Browsing by Subject "MISMATCH REPAIR"

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  • Gu, Yuexi; Helenius, Mikko; Vaananen, Kristiina; Bulanova, Daria; Saarela, Jani; Sokolenko, Anna; Martens, John; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Sergey (2016)
    Germ-line or somatic inactivation of BRCA1 is a defining feature for a portion of human breast cancers. Here we evaluated the anti-proliferative activity of 198 FDA-approved and experimental drugs against four BRCA1-mutant (HCC1937, MDA-MB-436, SUM1315MO2, and SUM149PT) and four BRCA1-wild-type (MDA-MB-231, SUM229PE, MCF10A, and MCF7) breast cancer cell lines. We found that all BRCA1-mutant cell lines were insensitive to inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) Selumetinib and Pimasertib in contrast to BRCA1-wildtype control cell lines. However, unexpectedly, only two BRCA1-mutant cell lines, HCC1937 and MDA-MB-436, were hypersensitive to a nucleotide analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG). SUM149PT cells readily formed radiation-induced RAD51-positive nuclear foci indicating a functional homologous recombination, which may explain their resistance to 6-TG. However, the reason underlying 6-TG resistance of SUM1315MO2 cells remains unclear. Our data reveal a remarkable heterogeneity among BRCA1-mutant cell lines and provide a reference for future studies.
  • Moller, Pal; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Evans, D. Gareth; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rodland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos Tot Nederveen; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Frayling, Ian M.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Pylvanainen, Kirsi; Sampson, Julian R.; Capella, Gabriel; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Moslein, Gabriela; Mallorca Grp (2017)
    Objective Estimates of cancer risk and the effects of surveillance in Lynch syndrome have been subject to bias, partly through reliance on retrospective studies. We sought to establish more robust estimates in patients undergoing prospective cancer surveillance. Design We undertook a multicentre study of patients carrying Lynch syndrome-associated mutations affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Standardised information on surveillance, cancers and outcomes were collated in an Oracle relational database and analysed by age, sex and mutated gene. Results 1942 mutation carriers without previous cancer had follow-up including colonoscopic surveillance for 13 782 observation years. 314 patients developed cancer, mostly colorectal (n=151), endometrial (n=72) and ovarian (n=19). Cancers were detected from 25 years onwards in MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers, and from about 40 years in MSH6 and PMS2 carriers. Among first cancer detected in each patient the colorectal cancer cumulative incidences at 70 years by gene were 46%, 35%, 20% and 10% for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers, respectively. The equivalent cumulative incidences for endometrial cancer were 34%, 51%, 49% and 24%; and for ovarian cancer 11%, 15%, 0% and 0%. Ten-year crude survival was 87% after any cancer, 91% if the first cancer was colorectal, 98% if endometrial and 89% if ovarian. Conclusions The four Lynch syndrome-associated genes had different penetrance and expression. Colorectal cancer occurred frequently despite colonoscopic surveillance but resulted in few deaths. Using our data, a website has been established at http://LScarisk.org enabling calculation of cumulative cancer risks as an aid to genetic counselling in Lynch syndrome.
  • Abdel-Rahman, Wael M.; Ruosaari, Saila; Knuutila, Sakari; Peltomäki, Päivi T (2012)
  • Pussila, Marjaana; Toronen, Petri; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Katayama, Shintaro; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Holm, Liisa; Kere, Juha; Peltomäki, Paivi; Mäkinen, Markus J.; Linden, Jere; Nyström, Minna (2018)
    Colorectal cancer (CRC) genome is unstable and different types of instabilities, such as chromosomal instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MSI) are thought to reflect distinct cancer initiating mechanisms. Although 85% of sporadic CRC reveal CIN, 15% reveal mismatch repair (MMR) malfunction and MSI, the hallmarks of Lynch syndrome with inherited heterozygous germline mutations in MMR genes. Our study was designed to comprehensively follow genome-wide expression changes and their implications during colon tumorigenesis. We conducted a long-term feeding experiment in the mouse to address expression changes arising in histologically normal colonic mucosa as putative cancer preceding events, and the effect of inherited predisposition (Mlh1(+/-)) and Western-style diet (WD) on those. During the 21-month experiment, carcinomas developed mainly in WD-fed mice and were evenly distributed between genotypes. Unexpectedly, the heterozygote (B6.129-Mlh1tm1Rak) mice did not show MSI in their CRCs. Instead, both wildtype and heterozygote CRC mice showed a distinct mRNA expression profile and shortage of several chromosomal segregation gene-specific transcripts (Mlh1, Bub1, Mis18a, Tpx2, Rad9a, Pms2, Cenpe, Ncapd3, Odf2 and Dclre1b) in their colon mucosa, as well as an increased mitotic activity and abundant numbers of unbalanced/atypical mitoses in tumours. Our genome-wide expression profiling experiment demonstrates that cancer preceding changes are already seen in histologically normal colon mucosa and that decreased expressions of Mlh1 and other chromosomal segregation genes may form a field-defect in mucosa, which trigger MMR-proficient, chromosomally unstable CRC.
