Browsing by Subject "MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY"

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  • Cornetti, Luca; Fields, Peter D.; Van Damme, Kay; Ebert, Dieter (2019)
    In the post-genomic era, much of phylogenetic analyses still relies on mitochondrial DNA, either alone or in combination with few nuclear genes. Although this approach often makes it possible to construct well-supported trees, it is limited because mtDNA describes the history of a single locus, and nuclear phylogenies based on a few loci may be biased, leading to inaccurate tree topologies and biased estimations of species divergence time. In this study, we perform a phylogenomic analysis of the Daphniidae family (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Anomopoda) including some of the most frequently studied model organisms (Daphnia magna and D. pulex) whose phylogenetic relationships have been based primarily on an assessment of a few mtDNA genes. Using high-throughput sequencing, we were able to assemble 38 whole mitochondrial genomes and draft nuclear genomes for 18 species, including at least one species for each known genus of the family Daphniidae. Here we present phylogenies based on 636 nuclear single-copy genes shared among all sampled taxa and based on whole mtDNA genomes. The phylogenies we obtained were highly supported and showed some discrepancies between nuclear and mtDNA based trees at deeper nodes. We also identified a new candidate sister lineage of Daphnia magna. Our time-calibrated genomic trees, which we constructed using both fossil records and substitution rates, yielded very different estimates of branching event times compared to those based on mtDNA. By providing multi-locus, fossil-calibrated trees of the Daphniidae, our study contributes to an improved phylogenetic framework for ecological and evolutionary studies that use water fleas as a model system.
  • Haukisalmi, Voitto (2015)
    A checklist of tapeworms (Cestoda) of vertebrates (fishes, birds and mammals) in Finland is presented, based on published observations, specimens deposited in the collections of the Finnish Museum of Natural History (Helsinki) and the Zoological Museum of the University of Turku, and additional specimens identified by the present author. The checklist includes 170 tapeworm species from 151 host species, comprising 447 parasite species/host species combinations. Thirty of the tapeworm species and 96 of the parasite/host species combinations have not been previously reported from Finland. The total number of tapeworm species in Finland (170 spp.) is significantly lower than the corresponding figure for the Iberian Peninsula (257 spp.), Slovakia (225 spp.) and Poland (279 spp.). The difference between Finland and the other three regions is particularly pronounced for anseriform, podicipediform, charadriiform and passeriform birds, reflecting inadequate and/or biased sampling of these birds in Finland. It is predicted that there are actually ca. 270 species of tapeworms in Finland, assuming that true number of bird tapeworms in Finland corresponds to that in other European countries with more comprehensive knowledge of the local tapeworm fauna. The other main pattern emerging from the present data is the seemingly unexplained absence in (northern) Fennoscandia of several mammalian tapeworms that otherwise have extensive distributions in the Holarctic region or in Eurasia, including the northern regions. Previously unknown type specimens, that is, the holotype of Bothrimonus nylandicus Schneider, 1902 (a junior synonym of Diplocotyle olrikii Krabbe, 1874) (MZH 127096) and the syntypes of Caryophyllaeides fennica (Schneider, 1902) (MZH 127097) were located in the collections of the Finnish Museum of Natural History.
  • Lewis, Samuel H.; Salmela, Heli; Obbard, Darren J. (2016)
    Genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster have provided a paradigm for RNA interference (RNAi) in arthropods, in which the microRNA and antiviral pathways are each mediated by a single Argonaute (Ago1 and Ago2) and germline suppression of transposable elements is mediated by a trio of Piwi-subfamily Argonaute proteins (Ago3, Aub, and Piwi). Without a suitable evolutionary context, deviations from this can be interpreted as derived or idiosyncratic. Here we analyze the evolution of Argonaute genes across the genomes and transcriptomes of 86 Dipteran species, showing that variation in copy number can occur rapidly, and that there is constant flux in some RNAi mechanisms. The lability of the RNAi pathways is illustrated by the divergence of Aub and Piwi (182-156Ma), independent origins of multiple Piwi-family genes in Aedes mosquitoes (less than 25Ma), and the recent duplications of Ago2 and Ago3 in the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans. In each case the tissue specificity of these genes has altered, suggesting functional divergence or innovation, and consistent with the action of dynamic selection pressures across the Argonaute gene family. We find there are large differences in evolutionary rates and gene turnover between pathways, and that paralogs of Ago2, Ago3, and Piwi/Aub show contrasting rates of evolution after duplication. This suggests that Argonautes undergo frequent evolutionary expansions that facilitate functional divergence.
