Browsing by Subject "MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS"

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  • Valori, Miko; Jansson, Lilja; Kiviharju, Anna; Ellonen, Pekka; Rajala, Hanna; Awad, Shady; Mustjoki, Satu; Tienari, Pentti J. l (2017)
    Somatic mutations have a central role in cancer but their role in other diseases such as autoimmune disorders is poorly understood. Earlier work has provided indirect evidence of rare somatic mutations in autoreactive T-lymphocytes in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients but such mutations have not been identified thus far. We analysed somatic mutations in blood in 16 patients with relapsing MS and 4 with other neurological autoimmune disease. To facilitate the detection of somatic mutations CD4 +, CD8 +, CD19 + and CD4-/CD8-/CD19- cell subpopulations were separated. We performed next-generation DNA sequencing targeting 986 immune related genes. Somatic mutations were called by comparing the sequence data of each cell subpopulation to other subpopulations of the same patient and validated by amplicon sequencing. We found non-synonymous somatic mutations in 12 (60%) patients (10 MS, 1 myasthenia gravis, 1 narcolepsy). There were 27 mutations, all different and mostly novel (67%). They were discovered at subpopulation-wise allelic fractions of 0.2%-4.6% (median 0.95%). Multiple mutations were found in 8 patients. The mutations were enriched in CD8 + cells (85% of mutations). In follow-up after a median time of 2.3 years, 96% of the mutations were still detectable. These results unravel a novel class of persistent somatic mutations, many of which were in genes that may play a role in autoimmunity (ATM, BTK, CD46, CD180, CLIP2, HMMR, IKEF3, ITGB3, KIR3DL2, MAPK10, CD56/NCAM1, RBM6, RORA, RPM and STAT3). Whether some of this class of mutations plays a role in disease is currently unclear, but these results define an interesting hitherto unknown research target for future studies. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Mantyla, Teemu; Mantere, Outi; Raij, Tuukka T.; Kieseppa, Tuula; Laitinen, Hanna; Leiviska, Jaana; Torniainen, Minna; Tuominen, Lauri; Vaarala, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana (2015)
    First-episode psychosis (FEP) is associated with inflammatory and brain structural changes, but few studies have investigated whether systemic inflammation associates with brain structural changes in FEP. Thirty-seven FEP patients (median 27 days on antipsychotic medication), and 19 matched controls were recruited. Serum levels of 38 chemokines and cytokines, and cardiovascular risk markers were measured at baseline and 2 months later. We collected T1-and diffusion-weighted MRIs with a 3 T scanner from the patients at baseline. We analyzed the association of psychosis-related inflammatory markers with gray and white matter (WM) volume using voxel-based morphometry and WM diffusion using tract-based spatial statistics with whole-brain and region-of-interest (ROI) analyses. FEP patients had higher CCL22 and lower TGFa, CXCL1, CCL7, IFN-alpha 2 and ApoA-I than controls. CCL22 decreased significantly between baseline and 2 months in patients but was still higher than in controls. The association between inflammatory markers and FEP remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, smoking and BMI. We did not observe a correlation of inflammatory markers with any symptoms or duration of antipsychotic treatment. Baseline CCL22 levels correlated negatively with WM volume and positively with mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity bilaterally in the frontal lobes in ROI analyses. Decreased serum lan association between circulating chemokine levels and WM in FEP patients. Interestingly, CCL22 has been previously implicated in autoimmune diseases associated with WM pathology. The results suggest that an altered activation of innate immunity may contribute to WM damage in psychotic disorders.evel of ApoA-I was associated with smaller volume of the medial temporal WM. In whole-brain analyses, CCL22 correlated positively with mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity, and CXCL1 associated negatively with fractional anisotropy and positively with mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity in several brain regions. This is the first report to demonstrate
  • Li, Zhilin; Korhonen, Emilia A.; Merlini, Arianna; Strauss, Judith; Wihuri, Eleonoora; Nurmi, Harri; Antila, Salli; Paech, Jennifer; Deutsch, Urban; Engelhardt, Britta; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Koh, Gou Young; Flügel, Alexander; Alitalo, Kari (2020)
    Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2), a ligand of the endothelial Tie2 tyrosine kinase, is involved in vascular inflammation and leakage in critically ill patients. However, the role of Ang2 in demyelinating central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune diseases is unknown. Here, we report that Ang2 is critically involved in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Ang2 expression was induced in CNS autoimmunity, and transgenic mice overexpressing Ang2 specifically in endothelial cells (ECs) developed a significantly more severe EAE. In contrast, treatment with Ang2-blocking Abs ameliorated neuroinflammation and decreased spinal cord demyelination and leukocyte infiltration into the CNS. Similarly, Ang2-binding and Tie2-activating Ab attenuated the development of CNS autoimmune disease. Ang2 blockade inhibited expression of EC adhesion molecules, improved blood-brain barrier integrity, and decreased expression of genes involved in antigen presentation and proinflammatory responses of microglia and macrophages, which was accompanied by inhibition of α5β1 integrin activation in microglia. Taken together, our data suggest that Ang2 provides a target for increasing Tie2 activation in ECs and inhibiting proinflammatory polarization of CNS myeloid cells via α5β1 integrin in neuroinflammation. Thus, Ang2 targeting may serve as a therapeutic option for the treatment of CNS autoimmune disease.
  • Haywood, Kirstie L.; Pearson, Nathan; Morrison, Laurie J.; Castren, Maaret; Lilja, Gisela; Perkins, Gavin D. (2018)
    Aim: High quality evidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) can measure the long-term impact of CA. The aim of this study was to critically appraise the evidence of psychometric quality and acceptability of measures used in the assessment of HRQoL in cardiac arrest survivors. Methods: Systematic literature searches (2004-2017) and named author searches to identify articles pertaining to the measurement of HRQoL. Data on study quality, measurement and practical properties were extracted and assessed against international standards. Results: From 356 reviewed abstracts, 69 articles were assessed in full. 25 provided evidence for 10 measures of HRQoL: one condition-specific; three generic profile measures; two generic index; and four utility measures. Although limited, evidence for measurement validity was strongest for the HUI3 and SF-36. However, evidence for reliability, content validity, responsiveness and interpretability and acceptability was generally limited or not available in the CA population for all measures. Conclusions: This review has demonstrated that a measure of quality of life specific to OHCA survivors is not available. Limited evidence of validity exists for one utility measure - the HUI3 - and a generic profile - the SF-36. Robust evidence of the quality and acceptability of HRQoL measures in OHCA was limited or not available. Future collaborative research must seek to urgently establish the relevance and acceptability of these measures to OHCA survivors, to establish robust evidence of essential measurement and practical properties over the short and long-term, and to inform future HRQoL assessment in the OHCA population. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Tietavainen, A.; Gutmann, M. U.; Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Corander, J.; Haeggstrom, E. (2017)
    The control of the human body sway by the central nervous system, muscles, and conscious brain is of interest since body sway carries information about the physiological status of a person. Several models have been proposed to describe body sway in an upright standing position, however, due to the statistical intractability of the more realistic models, no formal parameter inference has previously been conducted and the expressive power of such models for real human subjects remains unknown. Using the latest advances in Bayesian statistical inference for intractable models, we fitted a nonlinear control model to posturographic measurements, and we showed that it can accurately predict the sway characteristics of both simulated and real subjects. Our method provides a full statistical characterization of the uncertainty related to all model parameters as quantified by posterior probability density functions, which is useful for comparisons across subjects and test settings. The ability to infer intractable control models from sensor data opens new possibilities for monitoring and predicting body status in health applications.