  • Awad, Shady Adnan; Kankainen, Matti; Ojala, Teija; Koskenvesa, Perttu; Eldfors, Samuli; Ghimire, Bishwa; Kumar, Ashwini; Kytölä, Soili; Kamel, Mahmoud M.; Heckman, Caroline A.; Porkka, Kimmo; Mustjoki, Satu (2020)
    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm accounting for similar to 15% of all leukemia. Progress of the disease from an indolent chronic phase to the more aggressive accelerated phase or blast phase (BP) occurs in a minority of cases and is associated with an accumulation of somatic mutations. We performed genetic profiling of 85 samples and transcriptome profiling of 12 samples from 59 CML patients. We identified recurrent somatic mutations in ABL1 (37%), ASXL1 (26%), RUNX1 (16%), and BCOR (16%) in the BP and observed that mutation signatures in the BP resembled those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that mutation load differed between the indolent and aggressive phases and that nonoptimal responders had more nonsilent mutations than did optimal responders at the time of diagnosis, as well as in follow-up. Using RNA sequencing, we identified other than BCR-ABL1 cancer-associated hybrid genes in 6 of the 7 BP samples. Uncovered expression alterations were in turn associated with mechanisms and pathways that could be targeted in CML management and by which somatic alterations may emerge in CML. Last, we showed the value of genetic data in CML management in a personalized medicine setting.
  • Fang, Hu; Barbour, Jayne A.; Poulos, Rebecca C.; Katainen, Riku; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Wong, Jason W. H. (2020)
    Author summary Cancer arises through the accumulation of somatic mutations. The way that these somatic mutations form can vary greatly in different cancers. One of the most mutagenic processes that have been identified is caused by mutations within a replicative DNA polymerase known as Polymerase Epsilon (POLE). Cancers with such mutations present with hundreds of thousands of somatic mutations in their genome. Previous cancer genomics studies have identified a number of mutation hotspots in POLE, however how these different POLE mutants behave in affecting mutation distribution has not been studied. Here, we describe the genome-wide mutation profiles of distinct POLE mutant cancers. We find that different mutants indeed result in different mutation profiles and that this can be explained by the different fidelities of these mutants in replicating specific DNA sequences. Significantly, these differences have important implications in cancer formation as we found that a POLE mutation is strongly associated with a specific truncation of the TP53 cancer driver gene. This study furthers our understanding of the POLE mutagenic process in cancer and provide important insights into carcinogenesis in cancers with such mutations.
  • Bruun, Jarle; Sveen, Anita; Barros, Rita; Eide, Peter W.; Eilertsen, Ina; Kolberg, Matthias; Pellinen, Teijo; David, Leonor; Svindland, Aud; Kallioniemi, Olli; Guren, Marianne G.; Nesbakken, Arild; Almeida, Raquel; Lothe, Ragnhild A. (2018)
    We aimed to refine the value of CDX2 as an independent prognostic and predictive biomarker in colorectal cancer (CRC) according to disease stage and chemotherapy sensitivity in preclinical models. CDX2 expression was evaluated in 1045 stage I-IV primary CRCs by gene expression (n = 403) or immunohistochemistry (n = 642) and in relation to 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and chemotherapy. Pharmacogenomic associations between CDX2 expression and 69 chemotherapeutics were assessed by drug screening of 35 CRC cell lines. CDX2 expression was lost in 11.6% of cases and showed independent poor prognostic value in multivariable models. For individual stages, CDX2 was prognostic only in stage IV, independent of chemotherapy. Among stage I-III patients not treated in an adjuvant setting, CDX2 loss was associated with a particularly poor survival in the BRAF-mutated subgroup, but prognostic value was independent of microsatellite instability status and the consensus molecular subtypes. In stage III, the 5-year RFS rate was higher among patients with loss of CDX2 who received adjuvant chemotherapy than among patients who did not. The CDX2-negative cell lines were significantly more sensitive to chemotherapeutics than CDX2-positive cells, and the multidrug resistance genes MDR1 and CFTR were significantly downregulated both in CDX2-negative cells and in patient tumors. Loss of CDX2 in CRC is an adverse prognostic biomarker only in stage IV disease and appears to be associated with benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III. Early-stage patients not qualifying for chemotherapy might be reconsidered for such treatment if their tumor has loss of CDX2 and mutated BRAF.
