Browsing by Subject "METABOLIC-ACTIVITY"

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  • Forsström, Saara; Jackson, Christopher B.; Carroll, Christopher J.; Kuronen, Mervi; Pirinen, Eija; Pradhan, Swagat; Marmyleva, Anastasiia; Auranen, Mari; Kleine, Iida-Marja; Khan, Nahid A.; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Paivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Wang, Liya; Battersby, Brendan J.; Richter, Uwe; Velagapudi, Vidya; Nikkanen, Joni; Euro, Liliya; Suomalainen, Anu (2019)
    Mitochondrial dysfunction elicits stress responses that safeguard cellular homeostasis against metabolic insults. Mitochondrial integrated stress response (ISRmt) is a major response to mitochondrial (mt)DNA expression stress (mtDNA maintenance, translation defects), but the knowledge of dynamics or interdependence of components is lacking. We report that in mitochondrial myopathy, ISRmt progresses in temporal stages and development from early to chronic and is regulated by autocrine and endocrine effects of FGF21, a metabolic hormone with pleiotropic effects. Initial disease signs induce transcriptional ISRmt (ATF5, mitochondria) one-carbon cycle, FGF21, and GDF15). The local progression to 2nd metabolic ISRmt stage (ATF3, ATF4, glucose uptake, serine biosynthesis, and transsulfuration) is FGF21 dependent. Mitochondria! unfolded protein response marks the 3rd ISRmt stage of failing tissue. Systemically, FGF21 drives weight loss and glucose preference, and modifies metabolism and respiratory chain deficiency in a specific hippocampal brain region. Our evidence indicates that FGF21 is a local and systemic messenger of mtDNA stress in mice and humans with mitochondrial disease.
  • Allkja, Jontana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Coenye, Tom; Cos, Paul; Fallarero, Adyary; Harrison, Joe J.; Lopes, Susana P.; Oliver, Antonio; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Ramage, Gordon; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Stoodley, Paul; Webb, Jeremy S.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Goeres, Darla M.; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe (2020)
    The lack of reproducibility of published studies is one of the major issues facing the scientific community, and the field of biofilm microbiology has been no exception. One effective strategy against this multifaceted problem is the use of minimum information guidelines. This strategy provides a guide for authors and reviewers on the necessary information that a manuscript should include for the experiments in a study to be clearly interpreted and independently reproduced. As a result of several discussions between international groups working in the area of biofilms, we present a guideline for the spectrophotometric and fluorometric assessment of biofilm formation in microplates. This guideline has been divided into 5 main sections, each presenting a comprehensive set of recommendations. The intention of the minimum information guideline is to improve the quality of scientific communication that will augment interlaboratory reproducibility in biofilm microplate assays.