Chen, Lingyan; Mifsud, Borbala; Yao, Chen; Kraja, Aldi T.; Cartwright, James H.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Giri, Ayush; Tragante, Vinicius; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Liu, Dajiang J.; Prins, Bram P.; Stewart, Isobel D.; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Eales, James M.; Akbarov, Artur; Auer, Paul L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bis, Joshua C.; Braithwaite, Vickie S.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Daw, E. Warwick; Warren, Helen R.; Drenos, Fotios; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Faul, Jessica D.; Fauman, Eric B.; Fava, Cristiano; Ferreira, Teresa; Foley, Christopher N.; Franceschini, Nora; Gao, He; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Giulianini, Franco; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guo, Xiuqing; Harris, Sarah E.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Helgadottir, Anna; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kontto, Jukka; Larson, Martin G.; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lindström, Jaana; Lotta, Luca A.; Lu, Yingchang; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Malerba, Giovanni; Masca, Nicholas G. D.; Mei, Hao; Menni, Cristina; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Mosen-Ansorena, David; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Pare, Guillaume; Paul, Dirk S.; Perola, Markus; Poveda, Alaitz; Rauramaa, Rainer; Richard, Melissa; Richardson, Tom G.; Sepulveda, Nuno; Sim, Xueling; Smith, Albert; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staley, James R.; Stanakova, Alena; Sulem, Patrick; Theriault, Sebastien; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Trompet, Stella; Varga, Tibor V.; Edwards, Digna R. Velez; Veronesi, Giovanni; Weiss, Stefan; Willems, Sara M.; Yao, Jie; Young, Robin; Yu, Bing; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing-Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Evangelou, Evangelos; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Asllanaj, Eralda; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Braund, Peter S.; Burgess, Stephen; Cho, Kelly; Christensen, Cramer; Connell, John; de Mutsert, Renee; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dorr, Marcus; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Gaziano, J. Michael; Grarup, Niels; Grove, Megan L.; Hallmans, Goran; Hansen, Torben; Have, Christian T.; Heiss, Gerardo; Jorgensen, Marit E.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kajantie, Eero; Kamat, Mihir; Karajamaki, AnneMari; Karpe, Fredrik; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lannfelt, Lars; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Linneberg, Allan; Martin, Lisa W.; Moitry, Marie; Nadkarni, Girish; Neville, Matt J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, James; Poulter, Neil; Rasheed, Asif; Rasmussen, Katrine L.; Rayner, N. William; Magi, Reedik; Renstrom, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rossouw, Jacques; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Sever, Peter S.; Sigurdsson, Emil L.; Skaaby, Tea; Sun, Yan; Sundstrom, Johan; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Esko, Tonu; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Tsao, Philip S.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Turner, Stephen T.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Willer, Cristen J.; Wilson, Peter W. F.; Witte, Daniel R.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhang, He; Aliya, Naheed; Almgren, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Barnes, Michael R.; Blakemore, Alexandra; Boehnke, Michael; Bots, Michiel L.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Buring, Julie E.; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Conen, David; Correa, Adolfo; Smith, George Davey; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrieres, Jean; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Franks, Paul W.; Franks, Stephen; Frossard, Philippe; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gaunt, Tom R.; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Hennig, Branwen J.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Ingelsson, Erik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kee, Frank; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Laakso, Markku; McCarthy, Mark; Melander, Olle; Mohlke, Karen L.; Murray, Alison D.; Nordestgaard, Borge Gronne; Orho-Melander, Marju; Packard, Chris J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David J.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Province, Michael A.; Relton, Caroline L.; Rice, Kenneth; Ridker, Paul M.; Rolandsson, Olov; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rotter, Jerome; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sattar, Naveed; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Smith, Blair H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Starr, John M.; Sebert, Sylvain; Taylor, Kent D.; Lakka, Timo A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Meer, Peter; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Verweij, Niek; Virtamo, Jarmo; Volker, Uwe; Weir, David R.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Charchar, Fadi J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Butterworth, Adam S.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Danesh, John; Edwards, Todd L.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Adriana M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Liu, Chunyu; Manning, Alisa K.; Morris, Andrew P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Saleheen, Danish; Stefansson, Kari; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chasman, Daniel; Levy, Daniel; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.; Howson, Joanna M. M. (2020)