  • Okuneva, Olesya; Li, Zhilin; Korber, Inken; Tegelberg, Saara; Joensuu, Tarja; Tian, Li; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina (2016)
    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1) is an autosomal recessively inherited childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by myoclonus, seizures, and ataxia. Mutations in the cystatin B gene (CSTB) underlie EPM1. The CSTB-deficient (Cstb(-/-)) mouse model recapitulates key features of EPM1, including myoclonic seizures. The mice show early microglial activation that precedes seizure onset and neuronal loss and leads to neuroinflammation. We here characterized the inflammatory phenotype of Cstb(-/-) mice in more detail. We found higher concentrations of chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum of Cstb(-/-) mice and higher CXCL13 expression in activated microglia in Cstb(-/-) compared to control mouse brains. The elevated chemokine levels were not accompanied by blood-brain barrier disruption, despite increased brain vascularization. Macrophages in the spleen and brain of Cstb(-/-) mice were predominantly pro-inflammatory. Taken together, these data show that CXCL13 expression is a hallmark of microglial activation in Cstb(-/-)mice and that the brain inflammation is linked to peripheral inflammatory changes, which might contribute to the disease pathology of EPM1.
  • Hokkanen, Laura; Barbosa, Fernando; Ponchel, Amelie; Constantinou, Marios; Kosmidis, Mary H.; Varako, Nataliya; Kasten, Erich; Mondini, Sara; Lettner, Sandra; Baker, Gus; Persson, Bengt A.; Hessen, Erik (2020)
    The prevalence and negative impact of brain disorders are increasing. Clinical Neuropsychology is a specialty dedicated to understanding brain-behavior relationships, applying such knowledge to the assessment of cognitive, affective, and behavioral functioning associated with brain disorders, and designing and implementing effective treatments. The need for services goes beyond neurological diseases and has increased in areas of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, among others. In Europe, a great deal of variability exists in the education and training of Clinical Neuropsychologists. Training models include master's programs, continuing education courses, doctoral programs, and/or post-doctoral specialization depending on the country, with no common framework of requirements, although patients' needs demand equal competencies across Europe. In the past 5 years, the Standing Committee on Clinical Neuropsychology of the European Federation of Psychologists' Association has conducted a series of surveys and interviews with experts in the field representing 30 European countries. The information, along with information from the existing literature, is used in presenting an overview of current and relevant topics related to policy and guidelines in the training and competencies in Clinical Neuropsychology. An option for the way forward is the EuroPsy Specialist Certificate, which is currently offered in Work and Organizational Psychology, and in psychotherapy. It builds upon the basic certificate and complements national standards without overriding them. General principles can be found that can set the basis for a common, solid, and comprehensive specialty education/training, sharpening the Neuropsychologists' competencies across Europe. The requirements in Clinical Neuropsychology should be comparable to those for the existing specialty areas in the EuroPsy model. Despite the perceived challenges, developing a specialist certificate appears a step forward for the development of Clinical Neuropsychology. Recommendations are proposed toward a shared framework of competencies by the means of a common level of education/training for the professionals in Europe. Benchmarking training standards and competencies across Europe has the potential of providing protection against unqualified and ethically questionable practice, creating transparency, raising the general European standard, and promoting mobility of both Clinical Neuropsychologists and patients in Europe, for the benefit of the professional field and the population.
  • Claesson, Tor-björn; Putaala, Jukka; Shams, Sara; Salli, Eero; Gordin, Daniel; Liebkind, Ron; Forsblom, Carol; Summanen, Paula A.; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Groop, Per-Henrik; Martola, Juha; Thorn, Lena M. (2020)
    Background and purpose: Degenerative change of the corpus callosum might serve as a clinically useful surrogate marker for net pathological cerebral impact of diabetes type 1. We compared manual and automatic measurements of the corpus callosum, as well as differences in callosal cross-sectional area between subjects with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls. Materials and methods: This is a cross-sectional study on 188 neurologically asymptomatic participants with type 1 diabetes and 30 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects, recruited as part of the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study. All participants underwent clinical work-up and brain MRI. Callosal area was manually measured and callosal volume quantified with FreeSurfer. The measures were normalized using manually measured mid-sagittal intracranial area and volumetric intracranial volume, respectively. Results: Manual and automatic measurements correlated well (callosal area vs. volume: rho = 0.83, p <0.001 and mid-sagittal area vs. intracranial volume: rho = 0.82, p <0.001). We found no significant differences in the callosal measures between cases and controls. In type 1 diabetes, the lowest quartile of normalized callosal area was associated with higher insulin doses (p = 0.029) and reduced insulin sensitivity (p = 0.033). In addition, participants with more than two cerebral microbleeds had smaller callosal area (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Manually measured callosal area and automatically segmented are interchangeable. The association seen between callosal size with cerebral microbleeds and insulin resistance is indicative of small vessel disease pathology in diabetes type 1.