  • Abdel-Rahman, Wael M.; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E.; Kaur, Sippy; Niskakoski (o.s. Tieva), Anni; Knuutila, Sakari; Järvinen, Heikki; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Peltomaki, Paivi (2016)
    All colorectal cancer cell lines except RKO displayed active beta-catenin/TCF regulated transcription. This feature of RKO was noted in familial colon cancers; hence our aim was to dissect its carcinogenic mechanism. MFISH and CGH revealed distinct instability of chromosome structure in RKO. Gene expression microarray of RKO versus 7 colon cancer lines (with active Wnt signaling) and 3 normal specimens revealed 611 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the tested gene loci were susceptible to LOH in primary tumors with various beta-catenin localizations as a surrogate marker for beta-catenin activation. The immunohistochemistry of selected genes (IFI16, RGS4, MCTP1, DGKI, OBCAM/OPCML, and GLIPR1) confirmed that they were differentially expressed in clinical specimens. Since epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to expression changes, selected target genes were evaluated for promoter methylation in patient specimens from sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. CMTM3, DGKI, and OPCML were frequently hypermethylated in both groups, whereas KLK10, EPCAM, and DLC1 displayed subgroup specificity. The overall fraction of hypermethylated genes was higher in tumors withmembranous beta-catenin. We identified novel genes in colorectal carcinogenesis that might be useful in personalized tumor profiling. Tumors with inactive Wnt signaling are a heterogeneous group displaying interaction of chromosomal instability, Wnt signaling, and epigenetics.
  • Shrestha, Kul; Aska, Elli; Tuominen, Minna; Kauppi, Liisa (2021)
    Tumors of Lynch syndrome (LS) patients display high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI), which results from complete loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR), in line with Knudson’s two-hit hypothesis. Why some organs, in particular those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, are prone to tumorigenesis in LS remains unknown. We hypothesized that MMR is haploinsufficient in certain tissues, compromising microsatellite stability in a tissue-specific manner before tumorigenesis. Using mouse genetics, we tested how levels of MLH1, a central MMR protein, affect age- and tissue-specific microsatellite stability in vivo and whether elevated MSI is detectable prior to loss of MMR function and to neoplastic growth. To assess putative tissue-specific MMR haploinsufficiency, we determined relevant molecular phenotypes (MSI, Mlh1 promoter methylation status, MLH1 protein and RNA levels) in jejuna of Mlh1+/− mice and compared them to those in spleen, as well as to MMR-proficient and -deficient controls (Mlh1+/+ and Mlh1−/− mice). While spleen MLH1 levels of Mlh1+/− mice were, as expected, approximately 50 % compared to wildtype mice, MLH1 levels in jejunum varied substantially between individual Mlh1+/− mice and moreover, decreased with age. Mlh1+/− mice with soma-wide Mlh1 promoter methylation often displayed severe MLH1 depletion in jejunum. Reduced (but still detectable) MLH1 levels correlated with elevated MSI in Mlh1+/− jejunum. MSI in jejunum increased with age, while in spleens of the same mice, MLH1 levels and microsatellites remained stable. Thus, MLH1 expression levels are particularly labile in intestine of Mlh1+/− mice, giving rise to tissue-specific MSI long before neoplasia. A similar mechanism likely also operates also in the human GI epithelium and could explain the wide range in age-of-onset of LS-associated tumorigenesis.