    Genetic studies of blood pressure (BP) to date have mainly analyzed common variants (minor allele frequency > 0.05). In a meta-analysis of up to similar to 1.3 million participants, we discovered 106 new BP-associated genomic regions and 87 rare (minor allele frequency
  • Wesolowska, Karolina; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Jokela, Markus; Pulkki-Raback, Laura; Pitkänen, Niina; Lipsanen, Jari; Tukiainen, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Juonala, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa (2017)
    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been associated with depressive symptoms, but the causal direction of this association and the underlying mechanisms, such as increased glucose levels, remain unclear. We used instrumental-variable regression with a genetic instrument (Mendelian randomization) to examine a causal role of increased glucose concentrations in the development of depressive symptoms. Data were from the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (n = 1217). Depressive symptoms were assessed in 2012 using a modified Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-I). Fasting glucose was measured concurrently with depressive symptoms. A genetic risk score for fasting glucose (with 35 single nucleotide polymorphisms) was used as an instrumental variable for glucose. Glucose was not associated with depressive symptoms in the standard linear regression (B = -0.04, 95% CI [-0.12, 0.04], p = .34), but the instrumental-variable regression showed an inverse association between glucose and depressive symptoms (B = -0.43, 95% CI [-0.79, -0.07], p = .020). The difference between the estimates of standard linear regression and instrumental-variable regression was significant (p = .026) Our results suggest that the association between T2D and depressive symptoms is unlikely to be caused by increased glucose concentrations. It seems possible that T2D might be linked to depressive symptoms due to low glucose levels.
  • Li, Chen; Stoma, Svetlana; Lotta, Luca A.; Warner, Sophie; Albrecht, Eva; Allione, Alessandra; Arp, Pascal P.; Broer, Linda; Buxton, Jessica L.; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Deelen, Joris; Fedko, Iryna O.; Gordon, Scott D.; Jiang, Tao; Karlsson, Robert; Kerrison, Nicola; Loe, Taylor K.; Mangino, Massimo; Milaneschi, Yuri; Miraglio, Benjamin; Pervjakova, Natalia; Russo, Alessia; Surakka, Ida; van der Spek, Ashley; Verhoeven, Josine E.; Amin, Najaf; Beekman, Marian; Blakemore, Alexandra I.; Canzian, Federico; Hamby, Stephen E.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jones, Peter D.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Mägi, Reedik; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Perola, Markus; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sillanpää, Elina; Suchiman, H. Eka; van Heemst, Diana; Willemsen, Gonneke; Agudo, Antonio; Boeing, Heiner; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Fagherazzi, Guy; Ferrari, Pietro; Franks, Paul; Gieger, Christian; Eriksson, Johan Gunnar; Gunter, Marc; Hägg, Sara; Hovatta, Iiris; Imaz, Liher; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy; Krogh, Vittorio; Martin, Nicholas G.; Melander, Olle; Metspalu, Andres; Moreno, Concha; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Nilsson, Peter; Ong, Ken K.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Penninx, Brenda W.J. H.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Scott, Robert A.; Severi, Gianluca; Slagboom, P. Eline; Spector, Tim D.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini; Matullo, Giuseppe; Butterworth, Adam S.; Danesh, John; Samani, Nilesh J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Langenberg, Claudia; Codd, Veryan (2020)
    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is a heritable biomarker of genomic aging. In this study, we perform a genome-wide meta-analysis of LTL by pooling densely genotyped and imputed association results across large-scale European-descent studies including up to 78,592 individuals. We identify 49 genomic regions at a false dicovery rate (FDR) <0.05 threshold and prioritize genes at 31, with five highlighting nucleotide metabolism as an important regulator of LTL. We report six genome-wide significant loci in or near SENP7, MOB1B, CARMIL1, PRRC2A, TERF2, and RFWD3, and our results support recently identified PARP1, POT1, ATM, and MPHOSPH6 loci. Phenome-wide analyses in >350,000 UK Biobank participants suggest that genetically shorter telomere length increases the risk of hypothyroidism and decreases the risk of thyroid cancer, lymphoma, and a range of proliferative conditions. Our results replicate previously reported associations with increased risk of coronary artery disease and lower risk for multiple cancer types. Our findings substantially expand current knowledge on genes that regulate LTL and their impact on human health and disease.
