Browsing by Subject "METASTASIS"

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  • Harma, Ville; Virtanen, Johannes; Mäkelä, Rami; Happonen, Antti; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Knuuttila, Matias; Kohonen, Pekka; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Kallioniemi, Olli; Nees, Matthias (2010)
  • Escala-Garcia, M.; Abraham, J.; Andrulis, I.L.; Anton-Culver, H.; Arndt, V.; Ashworth, A.; Auer, P.L.; Auvinen, P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Beesley, J.; Behrens, S.; Benitez, J.; Bermisheva, M.; Blomqvist, C.; Blot, W.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Bojesen, S.E.; Bolla, M.K.; Børresen-Dale, A.-L.; Brauch, H.; Brenner, H.; Brucker, S.Y.; Burwinkel, B.; Caldas, C.; Canzian, F.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chanock, S.J.; Chin, S.-F.; Clarke, C.L.; Couch, F.J.; Cox, A.; Cross, S.S.; Czene, K.; Daly, M.B.; Dennis, J.; Devilee, P.; Dunn, J.A.; Dunning, A.M.; Dwek, M.; Earl, H.M.; Eccles, D.M.; Eliassen, A.H.; Ellberg, C.; Evans, D.G.; Fasching, P.A.; Figueroa, J.; Flyger, H.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Gapstur, S.M.; García-Closas, M.; García-Sáenz, J.A.; Gaudet, M.M.; George, A.; Giles, G.G.; Goldgar, D.E.; González-Neira, A.; Grip, M.; Guénel, P.; Guo, Q.; Haiman, C.A.; Håkansson, N.; Hamann, U.; Harrington, P.A.; Hiller, L.; Hooning, M.J.; Hopper, J.L.; Howell, A.; Huang, C.-S.; Huang, G.; Hunter, D.J.; Jakubowska, A.; John, E.M.; Kaaks, R.; Kapoor, P.M.; Keeman, R.; Kitahara, C.M.; Koppert, L.B.; Kraft, P.; Kristensen, V.N.; Lambrechts, D.; Le Marchand, L.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Lindblom, A.; Lubiński, J.; Mannermaa, A.; Manoochehri, M.; Manoukian, S.; Margolin, S.; Martinez, M.E.; Maurer, T.; Mavroudis, D.; Meindl, A.; Milne, R.L.; Mulligan, A.M.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Newman, W.G.; Olshan, A.F.; Olson, J.E.; Olsson, H.; Orr, N.; Peterlongo, P.; Petridis, C.; Prentice, R.L.; Presneau, N.; Punie, K.; Ramachandran, D.; Rennert, G.; Romero, A.; Sachchithananthan, M.; Saloustros, E.; Sawyer, E.J.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Schwentner, L.; Scott, C.; Simard, J.; Sohn, C.; Southey, M.C.; Swerdlow, A.J.; Tamimi, R.M.; Tapper, W.J.; Teixeira, M.R.; Terry, M.B.; Thorne, H.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Tomlinson, I.; Troester, M.A.; Truong, T.; Turnbull, C.; Vachon, C.M.; van der Kolk, L.E.; Wang, Q.; Winqvist, R.; Wolk, A.; Yang, X.R.; Ziogas, A.; Pharoah, P.D.P.; Hall, P.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Bader, G.D.; Dörk, T.; Easton, D.F.; Canisius, S.; Schmidt, M.K. (2020)
    Identifying the underlying genetic drivers of the heritability of breast cancer prognosis remains elusive. We adapt a network-based approach to handle underpowered complex datasets to provide new insights into the potential function of germline variants in breast cancer prognosis. This network-based analysis studies similar to 7.3 million variants in 84,457 breast cancer patients in relation to breast cancer survival and confirms the results on 12,381 independent patients. Aggregating the prognostic effects of genetic variants across multiple genes, we identify four gene modules associated with survival in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and one in ER-positive disease. The modules show biological enrichment for cancer-related processes such as G-alpha signaling, circadian clock, angiogenesis, and Rho-GTPases in apoptosis.