  • Hotta, Jaakko; Zhou, Guangyu; Harno, Hanna; Forss, Nina; Hari, Riitta (2017)
    Introduction: Many central pathophysiological aspects of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) are still unknown. Although brain-imaging studies are increasingly supporting the contribution of the central nervous system to the generation and maintenance of the CRPS pain, the brain's white-matter alterations are seldom investigated. Methods: In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging to explore white-matter changes in twelve CRPS-type-1 female patients suffering from chronic right upper-limb pain compared with twelve healthy control subjects. Results: Tract-based spatial-statistics analysis revealed significantly higher mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity in the CRPS patients, suggesting that the structural connectivity is altered in CRPS. All these measures were altered in the genu, body, and splenium of corpus callosum, as well as in the left anterior and posterior and the right superior parts of the corona radiata. Axial diffusivity was significantly correlated with clinical motor symptoms at whole-brain level, supporting the physiological significance of the observed white-matter abnormalities. Conclusions: Altogether, our findings further corroborate the involvement of the central nervous system in CRPS.
  • Jokinen, Hanna; Goncalves, Nicolau; Vigario, Ricardo; Lipsanen, Jari; Fazekas, Franz; Schmidt, Reinhold; Barkhof, Frederik; Madureira, Sofia; Verdelho, Ana; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo; Erkinjuntti, Timo; LADIS Study Grp (2015)
    White matter lesions (WML) are the main brain imaging surrogate of cerebral small-vessel disease. A new MRI tissue segmentation method, based on a discriminative clustering approach without explicit model based added prior, detects partial WML volumes, likely representing very early-stage changes in normal-appearing brain tissue. This study investigated how the different stages of WML, from a "pre-visible" stage to fully developed lesions, predict future cognitive decline. MRI scans of 78 subjects, aged 65-84 years, from the Leukoaraiosis and Disability (LADIS) study were analyzed using a self supervised multispectral segmentation algorithm to identify tissue types and partial VVML volumes. Each lesion voxel was classified as having a small (33%), intermediate (66%), or high (100%) proportion of lesion tissue. The subjects were evaluated with detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessments at baseline and at three annual follow-up visits. We found that voxels with small partial WML predicted lower executive function compound scores at baseline, and steeper decline of executive scores in follow-up, independently of the demographics and the conventionally estimated hyperintensity volume on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. The intermediate and fully developed lesions were related to impairments in multiple cognitive domains including executive functions, processing speed, memory, and global cognitive function. In conclusion, early-stage partial WML, still too faint to be clearly detectable on conventional MRI, already predict executive dysfunction and progressive cognitive decline regardless of the conventionally evaluated WML load. These findings advance early recognition of small vessel disease and incipient vascular cognitive impairment.
  • Pietila, Sari; Lenko, Hanna L.; Oja, Sakari; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Pietila, Timo; Mäkipernaa, Anne Marja-Terttu (2016)
    This population-based cross-sectional study evaluates the clinical value of electroretinography and visual evoked potentials in childhood brain tumor survivors. A flash electroretinography and a checkerboard reversal pattern visual evoked potential (or alternatively a flash visual evoked potential) were done for 51 survivors (age 3.8-28.7 years) after a mean follow-up time of 7.6 (1.5-15.1) years. Abnormal electroretinography was obtained in 1 case, bilaterally delayed abnormal visual evoked potentials in 22/51 (43%) cases. Nine of 25 patients with infratentorial tumor location, and altogether 12 out of 31 (39%) patients who did not have tumors involving the visual pathways, had abnormal visual evoked potentials. Abnormal electroretinographies are rarely observed, but abnormal visual evoked potentials are common even without evident anatomic lesions in the visual pathway. Bilateral changes suggest a general and possibly multifactorial toxic/adverse effect on the visual pathway. Electroretinography and visual evoked potential may have clinical and scientific value while evaluating long-term effects of childhood brain tumors and tumor treatment.