  • Genetics DNA Methylation Consort; NHLBI Trans-Omics Precision Med; McCartney, Daniel L.; Min, Josine L.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Palviainen, Teemu; Ollikainen, Miina; Kaprio, Jaakko (2021)
    Background Biological aging estimators derived from DNA methylation data are heritable and correlate with morbidity and mortality. Consequently, identification of genetic and environmental contributors to the variation in these measures in populations has become a major goal in the field. Results Leveraging DNA methylation and SNP data from more than 40,000 individuals, we identify 137 genome-wide significant loci, of which 113 are novel, from genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses of four epigenetic clocks and epigenetic surrogate markers for granulocyte proportions and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels, respectively. We find evidence for shared genetic loci associated with the Horvath clock and expression of transcripts encoding genes linked to lipid metabolism and immune function. Notably, these loci are independent of those reported to regulate DNA methylation levels at constituent clock CpGs. A polygenic score for GrimAge acceleration showed strong associations with adiposity-related traits, educational attainment, parental longevity, and C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion This study illuminates the genetic architecture underlying epigenetic aging and its shared genetic contributions with lifestyle factors and longevity.
  • 23andMe Res Team; Subst Use Disorders Working Grp Ps; Int Cannabis Consortium (2018)
    Cannabis use is a heritable trait that has been associated with adverse mental health outcomes. In the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) for lifetime cannabis use to date (N = 184,765), we identified eight genome-wide significant independent single nucleotide polymorphisms in six regions. All measured genetic variants combined explained 11% of the variance. Gene-based tests revealed 35 significant genes in 16 regions, and S-PrediXcan analyses showed that 21 genes had different expression levels for cannabis users versus nonusers. The strongest finding across the different analyses was CADM2, which has been associated with substance use and risk-taking. Significant genetic correlations were found with 14 of 25 tested sub-stance use and mental health-related traits, including smoking, alcohol use, schizophrenia and risk-taking. Mendelian randomization analysis showed evidence for a causal positive influence of schizophrenia risk on cannabis use. Overall, our study provides new insights into the etiology of cannabis use and its relation with mental health.
  • CREAM Consortium; Tedja, Milly S.; Haarman, Annechien E. G.; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wedenoja, Juho (2019)
    The knowledge on the genetic background of refractive error and myopia has expanded dramatically in the past few years. This white paper aims to provide a concise summary of current genetic findings and defines the direction where development is needed. We performed an extensive literature search and conducted informal discussions with key stakeholders. Specific topics reviewed included common refractive error, any and high myopia, and myopia related to syndromes. To date, almost 200 genetic loci have been identified for refractive error and myopia, and risk variants mostly carry low risk but are highly prevalent in the general population. Several genes for secondary syndromic myopia overlap with those for common myopia. Polygenic risk scores show overrepresentation of high myopia in the higher deciles of risk. Annotated genes have a wide variety of functions, and all retinal layers appear to be sites of expression. The current genetic findings offer a world of new molecules involved in myopiagenesis. As the missing heritability is still large, further genetic advances are needed. This Committee recommends expanding large-scale, in-depth genetic studies using complementary big data analytics, consideration of gene-environment effects by thorough measurement of environmental exposures, and focus on subgroups with extreme phenotypes and high familial occurrence. Functional characterization of associated variants is simultaneously needed to bridge the knowledge gap between sequence variance and consequence for eye growth.
  • Taylor, D. Leland; Jackson, Anne U.; Narisu, Narisu; Hemani, Gibran; Erdos, Michael R.; Chines, Peter S.; Swift, Amy; Idol, Jackie; Didion, John P.; Welch, Ryan P.; Kinnunen, Leena; Saramies, Jouko; Lakka, Timo A.; Laakso, Markku; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Smith, George Davey; Boehnke, Michael; Scott, Laura J.; Birney, Ewan; Collins, Francis S. (2019)
    We integrate comeasured gene expression and DNA methylation (DNAme) in 265 human skeletal muscle biopsies from the FUSION study with >7 million genetic variants and eight physiological traits: height, waist, weight, waist-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting serum insulin, fasting plasma glucose, and type 2 diabetes. We find hundreds of genes and DNAme sites associated with fasting insulin, waist, and body mass index, as well as thousands of DNAme sites associated with gene expression (eQTM). We find that controlling for heterogeneity in tissue/muscle fiber type reduces the number of physiological trait associations, and that long-range eQTMs (>1 Mb) are reduced when controlling for tissue/muscle fiber type or latent factors. We map genetic regulators (quantitative trait loci; QTLs) of expression (eQTLs) and DNAme (mQTLs). Using Mendelian randomization (MR) and mediation techniques, we leverage these genetic maps to predict 213 causal relationships between expression and DNAme, approximately two-thirds of which predict methylation to causally influence expression. We use MR to integrate FUSION mQTLs, FUSION eQTLs, and GTEx eQTLs for 48 tissues with genetic associations for 534 diseases and quantitative traits. We identify hundreds of genes and thousands of DNAme sites that may drive the reported disease/quantitative trait genetic associations. We identify 300 gene expression MR associations that are present in both FUSION and GTEx skeletal muscle and that show stronger evidence of MR association in skeletal muscle than other tissues, which may partially reflect differences in power across tissues. As one example, we find that increased RXRA muscle expression may decrease lean tissue mass.
