Browsing by Subject "MENOPAUSE"

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  • Kangas, Reeta; Tormakangas, Timo; Fey, Vidal; Pursiheimo, Juha; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Alen, Markku; Kaprio, Jaakko; Sipila, Sarianna; Saamanen, Anna-Marja; Kovanen, Vuokko; Laakkonen, Eija K. (2017)
    Exosomes participate in intercellular messaging by transporting bioactive lipid-, protein-and RNA-molecules and -complexes. The contents of the exosomes reflect the physiological status of an individual making exosomes promising targets for biomarker analyses. In the present study we extracted exosome microRNAs (exomiRs) from serum samples of premenopausal women (n = 8) and monozygotic postmenopausal twins (n = 10 female pairs), discordant for the use of estrogenic hormone replacement therapy (HRT), in order to see whether the age or/and the use of HRT associates with exomiR content. A total of 241 exomiRs were detected by next generation sequencing, 10 showing age, 14 HRT and 10 age + HRT-related differences. When comparing the groups, differentially expressed miRs were predicted to affect cell proliferation processes showing inactivation with younger age and HRT usage. MiR-106-5p, -148a-3p, -27-3p, -126-5p, -28-3p and -30a-5p were significantly associated with serum 17 beta-estradiol. MiRs formed two hierarchical clusters being indicative of positive or negative health outcomes involving associations with body composition, serum 17 beta-estradiol, fat-, glucose-and inflammatory markers. Circulating exomiR clusters, obtained by NGS, could be used as indicators of metabolic and inflammatory status affected by hormonal changes at menopause. Furthermore, the individual effects of HRT-usage could be evaluated based on the serum exomiR signature.
  • Jelenkovic, Aline; Rebato, Esther (2016)
    Background: Earlier menarche has been related to shorter height and greater obesity-related anthropometric dimensions and blood pressure in women. Boys and girls with earlier maternal menarcheal age (MMA) have shown greater height and body mass index (BMI) in childhood. Aim: To analyse associations of menarcheal age with their own and their children's anthropometric dimensions and blood pressure. Subjects and methods: The sample consisted of 493 women and their children (aged 2-19 years) from Greater Bilbao (Basque Country, Spain). For both generations there is information on 19 anthropometric dimensions, blood pressure and socio-demographic characteristics. Linear regressions adjusted for different covariates were used to analyse the associations. Results: Menarcheal age in women showed the greatest positive associations with iliospinal height and ectomorphy and negative associations with BMI, sum of six skin-folds, endomorphy and mesomorphy. Boys with earlier MMA had greater body heights and breadths, particularly iliospinal height and biacromial breadth (0.10z-score/year; p Conclusion: Children with earlier MMA tend to have greater anthropometric dimensions. Adolescent growth spurt might affect these relationships, at least in girls.
  • Griffiths, Amanda; Kouvonen, Anne; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Vaananen, Ari; Kivimaki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi (2014)
  • Sievanen, Tero; Tormakangas, Timo; Laakkonen, Eija K.; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Seppälä, Toni T.; Peltomäki, Paivi; Sipila, Sarianna; Sillanpää, Elina (2021)
    Simple Summary Lifestyle modifies cancer risk in the general public. How lifestyle modifies cancer risk in individuals carrying the inherited pathogenic gene variants in DNA mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) remains understudied. We conducted a retrospective study with cancer register data to investigate associations between body weight, physical activity, and cancer risk among Finnish Lynch syndrome carriers (n = 465, 54% women). The results of our study indicated that longitudinal weight gain increases cancer risk, whereas being highly physically active during adulthood could decrease cancer risk in men. Further, women were observed to be less prone to lifestyle-related risk factors than men. The results emphasize the role of weight maintenance and high-intensity physical activity throughout the lifespan, especially in men with Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome (LS) increases cancer risk. There is considerable individual variation in LS cancer occurrence, which may be moderated by lifestyle factors, such as body weight and physical activity (PA). The potential associations of lifestyle and cancer risk in LS are understudied. We conducted a retrospective study with cancer register data to investigate associations between body weight, PA, and cancer risk among Finnish LS carriers. The participants (n = 465, 54% women) self-reported their adulthood body weight and PA at 10-year intervals. Overall cancer risk and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk was analyzed separately for men and women with respect to longitudinal and near-term changes in body weight and PA using extended Cox regression models. The longitudinal weight change was associated with an increased risk of all cancers (HR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.04) and CRC (HR 1.03, 1.01-1.05) in men. The near-term weight change was associated with a lower CRC risk in women (HR 0.96, 0.92-0.99). Furthermore, 77.6% of the participants retained their PA category over time. Men in the high-activity group had a reduced longitudinal cancer risk of 63% (HR 0.37, 0.15-0.98) compared to men in the low-activity group. PA in adulthood was not associated with cancer risk among women. These results emphasize the role of weight maintenance and high-intensity PA throughout the lifespan in cancer prevention, particularly in men with LS.
