Browsing by Subject "MODEL MEMBRANES"

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  • Poojari, Chetan; Wilkosz, Natalia; Lira, Rafael B.; Dimova, Rumiana; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Petka, Rafal; Kepczynski, Mariusz; Rog, Tomasz (2019)
    1,6-Diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) is one of the most commonly used fluorescent probes to study dynamical and structural properties of lipid bilayers and cellular membranes via measuring steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. In this study, we present a limitation in the use of DPH to predict the order of lipid acyl chains when the lipid bilayer is doped with itraconazole (ITZ), an antifungal drug. Our steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements showed a significant decrease in fluorescence anisotropy of DPH embedded in the ITZ-containing membrane, suggesting a substantial increase in membrane fluidity, which indirectly indicates a decrease in the order of the hydrocarbon chains. This result or its interpretation is in disagreement with the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data. The results of these experiments and calculations indicate an increase in the hydrocarbon chain order. The MD simulations of the bilayer containing both ITZ and DPH provide explanations for these observations. Apparently, in the presence of the drug, the DPH molecules are pushed deeper into the hydrophobic membrane core below the lipid double bonds, and the probe predominately adopts the orientation of the ITZ molecules that is parallel to the membrane surface, instead of orienting parallel to the lipid acyl chains. For this reason, DPH anisotropy provides information related to the less ordered central region of the membrane rather than reporting the properties of the upper segments of the lipid acyl chains.
  • Parkkila, Petteri; Elderdfi, Mohamed; Bunker, Alex; Viitala, Tapani (2018)
    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been used extensively as an effective model of biological membranes, in the context of in vitro biophysics research, and the membranes of liposomes, in the context of the development of nanoscale drug delivery devices. Despite numerous surface-sensitive techniques having been applied to their study, the comprehensive optical characterization of SLBs using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has not been conducted. In this study, Fresnel multilayer analysis is utilized to effectively calculate layer parameters (thickness and refractive indices) with the aid of dual-wavelength and dispersion coefficient analysis, in which the linear change in the refractive index as a function of wavelength is assumed. Using complementary information from impedance-based quartz crystal microbalance experiments, biophysical properties, for example, area-per-lipid-molecule and the quantity of lipid-associated water molecules, are calculated for different lipid types and mixtures, one of which is representative of a raft-forming lipid mixture. It is proposed that the hydration layer beneath the bilayer is, in fact, an integral part of the measured optical signal. Also, the traditional Jung model analysis and the ratio of SPR responses are investigated in terms of assessing the structure of the lipid layer that is formed.
  • Chen, Wen; Duša, Filip; Witos, Joanna Magdalena; Ruokonen, Suvi-Katriina; Wiedmer, Susanne Kristina (2018)
    Our study demonstrates that nanoplasmonic sensing (NPS) can be utilized for the determination of the phase transition temperature (Tm) of phospholipids. During the phase transition, the lipid bilayer undergoes a conformational change. Therefore, it is presumed that the Tm of phospholipids can be determined by detecting conformational changes in liposomes. The studied lipids included 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC). Liposomes in gel phase are immobilized onto silicon dioxide sensors and the sensor cell temperature is increased until passing the Tm of the lipid. The results show that, when the system temperature approaches the Tm, a drop of the NPS signal is observed. The breakpoints in the temperatures are 22.5 °C, 41.0 °C, and 55.5 °C for DMPC, DPPC, and DSPC, respectively. These values are very close to the theoretical Tm values, i.e., 24 °C, 41.4 °C, and 55 °C for DMPC, DPPC, and DSPC, respectively. Our studies prove that the NPS methodology is a simple and valuable tool for the determination of the Tm of phospholipids.