  • Moyano-Galceran, Lidia; Pietila, Elina A.; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Corvigno, Sara; Hjerpe, Elisabet; Bulanova, Daria; Joneborg, Ulrika; Alkasalias, Twana; Miki, Yuichiro; Yashiro, Masakazu; Chernenko, Anastasiya; Jukonen, Joonas; Singh, Madhurendra; Dahlstrand, Hanna; Carlson, Joseph W.; Lehti, Kaisa (2020)
    Metastatic cancers commonly activate adaptive chemotherapy resistance, attributed to both microenvironment-dependent phenotypic plasticity and genetic characteristics of cancer cells. However, the contribution of chemotherapy itself to the non-genetic resistance mechanisms was long neglected. Using high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) patient material and cell lines, we describe here an unexpectedly robust cisplatin and carboplatin chemotherapy-induced ERK1/2-RSK1/2-EphA2-GPRC5A signaling switch associated with cancer cell intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance. Mechanistically, pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of RSK1/2 prevented oncogenic EphA2-S897 phosphorylation and EphA2-GPRC5A co-regulation, thereby facilitating a signaling shift to the canonical tumor-suppressive tyrosine phosphorylation and consequent downregulation of EphA2. In combination with platinum, RSK inhibitors effectively sensitized even the most platinum-resistant EphA2(high), GPRC5A(high) cells to the therapy-induced apoptosis. In HGSC patient tumors, this orphan receptor GPRC5A was expressed exclusively in cancer cells and associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor survival. Our results reveal a kinase signaling pathway uniquely activated by platinum to elicit adaptive resistance. They further identify GPRC5A as a marker for abysmal HGSC outcome and putative vulnerability of the chemo-resistant cells to RSK1/2-EphA2-pS897 pathway inhibition.
  • PanScan PanC4 consortia; Walsh, Naomi; Zhang, Han; Männistö, Satu; Weiderpass, Elisabete (2019)
    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify associations of individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with cancer risk but usually only explain a fraction of the inherited variability. Pathway analysis of genetic variants is a powerful tool to identify networks of susceptibility genes. Methods We conducted a large agnostic pathway-based meta-analysis of GWAS data using the summary-based adaptive rank truncated product method to identify gene sets and pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in 9040 cases and 12 496 controls. We performed expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis and functional annotation of the top SNPs in genes contributing to the top associated pathways and gene sets. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified 14 pathways and gene sets associated with PDAC at a false discovery rate of less than 0.05. After Bonferroni correction (P Conclusion Our agnostic pathway and gene set analysis integrated with functional annotation and eQTL analysis provides insight into genes and pathways that may be biologically relevant for risk of PDAC, including those not previously identified.
  • Sobral-Leite, Marcelo; Wesseling, Jelle; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Sanders, Joyce; Hofland, Ingrid; Blows, Fiona M.; Coulson, Penny; Patrycja, Gazinska; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkila, Paivi; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Visscher, Daniel; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van de Water, Bob; Broeks, Annegien; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; de Graauw, Marjo; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; kConFab AOCS Investigators (2015)
    Background: Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a protein related with the carcinogenesis process and metastasis formation in many tumors. However, little is known about the prognostic value of ANXA1 in breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between ANXA1 expression, BRCA1/2 germline carriership, specific tumor subtypes and survival in breast cancer patients. Methods: Clinical-pathological information and follow-up data were collected from nine breast cancer studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (n = 5,752) and from one study of familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 107). ANXA1 expression was scored based on the percentage of immunohistochemical staining in tumor cells. Survival analyses were performed using a multivariable Cox model. Results: The frequency of ANXA1 positive tumors was higher in familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations than in BCAC patients, with 48.6 % versus 12.4 %, respectively; P <0.0001. ANXA1 was also highly expressed in BCAC tumors that were poorly differentiated, triple negative, EGFR-CK5/6 positive or had developed in patients at a young age. In the first 5 years of follow-up, patients with ANXA1 positive tumors had a worse breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) than ANXA1 negative (HRadj = 1.35; 95 % CI = 1.05-1.73), but the association weakened after 10 years (HRadj = 1.13; 95 % CI = 0.91-1.40). ANXA1 was a significant independent predictor of survival in HER2+ patients (10-years BCSS: HRadj = 1.70; 95 % CI = 1.17-2.45). Conclusions: ANXA1 is overexpressed in familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations and correlated with poor prognosis features: triple negative and poorly differentiated tumors. ANXA1 might be a biomarker candidate for breast cancer survival prediction in high risk groups such as HER2+ cases.
