Browsing by Subject "Mediation"

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  • Lång, Sakari (Helsingin yliopisto, 2018)
    Aims: Adolescent sleep is impacted by numerous biological, psychosocial and contextual factors. The sheer number of new elements capable of affecting adolescent sleep has grown steadily, most notably the amount of electronic devices available. In this adolescent-based sample, we first seek to characterize, and secondly investigate the relationship between gaming, and adolescent sleep, depression and anxiety. Methods. Total of 1374 respondents, aged from 15 to 17 years of age, provided sufficient data in SleepHelsinki! Helsinki university research project. The associations between study parameters were analyzed using correlational comparisons and canonical correlations. Gender differences were also evaluated. The relationships between gaming, sleep, depression and anxiety were further studied using mediation model. Results and Conclusions. In our study the adolescents sleep duration averaged 7:10 hours (SD 1:07) which is well under the recommended amount 8-9 hours of sleep per night. Severe restriction of less than 6 hours of sleep existed in 17.3% of respondents. Negative associations between sleep duration and sleep quality were established on depression, anxiety, chronotype, gaming and alcohol consumption. Positive connections were found between good self-control and sleep hygiene. Girls fared systematically worse than their male counterparts: significantly having more severe sleep restrictions, longer sleep onset latency, worse sleep hygiene and sleep quality. The gaming addiction score was found to mediate the effect of both depression and anxiety on total sleep time. The hours of gaming also mediated the effect of anxiety, but not depression. This study confirms many findings indicating both risk factors and protective factors regarding adolescent sleep. The gaming is established as an integral component when examining adolescent sleep – it should be studied in unison with particularly anxiety and depression symptoms.
  • Vainio, Annukka; Kaskela, Jenni; Finell, Eerika; Ollila, Sari; Lundén, Janne (2020)
    The publication of inspection grades at food establishments has been introduced as a way to inform consumers about restaurants' food safety levels. This two-part study explored consumers' perceptions and behavioural intentions raised by the Finnish food safety inspection report Oiva. The first part of the study explored university students' (n = 98) spontaneous perceptions raised by the inspection grade, communicated with a smiley face. Perceptions related to food safety risk and one's own behaviour were most frequent. In the second part, these perceptions were used in testing the full food safety inspection report on a nationally representative sample of the 18–65 years old Finnish population (n = 1513) with a survey-experiment approach. Binary logistic and linear regressions revealed that lower inspection grades were directly associated with increased perceived food safety risk and a behavioural intention not to eat at the restaurant when the effect of perceived food safety risk was taken into account. Information about the risk type moderated the effect of lower inspection grades on perceived risk and behavioural intention. These results underline the importance of providing additional information to consumers about the type of food safety risk.
  • Konttinen, Hanna; van Strien, Tatjana; Männistö, Satu; Jousilahti, Pekka; Haukkala, Ari (2019)
    Background: Emotional eating (i.e. eating in response to negative emotions) has been suggested to be one mechanism linking depression and subsequent development of obesity. However, studies have rarely examined this mediation effect in a prospective setting and its dependence on other factors linked to stress and its management. We used a population-based prospective cohort of adults and aimed to examine 1) whether emotional eating mediated the associations between depression and 7-year change in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and 2) whether gender, age, night sleep duration or physical activity moderated these associations. Methods: Participants were Finnish 25- to 74-year-olds who attended the DILGOM study at baseline in 2007 and follow-up in 2014. At baseline (n = 5024), height, weight and WC were measured in a health examination. At follow-up (n = 3735), height, weight and WC were based on measured or self-reported information. Depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression Scale), emotional eating (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18), physical activity and night sleep duration were self-reported. Age- and gender-adjusted structural equation models with full information maximum likelihood estimator were used in the analyses. Results: Depression and emotional eating were positively associated and they both predicted higher 7-year increase in BMI (R-2 = 0.048) and WC (R-2 = 0.045). The effects of depression on change in BMI and WC were mediated by emotional eating. Night sleep duration moderated the associations of emotional eating, while age moderated the associations of depression. More specifically, emotional eating predicted higher BMI (P = 0.007 for the interaction) and WC (P = 0.026, respectively) gain in shorter sleepers (7 h or less), but not in longer sleepers (9 h or more). Depression predicted higher BMI (P <0.001 for the interaction) and WC (P = 0.065, respectively) increase in younger participants, but not in older participants. Conclusions: Our findings offer support for the hypothesis that emotional eating is one behavioural mechanism between depression and development of obesity and abdominal obesity. Moreover, adults with a combination of shorter night sleep duration and higher emotional eating may be particularly vulnerable to weight gain. Future research should examine the clinical significance of our observations by tailoring weight management programs according to these characteristics.