  • Takacs, Attila; Zsolyomi, Tamas; Molnar, V. Attila; Jordan, Sandor; Sennikov, Alexander N.; Vincze, Orsolya; Sramko, Gabor (2020)
    At the westernmost distribution of the steppe herbaceous plant, Galatella villosa, in Hungary, Serbia and Ukraine, we recently observed intermediate specimens between this species and its close relative, G. linosyris. We were able to demonstrate the hybrid origin of these individuals by sequencing the biparentally inherited nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS) region and checking additive polymorphism in the hybrids. In addition, examination of the maternally inherited plastid regions (trnH-psbA and trnL-trnF intergenic spacers) revealed that G. villosa is likely to be the maternal parent in the Hungarian and Ukrainian populations and G. linosyris in the Serbian population. The intermediate forms produced only sterile seeds. The alleged hybrid between the above two species has already been described as G. xsubvillosa based on a very brief diagnosis. Still, the analysis of the morphological characters using linear discriminant analyses clearly separated the holotype of G. xsubvillosa from individuals of G. linosyris x G. villosa. The latter appeared to be morphologically intermediate between populations of G. villosa and G. linosyris. Contrary to the originally stated hybrid origin of the type plants of G. xsubvillosa, morphological evidence indicates the involvement of G. divaricata not G. linosyris. The hybrid G. linosyris x G. villosa is thus described here, as a new nothospecies G. xfeketegaborii. This study highlights the power of easily available molecular phylogenetic tools for demonstrating the hybrid origin of plants and illustrates how additive polymorphism can be distinguished from other types of intraindividual polymorphism in nuclear DNA sequences.
  • Liu, Li-Na; Razaq, Abdul; Atri, Narender Singh; Bau, Tolgor; Belbahri, Lassaad; Bouket, Ali Chenari; Chen, Lai-Ping; Deng, Chu; Ilyas, Sobia; Khalid, Abdul Nasir; Kitaura, Marcos Junji; Kobayashi, Takahito; Li, Yu; Lorenz, Aline Pedroso; Ma, Yuan-Hao; Malysheva, Ekaterina; Malysheva, Vera; Nuytinck, Jorinde; Qiao, Min; Saini, Munruchi Kaur; Scur, Mayara Camila; Sharma, Samidha; Shu, Li-Li; Spirin, Viacheslav; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tojo, Motoaki; Uzuhashi, Shihomi; Valerio-Junior, Claudio; Verbeken, Annemieke; Verma, Balwant; Wu, Ri-Han; Xu, Jian-Ping; Yu, Ze-Fen; Zeng, Hui; Zhang, Bo; Banerjee, Arghya; Beddiar, Arifa; Bordallo, Juan-Julian; Dafri, Ahlem; Dima, Balint; Krisai-Greilhuber, Irmgard; Lorenzini, Marilinda; Mandal, Raghunath; Morte, Asuncion; Nath, Partha Sarathi; Papp, Viktor; Pavlik, Jozef; Rodriguez, Antonio; Sevcikova, Hana; Urban, Alexander; Voglmayr, Hermann; Zapparoli, Giacomo (2018)
    Eight new species presented are Calostoma areolatum collected in Wuyishan National Park (China), Crinipellis bidens from Hubei Province (China), Lactifluus sainii from Himalayan India, Inocybe elata from Yunnan (China), Inocybe himalayensis from Pakistan. Specimens previously identified as Massalongia carnosa represent a new species, namely M. patagonica restricted to southern South America. Saprolegnia maragheica is a new oomycete species of fresh water in Maraghe (Iran). Uncispora wuzhishanensis is a new aquatic hyphomycete species. A type specimen of Raddetes turkestanicus was studied and based on this the new combination Conocybe turkestanica, is proposed. Argyranthemum frutescens is a new host for Alternaria alternata and Syzygium cumini for Phyllosticta capitalensis in India. Crepidotus ehrendorferi is confirmed for Hungary and Pluteus leucoborealis for Central Europe, and for the phytogeographical region of Carpaticum. Pseudopithomyces palmicola is shown to occur on grapevine and it is validated by adding a unique identifier. Terfezia fanfani is reported first from Algeria.