  • Kinnunen, P. T. T.; Murtola, T. J.; Talala, K.; Taari, K.; Tammela, T. L. J.; Auvinen, A. (2019)
    PurposeAnticoagulants may reduce mortality of cancer patients, though the evidence remains controversial. We studied the association between different anticoagulants and cancer death.MethodsAll anticoagulant use during 1995-2015 was analyzed among 75,336 men in the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer. Men with prevalent cancer were excluded. Multivariable Cox regression was performed to compare risk of death from any cancer and disease-specific death from 9 specific cancer types between (1) anticoagulant users overall and (2) warfarin users compared to anticoagulant non-users and (3) warfarin or (4) low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) compared to users of other anticoagulants. Medication use was analyzed as time-dependent variable to minimize immortal time bias. 1-, 2- and 3-year lag-time analyses were performed.ResultsDuring a median follow-up of 17.2years, a total of 27,233 men died of whom 8033 with cancer as the primary cause of death. In total, 32,628 men (43%) used anticoagulants. Any anticoagulant use was associated with an increased risk of cancer death (HR=2.50, 95% CI 2.37-2.64) compared to non-users. Risk was similar independent of the amount, duration, or intensity of use. The risk increase was observed both among warfarin and LMWH users, although not as strong in warfarin users. Additionally, cancer-specific risks of death were similar to overall cancer mortality in all anticoagulant categories.ConclusionOur study does not support reduced cancer mortality among anticoagulant users. Future studies on drug use and cancer mortality should be adjusted for anticoagulants as they are associated with significantly higher risk of cancer death.
  • Choueiri, Toni K.; Escudier, Bernard; Powles, Thomas; Tannir, Nizar M.; Mainwaring, Paul N.; Rini, Brian I.; Hammers, Hans J.; Donskov, Frede; Roth, Bruce J.; Peltola, Katriina; Lee, Jae Lyun; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Agarwal, Neeraj; Sternberg, Cora N.; McDermott, David F.; Aftab, Dana T.; Hessel, Colin; Old, Christian Scheff; Schwab, Gisela; Hutson, Thomas E.; Pal, Sumanta; Motzer, Robert J.; METEOR Investigators (2016)
    Background Cabozantinib is an oral inhibitor of tyrosine kinases including MET, VEGFR, and AXL. The randomised phase 3 METEOR trial compared the efficacy and safety of cabozantinib versus the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma who progressed after previous VEGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor treatment. Here, we report the final overall survival results from this study based on an unplanned second interim analysis. Methods In this open-label, randomised phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned (1:1) patients aged 18 years and older with advanced or metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma, measurable disease, and previous treatment with one or more VEGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors to receive 60 mg cabozantinib once a day or 10 mg everolimus once a day. Randomisation was done with an interactive voice and web response system. Stratification factors were Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center risk group and the number of previous treatments with VEGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival as assessed by an independent radiology review committee in the first 375 randomly assigned patients and has been previously reported. Secondary endpoints were overall survival and objective response in all randomly assigned patients assessed by intention-to-treat. Safety was assessed per protocol in all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. The study is closed for enrolment but treatment and follow-up of patients is ongoing for long-term safety evaluation. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01865747. Findings Between Aug 8, 2013, and Nov 24, 2014, 658 patients were randomly assigned to receive cabozantinib (n=330) or everolimus (n=328). The median duration of follow-up for overall survival and safety was 18.7 months (IQR 16.1-21.1) in the cabozantinib group and 18.8 months (16.0-21.2) in the everolimus group. Median overall survival was 21.4 months (95% CI 18.7-not estimable) with cabozantinib and 16.5 months (14.7-18.8) with everolimus (hazard ratio [HR] 0.66 [95% CI 0.53-0.83]; p=0.00026). Cabozantinib treatment also resulted in improved progression-free survival (HR 0.51 [95% CI 0.41-0.62]; p Interpretation Treatment with cabozantinib increased overall survival, delayed disease progression, and improved the objective response compared with everolimus. Based on these results, cabozantinib should be considered as a new standard-of-care treatment option for previously treated patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Patients should be monitored for adverse events that might require dose modifications.