  • Maliniemi, Pilvi; Vincendeau, Michelle; Mayer, Jens; Frank, Oliver; Hahtola, Sonja; Karenko, Leena; Carlsson, Emilia; Mallet, Francois; Seifarth, Wolfgang; Leib-Moesch, Christine; Ranki, Annamari (2013)
  • Korpi, Esa R.; Lindholm, Dan; Panula, Pertti; Tienari, Pentti J.; Haltia, Matti (2020)
  • Hatton, Sean N.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Hagler, Donald J.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Rinker, Daniel; Eyler, Lisa T.; Franz, Carol E.; Lyons, Michael J.; Neale, Michael C.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Dale, Anders M.; Kremen, William S. (2018)
    Two basic neuroimaging-based characterizations of white matter tracts are the magnitude of water diffusion along the principal tract orientation (axial diffusivity, AD) and water diffusion perpendicular to the principal orientation (radial diffusivity, RD). It is generally accepted that decreases in AD reflect disorganization, damage, or loss of axons, whereas increases in RD are indicative of disruptions to the myelin sheath. Previous reports have detailed the heritability of individual AD and RD measures, but have not examined the extent to which the same or different genetic or environmental factors influence these two phenotypes (except for corpus callosum). We implemented bivariate twin analyses to examine the shared and independent genetic influences on AD and RD. In the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging, 393 men (mean age = 61.8 years, SD = 2.6) underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. We derived fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), AD, and RD estimates for 11 major bilateral white matter tracts and the mid-hemispheric corpus callosum, forceps major, and forceps minor. Separately, AD and RD were each highly heritable. In about three-quarters of the tracts, genetic correlations between AD and RD were >.50 (median = .67) and showed both unique and common variance. Genetic variance of FA and MD were predominately explained by RD over AD. These findings are important for informing genetic association studies of axonal coherence/damage and myelination/demyelination. Thus, genetic studies would benefit from examining the shared and unique contributions of AD and RD.
  • Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Behrens, Sabine; Goode, Ellen L.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Wang, Qin; Benitez, Javier; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guenel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Menendez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Doerk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Van Dijck, Laurien; Smeets, Ann; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Eilber, Ursula; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J.; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Winqvist, Robert; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Chang-Claude, Jenny (2016)
    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according to estrogen receptor (ER) status, were assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Gene-level associations were assessed based on principal component analysis. Gene expression analyses were conducted using RNA sequencing level 3 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas for 989 breast tumor samples and 113 matched normal tissue samples. SNP rs1905339 (A > G) in the STAT3 region was associated with an increased breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratio 1.05, 95 % confidence interval 1.03-1.08; p value = 1.4 x 10(-6)). The association did not differ significantly by ER status. On the gene level, in addition to TGFBR2 and CCND1, IL5 and GM-CSF showed the strongest associations with overall breast cancer risk (p value = 1.0 x 10(-3) and 7.0 x 10(-3), respectively). Furthermore, STAT3 and IL5 but not GM-CSF were differentially expressed between breast tumor tissue and normal tissue (p value = 2.5 x 10(-3), 4.5 x 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry.