  • Hirase, Shotaro; Yamasaki, Yo Y.; Sekino, Masashi; Nishisako, Masato; Ikeda, Minoru; Hara, Motoyuki; Merilä, Juha; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi (2021)
    How early stages of speciation in free-spawning marine invertebrates proceed is poorly understood. The Western Pacific abalones, Haliotis discus, H. madaka, and H. gigantea, occur in sympatry with shared breeding season and are capable of producing viable F-1 hybrids in spite of being ecologically differentiated. Population genomic analyses revealed that although the three species are genetically distinct, there is evidence for historical and ongoing gene flow among these species. Evidence from demographic modeling suggests that reproductive isolation among the three species started to build in allopatry and has proceeded with gene flow, possibly driven by ecological selection. We identified 27 differentiation islands between the closely related H. discus and H. madaka characterized by high F-ST and d(A), but not high d(XY) values, as well as high genetic diversity in one H. madaka population. These genomic signatures suggest differentiation driven by recent ecological divergent selection in presence of gene flow outside of the genomic islands of differentiation. The differentiation islands showed low polymorphism in H. gigantea, and both high F-ST, d(XY), and d(A) values between H. discus and H. gigantea, as well as between H. madaka and H. gigantea. Collectively, the Western Pacific abalones appear to occupy the early stages speciation continuum, and the differentiation islands associated with ecological divergence among the abalones do not appear to have acted as barrier loci to gene flow in the younger divergences but appear to do so in older divergences.
  • Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Pohjola, Pekka; Valkama, Jari; Mutanen, Marko; Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O. (2021)
    Ectoparasites such as louse flies (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) have tendency for host specialization, which is driven by adaptation to host biology as well as competition avoidance between parasites of the same host. However, some louse fly species, especially in genera attacking birds, show wide range of suitable hosts. In the presented study, we have surveyed the current status of bird specific louse flies in Finland to provide comprehensive host association data to analyse the ecological requirements of the generalist species. A thorough sampling of 9342 birds, representing 134 species, recovered 576 specimens of louse flies, belonging to six species: Crataerina hirundinis, C. pallida, Ornithomya avicularia, O. chloropus, O. fringillina and Ornithophila metallica. Despite some overlapping hosts, the three Ornithomya species showed a notable pattern in their host preference, which was influenced not only by the host size but also by the habitat and host breeding strategy. We also provide DNA barcodes for ten Finnish species of Hippoboscidae, which can be used as a resource for species identification as well as metabarcoding studies in the future.
  • Jorissen, Michiel W. P.; Pariselle, Antoine; Huyse, Tine; Vreven, Emmanuel J.; Snoeks, Jos; Decru, Eva; Kusters, Thomas; Lunkayilakio, Soleil Wamuini; Bukinga, Fidel Muterezi; Artois, Tom; Vanhove, Maarten P. M. (2018)
    The Lower Congo Basin is characterized by a mangrove-lined estuary at its mouth and, further upstream, by many hydrogeographical barriers such as rapids and narrow gorges. Five localities in the mangroves and four from (upstream) left bank tributaries or pools were sampled. On the gills of Coptodon tholloni, Coptodon rendalli, Hemichromis elongatus, Hemichromis stellifer and Tylochromis praecox, 17 species of parasites (Dactylogyridae & Gyrodactylidae, Monogenea) were found, eight of which are new to science. Six of these are herein described: Cichlidogyrus bixlerzavalai n. sp. and Cichlidogyrus omari n. sp. from T praecox, Cichlidogyrus calycinus n. sp. and Cichlidogyrus polyenso n. sp. from H. elongatus, Cichlidogyrus kmentovae n. sp. from H. stellifer and Onchob-della ximenae n. sp. from both species of Hemichromis. On Cichlidogyrus reversati a ridge on the accessory piece was discovered that connects to the basal bulb of the penis. We report a putative spillback effect of the native parasites Cichlidogyrus berradae, Cichlidogyrus cubitus and Cichlidogyrus flexicolpos from C. tholloni to the introduced C. rendalli. From our results, we note that the parasite fauna of Lower Congo has a higher affinity with the fauna of West African and nearby freshwater ecoregions than it has with fauna of other regions of the Congo Basin and Central Africa.
  • Wanke, Dominic; Krogmann, Lars; Murillo Ramos, Leidys Del Carmen; Sihvonen, Pasi; Rajaei, Hossein (2021)
    Within Iran, the Zagros Mountains show high biodiversity, with a wealth of endemic species. One of these is the geometrid moth Somatina wiltshirei Prout, 1938, originally described from Iran and Iraq. In the present study, one mitochondrial and up to nine protein-coding nuclear gene regions were used along with a comparative morphological examination to investigate the systematic position of this species. The results support the reclassification of this species as Problepsis wiltshirei comb. nov. Since the original species description is superficial, we provide a re-description supported by rich illustrations of morphological characters and distribution. In addition, Problepsis wiltshirei comb. nov. is reported as a new species for the fauna of Turkey. The importance of the habitat for the conservation of this species is discussed.