  • Jalava-Broman, J.; Makinen, J.; Sillanmaki, L.; Vahtera, J.; Rautava, P. (2016)
    Objective: To investigate which patient characteristics are associated with the initiation of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in a cohort of Finnish women. Study design: Responses to postal questionnaires distributed to a nationwide, randomly selected cohort of women in 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005 and 2010 were analyzed. The cohort members were aged 40-44 years at the beginning of the study. Information on hormone replacement therapy was received from the national prescription register. Women who started taking HRT between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2011 were included and previous users were excluded from the analysis. Main outcome measures: Initiation of HRT was the main outcome measure. The following explanatory factors for predicting the use of HRT were examined: sociodemographic factors, personality, health behavior, physiological and mental symptoms, chronic diseases and use of psychopharmaceuticals. The associations between starting HRT and the explanatory factors were analyzed with single-predictor and multi-predictor logistic regression models. Results: Factors predicting that a woman would start taking HRT were: living with a partner, weak sense of coherence, BMI less than 30 kg/m(2), heavy or moderate alcohol use, symptoms of hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, climacteric symptoms and use of psychopharmaceuticals. Conclusions: Women with a good sense of coherence can cope with climacteric symptoms without resorting to HRT. Clinicians need to bear in mind the burden of menopausal symptoms on a woman's personal and working life when HRT is being considered. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Virtanen, Irina; Kalleinen, Nea; Urrila, Anna S.; Polo-Kantola, Päivi (2018)
    Objectives: In sleep laboratory studies, the new environment is generally considered to disturb sleep during the first night. However, older women have rarely been studied. Although menopause and hormone therapy affect sleep, their impact on the first-night effect is virtually unknown. Participants: Four groups of women with no sleep laboratory experience: young on hormonal contraceptives (n = 11, 23.1 [0.5] years), perimenopausal (n = 15, 48.0 (0.4] years), postmenopausal without hormone therapy (HT; off-HT, n = 22, 63.4 [0.8] years) and postmenopausal with HT (n = 16, 63.1 [0.9] years). Procedure: A cross-sectional study. Methods: Polysomnography was performed over two consecutive nights and the first-night effect and group differences were evaluated. Questionnaire-based insomnia and sleepiness scores were correlated to sleep variables and their between-night changes. Results: Although sleep in young women was deeper and less fragmented than in the other groups, first-night effect was similar in all study groups. Total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and S1 and S2 sleep increased, and wake after sleep onset, awakenings per hour of sleep, S2 and REM latencies, and percentage of SWS decreased from the first to the second night. Perimenopausal women had more insomnia complaints than other women. Insomnia complaints were associated with more disturbed sleep but not with the first-night effect. Conclusions: A first night in a sleep laboratory elicits a marked interference of sleep architecture in women of all ages, with a carryover effect of lighter sleep on the second study night. Menopausal state, HT use, or insomnia complaints do not modify this effect.
  • Rahkola-Soisalo, Päivi; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna; Mika, Gissler; Hoti, Fabian; Vattulainen, Pia; Ylikorkala, Olavi; Mikkola, Tomi S. (2019)
    Introduction and hypothesisThe impact of estradiol-based hormone therapy (HT) on the incidence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is unknown. Therefore, we compared the use of such HT regimens and tibolone in women with and without SUI.MethodsThe women with a history of SUI operation (N=15,002) were identified from the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the control women without such an operation (N=44,389) from the Finnish Central Population Register. The use of HT was traced from the National Drug Reimbursement Register, and the odd ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for SUI were calculated by using the conditional logistic regression analysis.ResultsThe cases had used any HT more often than the controls. The use of systemic estradiol-only or estradiol-progestin therapy was accompanied by an increased SUI risk (OR 3.8, 95% CI: 3.6-4.0 and OR 2.7, 95% CI: 2.6-2.9 respectively). The use of estradiol with noretisterone acetate showed a higher risk of increase than that with medroxyprogesterone acetate. Age over 55years at the initiation of systemic HT was accompanied by a higher SUI risk increase than that under 55years of age. The use of tibolone, an estradiol + levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device, or vaginal estradiol also increased the risk.ConclusionsThe use of HT regimens may predispose to the de novo development or worsening of pre-existing SUI. Thus, caution is needed when these regimens are prescribed to women with mild stress-related urine leakage or with established SUI risk factors.