  • Jiang, Xia; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Aschard, Hugues; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Richards, J. Brent; Dupuis, Josee; Ingelsson, Erik; Karasik, David; Pilz, Stefan; Berry, Diane; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Zheng, Jusheng; Luan, Jianan; Sofianopoulou, Eleni; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Albanes, Demetrius; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Yao, Lu; Tang, Weihong; Econs, Michael J.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Voelzke, Henry; Zhou, Ang; Power, Chris; McCarthy, Mark I.; Michos, Erin D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Freedman, Neal D.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Van Schoor, Natasja M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Enneman, Anke; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Booth, Sarah L.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhou, Yanhua; Ripatti, Samuli; Ohlsson, Claes; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Lorentzon, Mattias; Eriksson, Johan G.; Shea, M. Kyla; Houston, Denise K.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt K.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Peacock, Munro; Gieger, Christian; Beekman, Marian; Slagboom, Eline; Deelen, Joris; van Heemst, Diana; Kleber, Marcus E.; Maerz, Winfried; de Boer, Ian H.; Wood, Alexis C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rich, Stephen S.; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; den Heijer, Martin; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Cavadino, Alana; Joshi, Peter K.; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Lind, Lars; Michaelsson, Karl; Trompet, Stella; Zillikens, M. Carola; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Broer, Linda; Zgaga, Lina; Campbell, Harry; Theodoratou, Evropi; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Valdes, Ana M.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.; Mikkila, Vera; Ikram, M. Arfan; Sattar, Naveed; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gundersen, Thomas E.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Butterworth, Adam S.; Danesh, John; Spector, Timothy; Wang, Thomas J.; Hypponen, Elina; Kraft, Peter; Kiel, Douglas P. (2018)
    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that is associated with a range of human traits and diseases. Previous GWAS of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations have identified four genome-wide significant loci (GC, NADSYN1/DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1). In this study, we expand the previous SUNLIGHT Consortium GWAS discovery sample size from 16,125 to 79,366 (all European descent). This larger GWAS yields two additional loci harboring genome-wide significant variants (P = 4.7x10(-9) at rs8018720 in SEC23A, and P = 1.9x10(-14) at rs10745742 in AMDHD1). The overall estimate of heritability of 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentrations attributable to GWAS common SNPs is 7.5%, with statistically significant loci explaining 38% of this total. Further investigation identifies signal enrichment in immune and hematopoietic tissues, and clustering with autoimmune diseases in cell-type-specific analysis. Larger studies are required to identify additional common SNPs, and to explore the role of rare or structural variants and gene-gene interactions in the heritability of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
  • Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Rohanizadegan, Mersedeh; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Eitner, Frank; Snyder, Holly J.; Choi, Murim; Hou, Ping; Scolari, Francesco; Izzi, Claudia; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Savoldi, Silvana; Amoroso, Antonio; Cusi, Daniele; Zamboli, Pasquale; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan; Wyatt, Robert J.; Mucha, Krzysztof; Perola, Markus; Kristiansson, Kati; Viktorin, Alexander; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Thibaudin, Lise; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.; Goto, Shin; Maixnerova, Dita; Karnib, Hussein H.; Nagy, Judit; Panzer, Ulf; Xie, Jingyuan; Chen, Nan; Tesar, Vladimir; Narita, Ichiei; Berthoux, Francois; Floege, Juergen; Stengel, Benedicte; Zhang, Hong; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G. (2012)
  • Feigin, Valery L.; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu; Abate, Kalkidan Hassen; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abdulle, Abdishakur M.; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abyu, Gebre Yitayih; Ahmed, Muktar Beshir; Aichour, Amani Nidhal; Aichour, Ibtihel; Aichour, Miloud Taki Eddine; Akinyemi, Rufus Olusola; Alabed, Samer; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Ansari, Hossein; Anwari, Palwasha; Arnlov, Johan; Asayesh, Hamid; Asgedom, Solomon Weldegebreal; Atey, Tesfay Mehari; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Avokpaho, Euripide Frinel G. Arthur; Azarpazhooh, Mahmood Reza; Barac, Aleksandra; Barboza, Miguel; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L.; Baernighausen, Till; Bedi, Neeraj; Beghi, Ettore; Bennett, Derrick A.; Bensenor, Isabela M.; Berhane, Adugnaw; Betsu, Balem Demtsu; Bhaumik, Soumyadeep; Birlik, Sait Mentes; Biryukov, Stan; Boneya, Dube Jara; Bulto, Lemma NegesaBulto; Carabin, Helene; Casey, Daniel; Castaneda-Orjuela, Carlos A.; Catala-Lopez, Ferran; Chen, Honglei; Chitheer, Abdulaal A.; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Kivimaki, Mika; Meretoja, Atte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; GBD 2015 Neurological Disorders (2017)