  • Riihimaki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari (2014)
  • Laitinen, M. K.; Stevenson, J. D.; Evans, S.; Abudu, A.; Sumathi, V.; Jeys, L. M.; Parry, M. C. (2019)
    Introduction Chondroblastoma is a rare benign bone tumour that usually occurs in children and young adults. They are cartilaginous tumours arising in the epiphysis or apophysis of a long bone. The tumour is classified as benign, although rare cases of pulmonary metastases have been reported. The aims of this study were to describe clinical, radiographic characteristics of chondroblastoma; to analyse the local recurrence rate and complications associated with surgery. Material and methods This retrospective study included 177 patients, who had been diagnosed with a chondroblastoma in extremity between 1990 and 2015. Results The most common site was proximal tibia 20%, followed by proximal humerus 19%, proximal femur 18%, distal femur 16% and foot 15%. One patient has died of the disease and one patient is alive after being operated for lung metastases. There was local recurrence in 25/177 (14%) patients. The median time to local recurrence was 10 months (range 3-158 months). The most common site for local recurrence was proximal tibia (22.2%). The proximal femur was the location in 32/178 (18%) of the cases. 18/32 (56%) were in the greater trochanter and 14/32 (44%) in the femoral head. The mean age was lower in tumours located in femoral head when compared to the greater trochanter; 19.5 years and 13.9 years respectively (p=0.004). Tumours located in greater trochanter were all curetted without further complications. Local recurrence was seen more often in femoral head tumours, though without statistical significance; 3/14 (21%) and none, respectively (p=0.073). Conclusions Chondroblastoma is a rare benign to intermediate grade bone tumour with a potential to metastasise. Femoral head chondroblastoma is rare, presenting 4.5% of all chondroblastoma cases. Around 50% of the chondroblastoma in femoral head. occur in patients with open growth plates.
  • Pietilä, Elina A.; Gonzalez-Molina, Jordi; Moyano-Galceran, Lidia; Jamalzadeh, Sanaz; Zhang, Kaiyang; Lehtinen, Laura; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Martins, Tomas A.; Gultekin, Okan; Lamminen, Tarja; Kaipio, Katja; Joneborg, Ulrika; Hynninen, Johanna; Hietanen, Sakari; Grenman, Seija; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Carpen, Olli; Carlson, Joseph W.; Lehti, Kaisa (2021)
    Due to its dynamic nature, the evolution of cancer cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) crosstalk, critically affecting metastasis and treatment resistance, remains elusive. Our results show that platinum-chemotherapy itself enhances resistance by progressively changing the cancer cell-intrinsic adhesion signaling and cell-surrounding ECM. Examining ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) transcriptome and histology, we describe the fibrotic ECM heterogeneity at primary tumors and distinct metastatic sites, prior and after chemotherapy. Using cell models from systematic ECM screen to collagen-based 2D and 3D cultures, we demonstrate that both specific ECM substrates and stiffness increase resistance to platinum-mediated, apoptosis-inducing DNA damage via FAK and beta 1 integrin-pMLC-YAP signaling. Among such substrates around metastatic HGSCs, COL6 was upregulated by chemotherapy and enhanced the resistance of relapse, but not treatment-naive, HGSC organoids. These results identify matrix adhesion as an adaptive response, driving HGSC aggressiveness via co-evolving ECM composition and sensing, suggesting stromal and tumor strategies for ECM pathway targeting. Platinum chemotherapy is standard of care in ovarian cancers but treatment resistance commonly develops. Here, the authors show that the extracellular microenvironment is modulated following chemotherapy and the changes in matrix proteins and stiffness alter the cell death response of tumour cells.