  • Vitikainen, Emma I. K.; Thompson, Faye J.; Marshall, Harry H.; Cant, Michael A. (2019)
    Kin selection theory defines the conditions for which altruism or 'helping' can be favoured by natural selection. Tests of this theory in cooperatively breeding animals have focused on the short-term benefits to the recipients of help, such as improved growth or survival to adulthood. However, research on early-life effects suggests that there may be more durable, lifelong fitness impacts to the recipients of help, which in theory should strengthen selection for helping. Here, we show in cooperatively breeding banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) that care received in the first 3 months of life has lifelong fitness benefits for both male and female recipients. In this species, adult helpers called 'escorts' form exclusive one-to-one caring relationships with specific pups (not their own offspring), allowing us to isolate the effects of being escorted on later reproduction and survival. Pups that were more closely escorted were heavier at sexual maturity, which was associated with higher lifetime reproductive success for both sexes. Moreover, for female offspring, lifetime reproductive success increased with the level of escorting received per se, over and above any effect on body mass. Our results suggest that early-life social care has durable benefits to offspring of both sexes in this species. Given the well-established developmental effects of early-life care in laboratory animals and humans, we suggest that similar effects are likely to be widespread in social animals more generally. We discuss some of the implications of durable fitness benefits for the evolution of intergenerational helping in cooperative animal societies, including humans. This article is part of the theme issue 'Developing differences: early-life effects and evolutionary medicine'.
  • Roine, Eija; Sintonen, Harri; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Penttinen, Heidi; Utriainen, Meri; Vehmanen, Leena; Huovinen, Riikka; Kautiainen, Hannu; Nikander, Riku; Blomqvist, Carl; Hakamies-Blomqvist, Liisa; Saarto, Tiina (2021)
    Objective: To investigate long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL) changes over time in younger compared to older disease-free breast cancer survivors who participated in a prospective randomized exercise trial. Methods: Survivors (aged 35-68 years) were randomized to a 12-month exercise trial after adjuvant treatment and followed up for ten years. HRQoL was assessed with the generic 15D instrument during follow-up and the younger (baseline age < 50) and older (age >50) survivors' HRQoL was compared to that of the age-matched general female population (n = 892). The analysis included 342 survivors. Results: The decline of HRQoL compared to the population was steeper and recovery slower in the younger survivors (p for interaction < 0.001). The impairment was also larger among the younger sur-vivors (p = 0.027) whose mean HRQoL deteriorated for three years after treatment and started to slowly improve thereafter but still remained below the population level after ten years (difference-0.017, 95% CI:-0.031 to-0.004). The older survivors' mean HRQoL gradually approached the population level during the first five years but also remained below it at ten years (difference-0.019, 95% CI:-0.031 to-0.0 07). The largest differences were on the dimensions of sleeping and sexual activity, on which both age groups remained below the population level throughout the follow-up. Conclusions: HRQoL developed differently in younger and older survivors both regarding the most affected dimensions of HRQoL and the timing of the changes during follow-up. HRQoL of both age groups remained below the population level even ten years after treatment. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
  • Ellingjord-Dale, Merete; Christakoudi, Sofia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Panico, Salvatore; Dossus, Laure; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Kaaks, Rudolf; Schulze, Matthias B.; Masala, Giovanna; Gram, Inger T.; Skeie, Guri; Rosendahl, Ann H.; Sund, Malin; Key, Tim; Ferrari, Pietro; Gunter, Marc; Heath, Alicia K.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Riboli, Elio; Jose Sanchez, Maria; Chirlaque Lopez, Maria Dolores; Peppa, Eleni; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Martimianaki, Georgia; Agudo, Antonio; Santiuste, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Amiano, Pilar; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Simeon, Vittorio; Berrino, Franco; Tumino, Rosario; Severi, Gianluca; Stocks, Tanja; Turzanski-Fortner, Renee; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Rylander, Charlotta; Aune, Dagfinn; Dahm, Christina C. (2021)
    Background: The role of obesity and weight change in breast-cancer development is complex and incompletely understood. We investigated long-term weight change and breast-cancer risk by body mass index (BMI) at age 20 years, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and hormone-receptor status. Methods: Using data on weight collected at three different time points from women who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, we investigated the association between weight change from age 20 years until middle adulthood and risk of breast cancer. Results: In total, 150 257 women with a median age of 51 years at cohort entry were followed for an average of 14 years (standard deviation = 3.9) during which 6532 breast-cancer cases occurred. Compared with women with stable weight (+/- 2.5 kg), long-term weight gain >10 kg was positively associated with postmenopausal breast-cancer risk in women who were lean at age 20 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.22-1.65] in ever HRT users (HR = 1.23; 1.04-1.44), in never HRT users (HR = 1.40; 1.16-1.68) and in oestrogen-and-progesterone-receptor-positive (ERthornPRthorn) breast cancer (HR = 1.46; 1.15-1.85). Conclusion: Long-term weight gain was positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer in women who were lean at age 20, both in HRT ever users and non-users, and hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer.
