Browsing by Subject "METAGENOMICS"

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  • Mäklin, Tommi; Kallonen, Teemu; Alanko, Jarno; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Hegstad, Kristin; Mäkinen, Veli; Corander, Jukka; Heinz, Eva; Honkela, Antti (2021)
    Genomic epidemiology is a tool for tracing transmission of pathogens based on whole-genome sequencing. We introduce the mGEMS pipeline for genomic epidemiology with plate sweeps representing mixed samples of a target pathogen, opening the possibility to sequence all colonies on selective plates with a single DNA extraction and sequencing step. The pipeline includes the novel mGEMS read binner for probabilistic assignments of sequencing reads, and the scalable pseudoaligner Themisto. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach using closely related samples in a nosocomial setting, obtaining results that are comparable to those based on single-colony picks. Our results lend firm support to more widespread consideration of genomic epidemiology with mixed infection samples.
  • Korpela, Katri; de Vos, Willem M. (2018)
    Microbes colonising the infant intestine, especially bacteria, are considered important for metabolic and immunological programming in early life, potentially affecting the susceptibility of the host to disease. We combined published data to provide a global view of microbiota development in early life. The results support the concept that the microbiota develops with age in an orchestrated manner, showing common patterns across populations. Furthermore, infants are colonised at birth by specific, selected maternal faecal bacteria and likely their bacteriophages. Therefore, infants are adapted to receiving specific bacterial signals, partly derived from the maternal microbiota, at successive immunological time windows during early development. Birth by caesarean section compromises the initial vertical transmission of microbes whereas antibiotic use shifts the microbiota away from the normal developmental pattern. These disruptions alter the microbial signals that the host receives, potentially affecting child development.
  • Korpela, Katri; Costea, Paul; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Segata, Nicola; Bork, Peer (2018)
    Vertical transmission of bacteria from mother to infant at birth is postulated to initiate a life-long host-microbe symbiosis, playing an important role in early infant development. However, only the tracking of strictly defined unique microbial strains can clarify where the intestinal bacteria come from, how long the initial colonizers persist, and whether colonization by other strains from the environment can replace existing ones. Using rare single nucleotide variants in fecal metagenomes of infants and their family members, we show strong evidence of selective and persistent transmission of maternal strain populations to the vaginally born infant and their occasional replacement by strains from the environment, including those from family members, in later childhood. Only strains from the classes Actinobacteria and Bacteroidia, which are essential components of the infant microbiome, are transmitted from the mother and persist for at least 1 yr. In contrast, maternal strains of Clostridia, a dominant class in the mother's gut microbiome, are not observed in the infant. Caesarean-born infants show a striking lack of maternal transmission at birth. After the first year, strain influx from the family environment occurs and continues even in adulthood. Fathers appear to be more frequently donors of novel strains to other family members than receivers. Thus, the infant gut is seeded by selected maternal bacteria, which expand to form a stable community, with a rare but stable continuing strain influx over time.