Browsing by Subject "MILD HYPOTHERMIA"

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  • Calabro, Lorenzo; Bougouin, Wulfran; Cariou, Alain; De Fazio, Chiara; Skrifvars, Markus; Soreide, Eldar; Creteur, Jacques; Kirkegaard, Hans; Legriel, Stephane; Lascarrou, Jean-Baptiste; Megarbane, Bruno; Deye, Nicolas; Taccone, Fabio Silvio (2019)
    Background Although targeted temperature management (TTM) is recommended in comatose survivors after cardiac arrest (CA), the optimal method to deliver TTM remains unknown. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of different TTM methods on survival and neurological outcome after adult CA. Methods We searched on the MEDLINE/PubMed database until 22 February 2019 for comparative studies that evaluated at least two different TTM methods in CA patients. Data were extracted independently by two authors. We used the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and a modified Cochrane ROB tools for assessing the risk of bias of each study. The primary outcome was the occurrence of unfavorable neurological outcome (UO); secondary outcomes included overall mortality. Results Our search identified 6886 studies; 22 studies (n = 8027 patients) were included in the final analysis. When compared to surface cooling, core methods showed a lower probability of UO (OR 0.85 [95% CIs 0.75-0.96]; p = 0.008) but not mortality (OR 0.88 [95% CIs 0.62-1.25]; p = 0.21). No significant heterogeneity was observed among studies. However, these effects were observed in the analyses of non-RCTs. A significant lower probability of both UO and mortality were observed when invasive TTM methods were compared to non-invasive TTM methods and when temperature feedback devices (TFD) were compared to non-TFD methods. These results were significant particularly in non-RCTs. Conclusions Although existing literature is mostly based on retrospective or prospective studies, specific TTM methods (i.e., core, invasive, and with TFD) were associated with a lower probability of poor neurological outcome when compared to other methods in adult CA survivors (CRD42019111021).
  • Humaloja, Jaana; Vento, Maximo; Kuligowski, Julia; Andersson, Sture; Pineiro-Ramos, Jose David; Sanchez-Illana, Angel; Litonius, Erik; Jakkula, Pekka; Hästbacka, Johanna; Bendel, Stepani; Tiainen, Marjaana; Reinikainen, Matti; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2021)
    The products of polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation are considered reliable biomarkers of oxidative injury in vivo. We investigated ischemia-reperfusion-related oxidative injury by determining the levels of lipid peroxidation biomarkers (isoprostane, isofuran, neuroprostane, and neurofuran) after cardiac arrest and tested the associations between the biomarkers and different arterial oxygen tensions (PaO2). We utilized blood samples collected during the COMACARE trial (NCT02698917). In the trial, 123 patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were treated with a 10-15 kPa or 20-25 kPa PaO2 target during the initial 36 h in the intensive care unit. We measured the biomarker levels at admission, and 24, 48, and 72 h thereafter. We compared biomarker levels in the intervention groups and in groups that differed in oxygen exposure prior to randomization. Blood samples for biomarker determination were available for 112 patients. All four biomarker levels peaked at 24 h; the increase appeared greater in younger patients and in patients without bystander-initiated life support. No association between the lipid peroxidation biomarkers and oxygen exposure either before or after randomization was found. Increases in the biomarker levels during the first 24 h in intensive care suggest continuing oxidative stress, but the clinical relevance of this remains unresolved.
  • Kirkegaard, Hans; Rasmussen, Bodil S.; de Haas, Inge; Nielsen, Jorgen Feldbaek; Ilkjaer, Susanne; Kaltoft, Anne; Jeppesen, Anni Norregaard; Grejs, Anders; Duez, Christophe Henri Valdemar; Larsen, Alf Inge; Pettila, Ville; Toome, Valdo; Arus, Urmet; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Storm, Christian; Skrifvars, Markus; Soreide, Eldar (2016)
    Background: The application of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for 12 to 24 hours following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been associated with decreased mortality and improved neurological function. However, the optimal duration of cooling is not known. We aimed to investigate whether targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 +/- 1 degrees C for 48 hours compared to 24 hours results in a better long-term neurological outcome. Methods: The TTH48 trial is an investigator-initiated pragmatic international trial in which patients resuscitated from OHCA are randomised to TTM at 33 +/- 1 degrees C for either 24 or 48 hours. Inclusion criteria are: age older than 17 and below 80 years; presumed cardiac origin of arrest; and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) <8, on admission. The primary outcome is neurological outcome at 6 months using the Cerebral Performance Category score (CPC) by an assessor blinded to treatment allocation and dichotomised to good (CPC 1-2) or poor (CPC 3-5) outcome. Secondary outcomes are: 6-month mortality, incidence of infection, bleeding and organ failure and CPC at hospital discharge, at day 28 and at day 90 following OHCA. Assuming that 50 % of the patients treated for 24 hours will have a poor outcome at 6 months, a study including 350 patients (175/arm) will have 80 % power (with a significance level of 5 %) to detect an absolute 15 % difference in primary outcome between treatment groups. A safety interim analysis was performed after the inclusion of 175 patients. Discussion: This is the first randomised trial to investigate the effect of the duration of TTM at 33 +/- 1 degrees C in adult OHCA patients. We anticipate that the results of this trial will add significant knowledge regarding the management of cooling procedures in OHCA patients.