  • Vanhove, Maarten P. M.; Briscoe, Andrew G.; Jorissen, Michiel W. P.; Littlewood, D. Tim J.; Huyse, Tine (2018)
    Background: Monogenean flatworms are the main ectoparasites of fishes. Representatives of the species-rich families Gyrodactylidae and Dactylogyridae, especially those infecting cichlid fishes and clariid catfishes, are important parasites in African aquaculture, even more so due to the massive anthropogenic translocation of their hosts worldwide. Several questions on their evolution, such as the phylogenetic position of Macrogyrodactylus and the highly speciose Gyrodactylus, remain unresolved with available molecular markers. Also, diagnostics and population-level research would benefit from the development of higher-resolution genetic markers. We aim to offer genetic resources for work on African monogeneans by providing mitogenomic data of four species (two belonging to Gyrodactylidae, two to Dactylogyridae), and analysing their gene sequences and gene order from a phylogenetic perspective. Results: Using Illumina technology, the first four mitochondrial genomes of African monogeneans were assembled and annotated for the cichlid parasites Gyrodactylus nyanzae, Cichlidogyrus haN, Cichlidogyrus mbirizei (near-complete mitogenome) and the catfish parasite Macrogyrodactylus karibae (near-complete mitogenome). Complete nuclear ribosomal operons were also retrieved, as molecular vouchers. The start codon TTG is new for Gyrodactylus and for Dactylogyridae, as is the incomplete stop codon TA for Dactylogyridae. Especially the nad2 gene is promising for primer development. Gene order was identical for protein-coding genes and differed between the African representatives of these families only in a tRNA gene transposition. A mitochondrial phylogeny based on an alignment of nearly 12,500 bp including 12 protein-coding and two ribosomal RNA genes confirms that the Neotropical oviparous Aglaiogyrodactylus forficulatus takes a sister group position with respect to the other gyrodactylids, instead of the supposedly 'primitive' African Macrogyrodactylus. Inclusion of the African Gyrodactylus nyanzae confirms the paraphyly of Gyrodactylus. The position of the African dactylogyrid Cichlidogyrus is unresolved, although gene order suggests it is closely related to marine ancyrocephalines. Conclusions: The amount of mitogenomic data available for gyrodactylids and dactylogyrids is increased by roughly one-third. Our study underscores the potential of mitochondrial genes and gene order in flatworm phylogenetics, and of next-generation sequencing for marker development for these non-model helminths for which few primers are available.
  • Johnson, Matthew D.; Beaudoin, David J.; Laza-Martinez, Aitor; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Fensin, Elizabeth; Lin, Senjie; Merculief, Aaron; Nagai, Satoshi; Pompeu, Mayza; Setälä, Outi; Stoecker, Diane K. (2016)
    Ciliates from the genus Mesodinium are globally distributed in marine and freshwater ecosystems and may possess either heterotrophic or mixotrophic nutritional modes. Members of the Mesodinium major/rubrum species complex photosynthesize by sequestering and maintaining organelles from cryptophyte prey, and under certain conditions form periodic or recurrent blooms (= red tides). Here, we present an analysis of the genetic diversity of Mesodinium and cryptophyte populations from 10 environmental samples (eight globally dispersed habitats including five Mesodinium blooms), using group-specific primers for Mesodinium partial 18S, ITS, and partial 28S rRNA genes as well as cryptophyte large subunit RuBisCO genes (rbcL). In addition, 22 new cryptophyte and four new M, rubrum cultures were used to extract DNA and sequence rbcL and 18S-ITS-28S genes, respectively, in order to provide a stronger phylogenetic context for our environmental sequences. Bloom samples were analyzed from coastal Brazil, Chile, two Northeastern locations in the United States, and the Pribilof Islands within the Bering Sea. Additionally, samples were also analyzed from the Baltic and Barents Seas and coastal California under non-bloom conditions. Most blooms were dominated by a single Mesodinium genotype, with coastal Brazil and Chile blooms composed of M. major and the Eastern USA blooms dominated by M. rubrum variant B. Sequences from all four blooms were dominated by Teleaulax amphioxeia-like cryptophytes. Non bloom communities revealed more diverse assemblages of Mesodiniurn spp., including heterotrophic species and the mixotrophic Mesodinium Chamaeleon. Similarly, cryptophyte diversity was also higher in non-bloom samples. Our results confirm that Mesodinium blooms may be caused by M. major, as well as multiple variants of M, rubrum, and further implicate I amphioxeia as the key cryptophyte species linked to these phenomena in temperate and subtropical regions.