  • Toffol, Elena; Kalleinen, Nea; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Partonen, Timo; Haukka, Jari; Polo-Kantola, Paivi (2021)
    Background: Sleep quality typically decreases after menopause, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Concentrations of melatonin are lower and its secretion profiles different before and after menopause. However, whether and how melatonin and sleep architecture are associated in women of different reproductive states have not been examined to date. Methods: Overnight serum melatonin samples were taken from 17 perimenopausal and 18 postmenopausal healthy women. Sleep quality was measured with all-night polysomnography recordings. Results: Melatonin concentrations tended to be the lowest during NREM sleep, and were associated with higher odds of transitions from wake to NREM sleep. The curves of predicted overnight melatonin values from linear mixed models varied according to sleep phases (NREM, REM, Wake) in perimenopausal, but not in postmenopausal women. In perimenopause higher melatonin area under curve (AUC) correlated with higher slow-wave activity (p = 0.043), and higher minimum concentrations with shorter slow-wave sleep (SWS) latency (p = 0.029). In postmenopause higher mean and maximum melatonin concentrations and AUC correlated with lower SWS percentage (p = 0.044, p = 0.029, p = 0.032), and higher mean (p = 0.032), maximum (p = 0.032) and minimum (p = 0.037) concentrations with more awakenings from REM sleep. In the age- and BMI-adjusted regression models, the association between higher maximum (p = 0.046) melatonin concentration and lower SWS percentage remained. Conclusions: The relationship between melatonin and sleep architecture differed in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. After menopause, high melatonin concentrations were associated with worse sleep. Whether these different patterns are related to aging of the reproductive system, and to decrease in menopausal sleep quality, remains to be elucidated. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
  • Pinola, Pekka; Puukka, Katri; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Puurunen, Johanna; Vanky, Eszter; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Hirschberg, Angelica Linden; Ravn, Pernille; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Glintborg, Dorte; Mellembakken, Jan Roar; Ruokonen, Aimo; Tapanainen, Juha; Morin-Papunen, Laure C. (2017)
    Objective: To compare the metabolic profiles of normo- and hyperandrogenic women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) with those of control women at different ages during reproductive life. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Not applicable. Patient(s): In all, 1,550 women with normoandrogenic (n = 686) or hyperandrogenic (n = 842) PCOS and 447 control women were divided into three age groups: <30, 30-39, and > 39 years). Interventions(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, cholesterol, lipoproteins, triglycerides and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Result(s): Both normo- and hyperandrogenic women with PCOS were more obese, especially abdominally. They had increased serum levels of insulin (fasting and in oral glucose tolerance tests), triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol, higher blood pressure, and lower high-density lipoprotein levels independently from BMI compared with the control population as early as from young adulthood until menopause. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was two-to fivefold higher in women with PCOS compared with control women, depending on age and phenotype, and the highest prevalence was observed in hyperandrogenic women with PCOS at late reproductive age. Conclusion(s): When evaluating metabolic risks in women with PCOS, androgenic status, especially abdominal obesity and age, should be taken into account, which would allow tailored management of the syndrome from early adulthood on. (C) 2016 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.