  • Beynon, Rhona A.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Santos Ferreira, Diana L.; Ness, Andrew R.; May, Margaret; Davey Smith, George; Vincent, Emma E.; Adams, Charleen; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Würtz, Peter; Soidinsalo, Sebastian; Metcalfe, Christopher; Donovan, Jenny L.; Lane, Athene J.; Martin, Richard M. (2019)
    Lycopene and green tea consumption have been observationally associated with reduced prostate cancer risk, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of factorial randomisation to a 6-month lycopene and green tea dietary advice or supplementation intervention on 159 serum metabolite measures in 128 men with raised PSA levels (but prostate cancer-free), analysed by intention-to-treat. The causal effects of metabolites modified by the intervention on prostate cancer risk were then assessed by Mendelian randomisation, using summary statistics from 44,825 prostate cancer cases and 27,904 controls. The systemic effects of lycopene and green tea supplementation on serum metabolic profile were comparable to the effects of the respective dietary advice interventions (R-2 = 0.65 and 0.76 for lycopene and green tea respectively). Metabolites which were altered in response to lycopene supplementation were acetate [beta (standard deviation difference vs. placebo): 0.69; 95% CI = 0.24, 1.15; p = 0.003], valine (beta: -0.62; -1.03, -0.02; p = 0.004), pyruvate (beta: -0.56; -0.95, -0.16; p = 0.006) and docosahexaenoic acid (beta: -0.50; -085, -0.14; p = 0.006). Valine and diacylglycerol were lower in the lycopene dietary advice group (beta: -0.65; -1.04, -0.26; p = 0.001 and beta: -0.59; -1.01, -0.18; p = 0.006). A genetically instrumented SD increase in pyruvate increased the odds of prostate cancer by 1.29 (1.03, 1.62; p = 0.027). An intervention to increase lycopene intake altered the serum metabolome of men at risk of prostate cancer. Lycopene lowered levels of pyruvate, which our Mendelian randomisation analysis suggests may be causally related to reduced prostate cancer risk.
  • Ference, Brian A.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Graham, Ian; Ray, Kausik K.; Packard, Chris J.; Bruckert, Eric; Hegele, Robert A.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Raal, Frederick J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Watts, Gerald F.; Boren, Jan; Fazio, Sergio; Horton, Jay D.; Masana, Luis; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; van de Sluis, Bart; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tokgözoglu, Lale; Landmesser, Ulf; Laufs, Ulrich; Wiklund, Olov; Stock, Jane K.; Chapman, M. John; Catapano, Alberico L. (2017)
    Aims To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence from genetic studies, prospective epidemiologic cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies, and randomized trials of LDL-lowering therapies. In clinical studies, plasma LDL burden is usually estimated by determination of plasma LDL cholesterol level (LDL-C). Rare genetic mutations that cause reduced LDL receptor function lead to markedly higher LDL-C and a dose-dependent increase in the risk of ASCVD, whereas rare variants leading to lower LDL-C are associated with a correspondingly lower risk of ASCVD. Separate meta-analyses of over 200 prospective cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies, and randomized trials including more than 2 million participants with over 20 million person-years of follow-up and over 150 000 cardiovascular events demonstrate a remarkably consistent dose-dependent log-linear association between the absolute magnitude of exposure of the vasculature to LDL-C and the risk of ASCVD; and this effect appears to increase with increasing duration of exposure to LDL-C. Both the naturally randomized genetic studies and the randomized intervention trials consistently demonstrate that any mechanism of lowering plasma LDL particle concentration should reduce the risk of ASCVD events proportional to the absolute reduction in LDL-C and the cumulative duration of exposure to lower LDL-C, provided that the achieved reduction in LDL-C is concordant with the reduction in LDL particle number and that there are no competing deleterious off-target effects. Conclusion Consistent evidence from numerous and multiple different types of clinical and genetic studies unequivocally establishes that LDL causes ASCVD.