  • Carnielli, Carolina Moretto; Soares Macedo, Carolina Carneiro; De Rossi, Tatiane; Granato, Daniela Campos; Rivera, Cesar; Domingues, Romenia Ramos; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Yokoo, Sami; Heberle, Henry; Busso-Lopes, Ariane Fidelis; Cervigne, Nilva Karla; Sawazaki-Calone, Iris; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Telles, Guilherme Pimentel; Minghim, Rosane; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Brandao, Thais Bianca; Castro, Gilberto de; Alejandro Gonzalez-Arriagada, Wilfredo; Gomes, Alexandre; Penteado, Fabio; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Rodrigues, Priscila Campioni; Sundquist, Elias; Salo, Tuula; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Graner, Edgard; Fox, Jay W.; Della Coletta, Ricardo; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco (2018)
    Different regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have particular histopathological and molecular characteristics limiting the standard tumor-node-metastasis prognosis classification. Therefore, defining biological signatures that allow assessing the prognostic outcomes for OSCC patients would be of great clinical significance. Using histopathology-guided discovery proteomics, we analyze neoplastic islands and stroma from the invasive tumor front (ITF) and inner tumor to identify differentially expressed proteins. Potential signature proteins are prioritized and further investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and targeted proteomics. IHC indicates low expression of cystatin-B in neoplastic islands from the ITF as an independent marker for local recurrence. Targeted proteomics analysis of the prioritized proteins in saliva, combined with machine-learning methods, highlights a peptide-based signature as the most powerful predictor to distinguish patients with and without lymph node metastasis. In summary, we identify a robust signature, which may enhance prognostic decisions in OSCC and better guide treatment to reduce tumor recurrence or lymph node metastasis.
  • Dickinson, Amy; Saraswat, Mayank; Syrjänen, Stina; Tohmola, Tiialotta; Silén, Robert; Randén-Brady, Reija; Carpén, Timo; Hagström, Jaana; Haglund, Caj; Mattila, Petri; Mäkitie, Antti; Joenväärä, Sakari; Silén, Suvi (2020)
    Background The surrogate immunohistochemical marker, p16INK4a, is used in clinical practice to determine the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) status of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC). With a specificity of 83%, this will misclassify some patients compared with direct HPV testing. Patients who are p16INK4a-positive but HPV DNA-negative, or RNA-negative, may be unsuitable for treatment de-escalation aimed at reducing treatment-related side effects. We aimed to identify cost-effective serum markers to improve decision making for patients at risk of misclassification by p16INK4a alone. Methods Serum proteins from pre-treatment samples of 36 patients with OPSCC were identified and quantified using label-free mass spectrometry-based proteomics. HPV-status was determined using p16INK4a/HPV DNA and E6/E7 mRNA. Serum protein expressions were compared between groups of patients according to HPV status, using the unpaired t-test with a Benjamini-Hochberg correction. ROC curves (AUC) were calculated with SPSS (v25). Results Of 174 serum proteins identified, complement component C7 (C7), apolipoprotein F (ApoF) and galectin-3-Binding Protein (LGALS3BP) significantly differed between HPV-positive and -negative tumors (AUC ranging from 0.84–0.87). ApoF levels were more than twice as high in the E6/E7 mRNA HPV-positive group than HPV-negative. Conclusions Serum C7, ApoF and LGALS3BP levels discriminate between HPV-positive and HPV-negative OPSCC. Further studies are needed to validate these host immunity-related proteins as markers for HPV-associated OPSCC.