  • Manna, Moutusi; Javanainen, Matti; Monne, Hector Martinez-Seara; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo (2017)
    Extracellular and cytosolic leaflets in cellular membranes are distinctly different in lipid composition, yet they contribute together to signaling across the membranes. Here we consider a mechanism based on long-chain gangliosides for coupling the extracellular and cytosolic membrane leaflets together. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we find that long-chain GM1 in the extracellular leaflet exhibits a strong tendency to protrude into the opposing bilayer leaflet. This interdigitation modulates the order in the cytosolic monolayer and thereby strengthens the interaction and coupling across a membrane. Coarse-grained simulations probing longer time scales in large membrane systems indicate that GM1 in the extracellular leaflet modulates the phase behavior in the cytosolic monolayer. While short-chain GM1 maintains phase-symmetric bilayers with a strong membrane registration effect, the situation is altered with long-chain GM1. Here, the significant interdigitation induced by long-chain GM1 modulates the behavior in the cytosolic GM1-free leaflet, weakening and slowing down the membrane registration process. The observed physical interaction mechanism provides a possible means to mediate or foster transmembrane communication associated with signal transduction. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Rissanen, Sami; Grzybek, Michal; Orlowski, Adam; Rog, Tomasz; Cramariuc, Oana; Levental, Ilya; Eggeling, Christian; Sezgin, Erdinc; Vattulainen, Ilpo (2017)
    Driven by interactions between lipids and proteins, biological membranes display lateral heterogeneity that manifests itself in a mosaic of liquid-ordered (Lo) or raft, and liquid-disordered (Ld) or non-raft domains with a wide range of different properties and compositions. In giant plasma membrane vesicles and giant unilamellar vesicles, specific binding of Cholera Toxin (CTxB) to GM1 glycolipids is a commonly used strategy to label raft domains or Lo membrane environments. However, these studies often use acyl-chain labeled bodipy-GM1 (bdGM1), whose headgroup accessibility and membrane order or phase partitioning may differ from those of GM1, rendering the interpretation of CTxB binding data quite problematic. To unravel the molecular basis of CTxB binding to GM1 and bdGM1, we explored the partitioning and the headgroup presentation of these gangliosides in the Lo and Ld phases using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations complemented by CTxB binding experiments. The conformation of both GM1 and bdGM1 was shown to be largely similar in the Lo and Ld phases. However, bdGM1 showed reduction in receptor availability when reconstituted into synthetic bilayer mixtures, highlighting that membrane phase partitioning of the gangliosides plays a considerable role in CTxB binding. Our results suggest that the CTxB binding is predominately modulated by the partitioning of the receptor to an appropriate membrane phase. Further, given that the Lo and Ld partitioning of bdGM1 differs from those of GM1, usage of bdGM1 for studying GM1 behavior in cells can lead to invalid interpretation of experimental data.
  • Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, Ralf; Vattulainen, Ilpo (2016)
    Biomembranes are exceptionally crowded with proteins with typical protein-to-lipid ratios being around 1:50 - 1:100. Protein crowding has a decisive role in lateral membrane dynamics as shown by recent experimental and computational studies that have reported anomalous lateral diffusion of phospholipids and membrane proteins in crowded lipid membranes. Based on extensive simulations and stochastic modeling of the simulated trajectories, we here investigate in detail how increasing crowding by membrane proteins reshapes the stochastic characteristics of the anomalous lateral diffusion in lipid membranes. We observe that correlated Gaussian processes of the fractional Langevin equation type, identified as the stochastic mechanism behind lipid motion in noncrowded bilayer, no longer adequately describe the lipid and protein motion in crowded but otherwise identical membranes. It turns out that protein crowding gives rise to a multifractal, non-Gaussian, and spatiotemporally heterogeneous anomalous lateral diffusion on time scales from nanoseconds to, at least, tens of microseconds. Our investigation strongly suggests that the macromolecular complexity and spatiotemporal membrane heterogeneity in cellular membranes play critical roles in determining the stochastic nature of the lateral diffusion and, consequently, the associated dynamic phenomena within membranes. Clarifying the exact stochastic mechanism for various kinds of biological membranes is an important step towards a quantitative understanding of numerous intramembrane dynamic phenomena.