  • Cazaly, Emma; Saad, Joseph; Wang, Wenyu; Heckman, Caroline; Ollikainen, Miina; Tang, Jing (2019)
    Epigenetic research involves examining the mitotically heritable processes that regulate gene expression, independent of changes in the DNA sequence. Recent technical advances such as whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and affordable epigenomic array-based technologies, allow researchers to measure epigenetic profiles of large cohorts at a genome-wide level, generating comprehensive high-dimensional datasets that may contain important information for disease development and treatment opportunities. The epigenomic profile for a certain disease is often a result of the complex interplay between multiple genetic and environmental factors, which poses an enormous challenge to visualize and interpret these data. Furthermore, due to the dynamic nature of the epigenome, it is critical to determine causal relationships from the many correlated associations. In this review we provide an overview of recent data analysis approaches to integrate various omics layers to understand epigenetic mechanisms of complex diseases, such as obesity and cancer. We discuss the following topics: (i) advantages and limitations of major epigenetic profiling techniques, (ii) resources for standardization, annotation and harmonization of epigenetic data, and (iii) statistical methods and machine learning methods for establishing data-driven hypotheses of key regulatory mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the future directions for data integration that shall facilitate the discovery of epigenetic-based biomarkers and therapies.
  • Kupers, Leanne K.; Monnereau, Claire; Sharp, Gemma C.; Yousefi, Paul; Salas, Lucas A.; Ghantous, Akram; Page, Christian M.; Reese, Sarah E.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Czamara, Darina; Starling, Anne P.; Novoloaca, Alexei; Lent, Samantha; Roy, Ritu; Hoyo, Cathrine; Breton, Carrie; Allard, Catherine; Just, Allan C.; Bakulski, Kelly M.; Holloway, John W.; Everson, Todd M.; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Huang, Rae-Chi; van der Plaat, Diana A.; Wielscher, Matthias; Merid, Simon Kebede; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; Rezwan, Faisal; Lahti, Jari; van Dongen, Jenny; Langie, Sabine A. S.; Richardson, Tom G.; Magnus, Maria C.; Nohr, Ellen A.; Xu, Zongli; Duijts, Liesbeth; Zhao, Shanshan; Zhang, Weiming; Plusquin, Michelle; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Solomon, Olivia; Heimovaara, Joosje H.; Jima, Dereje D.; Gao, Lu; Bustamante, Mariona; Perron, Patrice; Wright, Robert O.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Zhang, Hongmei; Karagas, Margaret R.; Gehring, Ulrike; Marsit, Carmen J.; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Vonk, Judith M.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Bergstrom, Anna; Ortqvist, Anne K.; Ewart, Susan; Villa, Pia M.; Moore, Sophie E.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Standaert, Arnout R. L.; Haberg, Siri E.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Taylor, Jack A.; Räikkönen, Katri; Yang, Ivana; Kechris, Katerina; Nawrot, Tim S.; Silver, Matt J.; Gong, Yun Yun; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kogevinas, Manolis; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Huen, Karen; Mbarek, Hamdi; Maguire, Rachel L.; Dwyer, Terence; Vrijheid, Martine; Bouchard, Luigi; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Croen, Lisa A.; Karmaus, Wilfried; Anderson, Denise; de Vries, Maaike; Sebert, Sylvain; Kere, Juha; Karlsson, Robert; Arshad, Syed Hasan; Hämäläinen, Esa; Routledge, Michael N.; Boomsma, Dorret; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Govarts, Eva; Moisse, Matthieu; Fallin, M. Daniele; Melen, Erik; Prentice, Andrew M.; Kajantie, Eero; Almqvist, Catarina; Oken, Emily; Dabelea, Dana; Boezen, H. Marike; Melton, Phillip E.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Trevisi, Letizia; Hivert, Marie-France; Sunyer, Jordi; Munthe-Kaas, Monica C.; Murphy, Susan K.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Wiemels, Joseph; Holland, Nina; Herceg, Zdenko; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Smith, George Davey; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Lie, Rolv T.; Nystad, Wenche; London, Stephanie J.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Relton, Caroline L.; Snieder, Harold; Felix, Janine F. (2019)
    Birthweight is associated with health outcomes across the life course, DNA methylation may be an underlying mechanism. In this meta-analysis of epigenome-wide association studies of 8,825 neonates from 24 birth cohorts in the Pregnancy And Childhood Epigenetics Consortium, we find that DNA methylation in neonatal blood is associated with birthweight at 914 sites, with a difference in birthweight ranging from -183 to 178 grams per 10% increase in methylation (P-Bonferroni <1.06 x 10(-7)). In additional analyses in 7,278 participants,
  • Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; Liu, Mengzhen; Jackson, Victoria E.; Barnes, Daniel R.; Datta, Gargi; Melbourne, Carl A.; Young, Robin; Batini, Chiara; Surendran, Praveen; Jiang, Tao; Adnan, Sheikh Daud; Afaq, Saima; Agrawal, Arpana; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Baumbach, Clemens; Bierut, Laura; Bertelsen, Sarah; Boehnke, Michael; Bots, Michiel L.; Brazel, David M.; Chambers, John C.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chu; Corley, Janie; Chou, Yi-Ling; David, Sean P.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Leeuw, Christiaan A.; Dennis, Joe G.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Eaton, Charles; Elliott, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Faul, Jessica D.; Foroud, Tatiana; Goate, Alison; Gong, Jian; Grabe, Hans J.; Haessler, Jeff; Haiman, Christopher; Hallmans, Goran; Hammerschlag, Anke R.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hattersley, Andrew; Heath, Andrew; Hsu, Chris; Iacono, William G.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kapoor, Manav; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L.; Karpe, Fredrik; Kontto, Jukka; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laakso, Markku; Lai, Dongbing; Langenberg, Claudia; Le, Nhung; Lettre, Guillaume; Loukola, Anu; Luan, Jian'an; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Mangino, Massimo; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marouli, Eirini; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Moayyeri, Alireza; Moitry, Marie; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Naheed, Aliya; Nauck, Matthias; Neville, Matthew J.; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; North, Kari; Perola, Markus; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Pistis, Giorgio; Polderman, Tinca J.; Posthuma, Danielle; Poulter, Neil; Qaiser, Beenish; Rasheed, Asif; Reiner, Alex; Renstrom, Frida; Rice, John; Rohde, Rebecca; Rolandsson, Olov; Samani, Nilesh J.; Samuel, Maria; Schlessinger, David; Scholte, Steven H.; Scott, Robert A.; Sever, Peter; Shao, Yaming; Shrine, Nick; Smith, Jennifer A.; Starr, John M.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stram, Danielle; Stringham, Heather M.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thompson, Deborah J.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Tragante, Vinicius; Trompet, Stella; Turcot, Valerie; Tyrrell, Jessica; Vaartjes, Ilonca; van der Leij, Andries R.; van der Meer, Peter; Varga, Tibor V.; Verweij, Niek; Voelzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Warren, Helen R.; Weir, David R.; Weiss, Stefan; Wetherill, Leah; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Yavas, Ersin; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Fang; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Kaixin; Amouyel, Philippe; Blankenberg, Stefan; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J.; Deloukas, Panos; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Ferrario, Marco; Ferrieres, Jean; Franks, Paul W.; Frayling, Tim M.; Frossard, Philippe; Hall, Ian P.; Hayward, Caroline; Jansson, Jan-Hakan; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kee, Frank; Männistö, Satu; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Nordestgaard, Borge Gronne; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sattar, Naveed; Spector, Timothy; Strachan, David Peter; van der Harst, Pim; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Saleheen, Danish; Butterworth, Adam S.; Wain, Louise V.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Danesh, John; Tobin, Martin D.; Vrieze, Scott; Liu, Dajiang J.; Howson, Joanna M. M. (2020)
    Smoking is a major heritable and modifiable risk factor for many diseases, including cancer, common respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Fourteen genetic loci have previously been associated with smoking behaviour-related traits. We tested up to 235,116 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on the exome-array for association with smoking initiation, cigarettes per day, pack-years, and smoking cessation in a fixed effects meta-analysis of up to 61 studies (up to 346,813 participants). In a subset of 112,811 participants, a further one million SNVs were also genotyped and tested for association with the four smoking behaviour traits. SNV-trait associations withP <5 x 10(-8)in either analysis were taken forward for replication in up to 275,596 independent participants from UK Biobank. Lastly, a meta-analysis of the discovery and replication studies was performed. Sixteen SNVs were associated with at least one of the smoking behaviour traits (P <5 x 10(-8)) in the discovery samples. Ten novel SNVs, including rs12616219 nearTMEM182, were followed-up and five of them (rs462779 inREV3L, rs12780116 inCNNM2, rs1190736 inGPR101, rs11539157 inPJA1, and rs12616219 nearTMEM182) replicated at a Bonferroni significance threshold (P <4.5 x 10(-3)) with consistent direction of effect. A further 35 SNVs were associated with smoking behaviour traits in the discovery plus replication meta-analysis (up to 622,409 participants) including a rare SNV, rs150493199, inCCDC141and two low-frequency SNVs inCEP350andHDGFRP2. Functional follow-up implied that decreased expression ofREV3Lmay lower the probability of smoking initiation. The novel loci will facilitate understanding the genetic aetiology of smoking behaviour and may lead to the identification of potential drug targets for smoking prevention and/or cessation.