  • Alabi, Rasheed Omobolaji; Elmusrati, Mohammed; Sawazaki-Calone, Iris; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Haglund, Caj; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Mäkitie, Antti A.; Salo, Tuula; Almangush, Alhadi; Leivo, Ilmo (2020)
    Background: The proper estimate of the risk of recurrences in early-stage oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is mandatory for individual treatment-decision making. However, this remains a challenge even for experienced multidisciplinary centers. Objectives: We compared the performance of four machine learning (ML) algorithms for predicting the risk of locoregional recurrences in patients with OTSCC. These algorithms were Support Vector Machine (SVM), Naive Bayes (NB), Boosted Decision Tree (BDT), and Decision Forest (DF). Materials and methods: The study cohort comprised 311 cases from the five University Hospitals in Finland and A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, Brazil. For comparison of the algorithms, we used the harmonic mean of precision and recall called F1 score, specificity, and accuracy values. These algorithms and their corresponding permutation feature importance (PFI) with the input parameters were externally tested on 59 new cases. Furthermore, we compared the performance of the algorithm that showed the highest prediction accuracy with the prognostic significance of depth of invasion (DOI). Results: The results showed that the average specificity of all the algorithms was 71% The SVM showed an accuracy of 68% and F1 score of 0.63, NB an accuracy of 70% and F1 score of 0.64, BDT an accuracy of 81% and F1 score of 0.78, and DF an accuracy of 78% and F1 score of 0.70. Additionally, these algorithms outperformed the DOI-based approach, which gave an accuracy of 63%. With PFI-analysis, there was no significant difference in the overall accuracies of three of the algorithms; PFI-BDT accuracy increased to 83.1%, PFI-DF increased to 80%, PFI-SVM decreased to 64.4%, while PFI-NB accuracy increased significantly to 81.4%. Conclusions: Our findings show that the best classification accuracy was achieved with the boosted decision tree algorithm. Additionally, these algorithms outperformed the DOI-based approach. Furthermore, with few parameters identified in the PFI analysis, ML technique still showed the ability to predict locoregional recurrence. The application of boosted decision tree machine learning algorithm can stratify OTSCC patients and thus aid in their individual treatment planning.
  • Koledova, Zuzana; Howard, Beatrice A.; Englund, Johanna; Bach, Karsten; Bentires-Alj, Mohammed; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva (2018)
    The European Network for Breast Development and Cancer (ENBDC), a worldwide network (http://www.enbdc.org/), celebrated its tenth anniversary with a fantastic meeting last March 15-17, 2018 in Weggis with 76 attendees.
  • Sanz, Dafne Jacome; Raivola, Juuli; Karvonen, Hanna; Arjama, Mariliina; Barker, Harlan; Murumägi, Astrid; Ungureanu, Daniela (2021)
    Simple Summary Ovarian cancer (OC) is known for its poor prognosis, due to the absence of reliable biomarkers and its late diagnosis, since the early-stage disease is almost asymptomatic. Lipid metabolism plays an important role in OC progression due to the development of omental metastasis in the abdominal cavity. The aim of our study was to assess the therapeutic role of various enzymes involved in lipid metabolism regulation or synthesis, in different subtypes of OC represented by cell lines as well as patient-derived cancer cell cultures (PDCs). We show that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a cholesterol-regulating enzyme, plays a pro-survival role in OC and targeting its expression impairs cancer cell growth. We also tested a small library of metabolic and mTOR-targeting drugs to identify drug vulnerabilities specific to various subtypes of OC. Our results show that in OC cell lines and PDCs the second generation of mTOR inhibitors such as AZD8055, vistusertib, dactolisib and sapanisertib, have higher cytotoxic activity compared to the first generation mTOR inhibitors such as rapalogs. These results suggest that, in the era of precision medicine, it is possible to target the metabolic pathway in OC and identify subtype-specific drug vulnerabilities that could be advanced to the clinic. Background: Dysregulated lipid metabolism is emerging as a hallmark in several malignancies, including ovarian cancer (OC). Specifically, metastatic OC is highly dependent on lipid-rich omentum. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic value of targeting lipid metabolism in OC. For this purpose, we studied the role of PCSK9, a cholesterol-regulating enzyme, in OC cell survival and its downstream signaling. We also investigated the cytotoxic efficacy of a small library of metabolic (n = 11) and mTOR (n = 10) inhibitors using OC cell lines (n = 8) and ex vivo patient-derived cell cultures (PDCs, n = 5) to identify clinically suitable drug vulnerabilities. Targeting PCSK9 expression with siRNA or PCSK9 specific inhibitor (PF-06446846) impaired OC cell survival. In addition, overexpression of PCSK9 induced robust AKT phosphorylation along with increased expression of ERK1/2 and MEK1/2, suggesting a pro-survival role of PCSK9 in OC cells. Moreover, our drug testing revealed marked differences in cytotoxic responses to drugs targeting metabolic pathways of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and low-grade serous ovarian cancer (LGSOC) PDCs. Our results show that targeting PCSK9 expression could impair OC cell survival, which warrants further investigation to address the dependency of this cancer on lipogenesis and omental metastasis. Moreover, the differences in metabolic gene expression and drug responses of OC PDCs indicate the existence of a metabolic heterogeneity within OC subtypes, which should be further explored for therapeutic improvements.