    Background Comparable data on the global and country-specific burden of neurological disorders and their trends are crucial for health-care planning and resource allocation. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study provides such information but does not routinely aggregate results that are of interest to clinicians specialising in neurological conditions. In this systematic analysis, we quantified the global disease burden due to neurological disorders in 2015 and its relationship with country development level. Methods We estimated global and country-specific prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) for various neurological disorders that in the GBD classification have been previously spread across multiple disease groupings. The more inclusive grouping of neurological disorders included stroke, meningitis, encephalitis, tetanus, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, migraine, tension-type headache, medication overuse headache, brain and nervous system cancers, and a residual category of other neurological disorders. We also analysed results based on the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a compound measure of income per capita, education, and fertility, to identify patterns associated with development and how countries fare against expected outcomes relative to their level of development. Findings Neurological disorders ranked as the leading cause group of DALYs in 2015 (250.7 [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 229.1 to 274.7] million, comprising 10.2% of global DALYs) and the second-leading cause group of deaths (9.4 [9.1 to 9.7] million], comprising 16.8% of global deaths). The most prevalent neurological disorders were tensiontype headache (1505 9 [UI 1337.3 to 1681.6 million cases]), migraine (958.8 [872.1 to 1055.6] million), medication overuse headache (58.5 [50.8 to 67.4 million]), and Alzheimer's disease and other dementias (46.0 [40.2 to 52.7 million]). Between 1990 and 2015, the number of deaths from neurological disorders increased by 36.7%, and the number of DALYs by 7.4%. These increases occurred despite decreases in age-standardised rates of death and DALYs of 26.1% and 29.7%, respectively; stroke and communicable neurological disorders were responsible for most of these decreases. Communicable neurological disorders were the largest cause of DALYs in countries with low SDI. Stroke rates were highest at middle levels of SDI and lowest at the highest SDI. Most of the changes in DALY rates of neurological disorders with development were driven by changes in YLLs. Interpretation Neurological disorders are an important cause of disability and death worldwide. Globally, the burden of neurological disorders has increased substantially over the past 25 years because of expanding population numbers and ageing, despite substantial decreases in mortality rates from stroke and communicable neurological disorders. The number of patients who will need care by clinicians with expertise in neurological conditions will continue to grow in coming decades. Policy makers and health-care providers should be aware of these trends to provide adequate services.
  • Ollila, Hanna M.; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Arnulf, Isabelle; Hoegl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J.; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel (2015)
  • Siuko, Mika; Kivela, Tero T.; Setala, Kirsi; Tienari, Pentti J. (2018)
    Purpose: To estimate the population-based incidence of acute idiopathic optic neuritis (ON) and analyse its differential diagnosis in patients referred with symptoms suggestive of ON. Methods: Patients with suspected ON referred to the Helsinki University Hospital, serving a population of 1.5 million in Southern Finland, were reviewed between 1st May 2008 and 14th April 2012. Brain and optic nerve magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed within 24 hours in 83% of patients. Results: Of 291 referred patients, 184 (63%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 57-69%) were diagnosed with ON whereas 107 (37%) had another condition. The estimated crude incidence of ON in Southern Finland was 3.0 (95% CI 2.8-3.3) per 100,000 (females, 4.6 and males, 1.4). Mean age was 34years (range 15-61), 76% were female. Two (1%) were diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica. ON as the first demyelinative episode was diagnosed in 108 (59%) patients, and MRI showed demyelinating lesions (MRI+) in 82% (95% CI, 75-89) of them. MRI+ predicted the development of multiple sclerosis (MS): 54% of MRI+vs. 5% MRI-patients were diagnosed as MS during a mean follow-up of 7.7years. The most common differential diagnosis was non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (12%). Six (2%) intracranial compressive lesions were found upon MRI scan. Conclusions: More than a third of patients with symptoms suggestive of ON had another condition. Demyelinative lesions on MRI indicated higher risk of developing MS. We recommend the use of MRI to improve the differential diagnostic accuracy of ON and to identify patients with high risk of MS.