  • Wurtz, Peter; Wang, Qin; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Tiainen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Tillin, Therese; Hughes, Alun D.; Mantyselka, Pekka; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Salomaa, Veikko; Kivimaki, Mika; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Smith, George Davey; Vanhala, Mauno; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2016)
    BACKGROUND Statins are first-line therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, but their systemic effects across lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acids, and circulating metabolites remain incompletely characterized. OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine the molecular effects of statin therapy on multiple metabolic pathways. METHODS Metabolic profiles based on serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics were quantified at 2 time points in 4 population-based cohorts from the United Kingdom and Finland (N = 5,590; 2.5 to 23.0 years of follow-up). Concentration changes in 80 lipid and metabolite measures during follow-up were compared between 716 individuals who started statin therapy and 4,874 persistent nonusers. To further understand the pharmacological effects of statins, we used Mendelian randomization to assess associations of a genetic variant known to mimic inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase (the intended drug target) with the same lipids and metabolites for 27,914 individuals from 8 population-based cohorts. RESULTS Starting statin therapy was associated with numerous lipoprotein and fatty acid changes, including substantial lowering of remnant cholesterol (80% relative to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]), but only modest lowering of triglycerides (25% relative to LDL-C). Among fatty acids, omega-6 levels decreased the most (68% relative to LDL-C); other fatty acids were only modestly affected. No robust changes were observed for circulating amino acids, ketones, or glycolysis-related metabolites. The intricate metabolic changes associated with statin use closely matched the association pattern with rs12916 in the HMGCR gene (R-2 = 0.94, slope 1.00 +/- 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Statin use leads to extensive lipid changes beyond LDL-C and appears efficacious for lowering remnant cholesterol. Metabolomic profiling, however, suggested minimal effects on amino acids. The results exemplify how detailed metabolic characterization of genetic proxies for drug targets can inform indications, pleiotropic effects, and pharmacological mechanisms. (C) 2016 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.
  • Early Growth Genetics Consortium; Vogelezang, Suzanne; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Leinonen, Jaakko T.; Widen, Elisabeth (2020)
    The genetic background of childhood body mass index (BMI), and the extent to which the well-known associations of childhood BMI with adult diseases are explained by shared genetic factors, are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of BMI in 61,111 children aged between 2 and 10 years. Twenty-five independent loci reached genome-wide significance in the combined discovery and replication analyses. Two of these, located nearNEDD4LandSLC45A3, have not previously been reported in relation to either childhood or adult BMI. Positive genetic correlations of childhood BMI with birth weight and adult BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure and type 2 diabetes were detected (R(g)ranging from 0.11 to 0.76, P-values Author summary Although twin studies have shown that body mass index (BMI) is highly heritable, many common genetic variants involved in the development of BMI have not yet been identified, especially in children. We studied associations of more than 40 million genetic variants with childhood BMI in 61,111 children aged between 2 and 10 years. We identified 25 genetic variants that were associated with childhood BMI. Two of these have not been implicated for BMI previously, located close to the genesNEDD4LandSLC45A3. We also show that the genetic background of childhood BMI overlaps with that of birth weight, adult BMI, waist-to-hip-ratio, diastolic blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and age at menarche. Our results suggest that the biological processes underlying childhood BMI largely overlap with those underlying adult BMI. However, the overlap is not complete. Additionally, the genetic backgrounds of childhood BMI and other cardio-metabolic phenotypes are overlapping. This may mean that the associations of childhood BMI and later cardio-metabolic outcomes are partially explained by shared genetics, but it could also be explained by the strong association of childhood BMI with adult BMI.