  • Strauss, Philipp; Marti, Hans-Peter; Beisland, Christian; Scherer, Andreas; Vegard, Lysne; Leh, Sabine; Flatberg, Arnar; Koch, Even; Beisvag, Vidar; Landolt, Lea; Skogstrand, Trude; Eikrem, Oystein S. (2018)
    Novel predictive tools for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) are urgently needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been increasingly investigated for their predictive value, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy archives may potentially be a valuable source of miRNA sequencing material, as they remain an underused resource. Core biopsies of both cancerous and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from patients (n = 12) undergoing nephrectomy. After small RNA-seq, several analyses were performed, including classifier evaluation, obesity-related inquiries, survival analysis using publicly available datasets, comparisons to the current literature and ingenuity pathway analyses. In a comparison of tumour vs. normal, 182 miRNAs were found with significant differential expression; miR-155 was of particular interest as it classified all ccRCC samples correctly and correlated well with tumour size (R-2 = 0.83); miR-155 also predicted poor survival with hazard ratios of 2.58 and 1.81 in two different TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) datasets in a univariate model. However, in a multivariate Cox regression analysis including age, sex, cancer stage and histological grade, miR-155 was not a statistically significant survival predictor. In conclusion, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy tissues are a viable source of miRNA-sequencing material. Our results further support a role for miR-155 as a promising cancer classifier and potentially as a therapeutic target in ccRCC that merits further investigation.
  • Rodrigues, Priscila Campioni; Sawazaki-Calone, Iris; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Soares Macedo, Carolina Carneiro; Dourado, Mauricio Rocha; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Miguel, Marcia Costa; do Carmo, Andreia Ferreira; Lambert, Daniel W.; Graner, Edgard; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Salo, Tuula A.; Coletta, Ricardo D. (2017)
    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) prognosis is related to clinical stage and histological grade. However, this stratification needs to be refined. We conducted a comparative proteome study in microdissected samples from normal oral mucosa and OSCC to identify biomarkers for malignancy. Fascin and plectin were identified as differently expressed and both are implicated in several malignancies, but the clinical impacts of aberrant fascin and plectin expression in OSCCs remains largely unknown. Immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR were carried out in ex vivo OSCC samples and cell lines. A loss-of-function strategy using shRNA targeting fascin was employed to investigate in vitro and in vivo the fascin role on oral tumorigenesis. Transfections of microRNA mimics were performed to determine whether the fascin overexpression is regulated by miR-138 and miR-145. We found that fascin and plectin are frequently upregulated in OSCC samples and cell lines, but only fascin overexpression is an independent unfavorable prognostic indicator of disease-specific survival. In combination with advanced T stage, high fascin level is also an independent factor of disease-free survival. Knockdown of fascin in OSCC cells promoted cell adhesion and inhibited migration, invasion and EMT, and forced expression of miR-138 in OSCC cells significantly decreased the expression of fascin. In addition, fascin downregulation leads to reduced filopodia formation and decrease on paxillin expression. The subcutaneous xenograft model showed that tumors formed in the presence of low levels of fascin were significantly smaller compared to those formed with high fascin levels. Collectively, our findings suggest that fascin expression correlates with disease progression and may serve as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for patients with OSCC.