  • Wood, Angela M.; Kaptoge, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam S.; Willeit, Peter; Warnakula, Samantha; Bolton, Thomas; Paige, Ellie; Paul, Dirk S.; Sweeting, Michael; Burgess, Stephen; Bell, Steven; Astle, William; Stevens, David; Koulman, Albert; Selmer, Randi M.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Sato, Shinichi; Njolstad, Inger; Woodward, Mark; Salomaa, Veikko; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Yeap, Bu B.; Fletcher, Astrid; Melander, Olle; Kuller, Lewis H.; Balkau, Beverley; Marmot, Michael; Koenig, Wolfgang; Casiglia, Edoardo; Cooper, Cyrus; Arndt, Volker; Franco, Oscar H.; Wennberg, Patrik; Gallacher, John; de la Camara, Agustin Gomez; Volzke, Henry; Dahm, Christina C.; Dale, Caroline E.; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Crespo, Carlos J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Simons, Leon A.; Lagiou, Pagona; Schoufour, Josje D.; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Key, Timothy J.; Strandberg, Timo; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kauhanen, Jussi (2018)
    Background Low-risk limits recommended for alcohol consumption vary substantially across different national guidelines. To define thresholds associated with lowest risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease, we studied individual-participant data from 599 912 current drinkers without previous cardiovascular disease. Methods We did a combined analysis of individual-participant data from three large-scale data sources in 19 high-income countries (the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, EPIC-CVD, and the UK Biobank). We characterised dose-response associations and calculated hazard ratios (HRs) per 100 g per week of alcohol (12.5 units per week) across 83 prospective studies, adjusting at least for study or centre, age, sex, smoking, and diabetes. To be eligible for the analysis, participants had to have information recorded about their alcohol consumption amount and status (ie, non-drinker vs current drinker), plus age, sex, history of diabetes and smoking status, at least 1 year of follow-up after baseline, and no baseline history of cardiovascular disease. The main analyses focused on current drinkers, whose baseline alcohol consumption was categorised into eight predefined groups according to the amount in grams consumed per week. We assessed alcohol consumption in relation to all-cause mortality, total cardiovascular disease, and several cardiovascular disease subtypes. We corrected HRs for estimated long-term variability in alcohol consumption using 152 640 serial alcohol assessments obtained some years apart (median interval 5.6 years [5th-95th percentile 1.04-13.5]) from 71 011 participants from 37 studies. Findings In the 599 912 current drinkers included in the analysis, we recorded 40 310 deaths and 39 018 incident cardiovascular disease events during 5.4 million person-years of follow-up. For all-cause mortality, we recorded a positive and curvilinear association with the level of alcohol consumption, with the minimum mortality risk around or below 100 g per week. Alcohol consumption was roughly linearly associated with a higher risk of stroke (HR per 100 g per week higher consumption 1.14, 95% CI, 1.10-1.17), coronary disease excluding myocardial infarction (1.06, 1.00-1.11), heart failure (1.09, 1.03-1.15), fatal hypertensive disease (1.24, 1.15-1.33); and fatal aortic aneurysm (1.15, 1.03-1.28). By contrast, increased alcohol consumption was loglinearly associated with a lower risk of myocardial infarction (HR 0.94, 0.91-0.97). In comparison to those who reported drinking >0-100-200-350 g per week had lower life expectancy at age 40 years of approximately 6 months, 1-2 years, or 4-5 years, respectively. Interpretation In current drinkers of alcohol in high-income countries, the threshold for lowest risk of all-cause mortality was about 100 g/week. For cardiovascular disease subtypes other than myocardial infarction, there were no clear risk thresholds below which lower alcohol consumption stopped being associated with lower disease risk. These data support limits for alcohol consumption that are lower than those recommended in most current guidelines. Copyright (C) The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.