  • Johns, Scott C.; Yin, Xin; Jeltsch, Michael; Bishop, Joseph R.; Schuksz, Manuela; El Ghazal, Roland; Wilcox-Adelman, Sarah A.; Alitalo, Kari; Fuster, Mark M. (2016)
    Rationale: Lymphatic vessel growth is mediated by major prolymphangiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C) and VEGF-D, among other endothelial effectors. Heparan sulfate is a linear polysaccharide expressed on proteoglycan core proteins on cell membranes and matrix, playing roles in angiogenesis, although little is known about any function(s) in lymphatic remodeling in vivo. Objective: To explore the genetic basis and mechanisms, whereby heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate pathological lymphatic remodeling. Methods and Results: Lymphatic endothelial deficiency in the major heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1; involved in glycan-chain sulfation) was associated with reduced lymphangiogenesis in pathological models, including spontaneous neoplasia. Mouse mutants demonstrated tumor-associated lymphatic vessels with apoptotic nuclei. Mutant lymphatic endothelia demonstrated impaired mitogen (Erk) and survival (Akt) pathway signaling and reduced VEGF-C-mediated protection from starvation-induced apoptosis. Lymphatic endothelial-specific Ndst1 deficiency (in Ndst1(f/f)Prox1(+/CreERT2) mice) was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-C-dependent lymphangiogenesis. Lymphatic heparan sulfate deficiency reduced phosphorylation of the major lymphatic growth receptor VEGF receptor-3 in response to multiple VEGF-C species. Syndecan-4 was the dominantly expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse lymphatic endothelia, and pathological lymphangiogenesis was impaired in Sdc4((-/-)) mice. On the lymphatic cell surface, VEGF-C induced robust association between syndecan-4 and VEGF receptor-3, which was sensitive to glycan disruption. Moreover, VEGF receptor-3 mitogen and survival signaling was reduced in the setting of Ndst1 or Sdc4 deficiency. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate the genetic importance of heparan sulfate and the major lymphatic proteoglycan syndecan-4 in pathological lymphatic remodeling. This may introduce novel future strategies to alter pathological lymphatic-vascular remodeling.
  • Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Kaur, Sippy; Potdar, Swapnil; Khan, Sofia; Netti, Eliisa; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Yadav, Bhagwan; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Saarela, Jani; Bützow, Ralf; Blomqvist, Carl; Nevanlinna, Heli (2021)
  • Seppälä, Miia; Pohjola, Konsta; Laranne, Jussi; Rautiainen, Markus; Huhtala, Heini; Renkonen, Risto; Lemstrom, Karl; Paavonen, Timo; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna (2016)
    Tongue cancer has a poor prognosis due to its early metastasis via lymphatic vessels. The present study aimed at evaluating lymphatic vessel density, relative density of lymphatic vessel, and diameter of lymphatic vessels and its predictive role in tongue cancer. Paraffin-embedded tongue and lymph node specimens (n = 113) were stained immunohistochemically with a polyclonal antibody von Willebrand factor, recognizing blood and lymphatic endothelium and with a monoclonal antibody podoplanin, recognizing lymphatic endothelium. The relative density of lymphatic vessels was counted by dividing the mean number of lymphatic vessels per microscopic field (podoplanin) by the mean number of all vessels (vWf) per microscopic field. The high relative density of lymphatic vessels (aeyen80 %) was associated with poor prognosis in tongue cancer. The relative density of lymphatic vessels predicted poor prognosis in the group of primary tumor size T1-T2 and in the group of non-metastatic cancer. The lymphatic vessel density and diameter of lymphatic vessels were not associated with tongue cancer survival. The relative density of lymphatic vessels might have clinically relevant prognostic impact. Further studies with increased number of patients are needed.