  • Konttinen, Hanna; van Strien, Tatjana; Männistö, Satu; Jousilahti, Pekka; Haukkala, Ari (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Emotional eating (i.e. eating in response to negative emotions) has been suggested to be one mechanism linking depression and subsequent development of obesity. However, studies have rarely examined this mediation effect in a prospective setting and its dependence on other factors linked to stress and its management. We used a population-based prospective cohort of adults and aimed to examine 1) whether emotional eating mediated the associations between depression and 7-year change in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and 2) whether gender, age, night sleep duration or physical activity moderated these associations. Methods Participants were Finnish 25- to 74-year-olds who attended the DILGOM study at baseline in 2007 and follow-up in 2014. At baseline (n = 5024), height, weight and WC were measured in a health examination. At follow-up (n = 3735), height, weight and WC were based on measured or self-reported information. Depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression Scale), emotional eating (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18), physical activity and night sleep duration were self-reported. Age- and gender-adjusted structural equation models with full information maximum likelihood estimator were used in the analyses. Results Depression and emotional eating were positively associated and they both predicted higher 7-year increase in BMI (R2 = 0.048) and WC (R2 = 0.045). The effects of depression on change in BMI and WC were mediated by emotional eating. Night sleep duration moderated the associations of emotional eating, while age moderated the associations of depression. More specifically, emotional eating predicted higher BMI (P = 0.007 for the interaction) and WC (P = 0.026, respectively) gain in shorter sleepers (7 h or less), but not in longer sleepers (9 h or more). Depression predicted higher BMI (P < 0.001 for the interaction) and WC (P = 0.065, respectively) increase in younger participants, but not in older participants. Conclusions Our findings offer support for the hypothesis that emotional eating is one behavioural mechanism between depression and development of obesity and abdominal obesity. Moreover, adults with a combination of shorter night sleep duration and higher emotional eating may be particularly vulnerable to weight gain. Future research should examine the clinical significance of our observations by tailoring weight management programs according to these characteristics.
  • Viinikainen, Jutta; Bryson, Alex; Böckerman, Petri; Elovainio, Marko; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Juonala, Markus; Lehtimaki, Terho; Pahkala, Katja; Rovio, Suvi; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Raitakari, Olli; Pehkonen, Jaakko (2020)
    A burgeoning body of literature suggests that poor childhood health leads to adverse health outcomes. lower educational attainment and weaker labour market outcomes in adulthood. We focus on an important but under-researched topic, which is the role played by infection-related hospitalization (IRH) in childhood and its links to labour market outcomes later in life. The participants aged 24-30 years in 2001 N =1706 were drawn from the Young Finns Study, which includes comprehensive registry data on IRHs in childhood at ages 0-18 years. These data are linked to longitudinal registry information on labour market outcomes (2001-2012) and parental background (1980). The estimations were performed using ordinary least squares (OLS). The results showed that having an additional IRH is associated with lower log earnings (b = 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.193; -0.026). fewer years of being employed (b = -0.018. 95% CI: -0.031; -0.005). a higher probability of receiving any social income transfers (b = 0.012, 95 % CI: -0.002; 0.026) and larger social income transfers, conditional on receiving any (b = 0.085,95 % CI: 0.025; 0.145). IRHs are negatively linked to human capital accumulation. which explains a considerable part of the observed associations between IRHs and labour market outcomes. We did not find support for the hypothesis that adult health mediates the link. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Girchenko, Polina; Lahti-Pulkkinen, Marius; Heinonen, Kati; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Laivuori, Hannele; Lipsanen, Jari; Villa, Pia; Hämäläinen, Esa; Kajantie, Eero; Lahti, Jari; Räikkönen, Katri (2020)
    BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to environmental adversities, including maternal overweight/obesity, diabetes/ hypertensive disorders, or mood/anxiety disorders, increases the risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children. However, the underlying biological mechanisms remain elusive. We tested whether maternal antenatal inflammation was associated with the number of neurodevelopmental delay areas in children and whether it mediated the association between exposure to any prenatal environmental adversity and child neurodevelopmental delay. METHODS: Mother-child dyads (N = 418) from the PREDO (Prediction and Prevention of Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction) study were followed up to 10.8 years. We analyzed maternal plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycoprotein acetyls at 3 consecutive antenatal time points, measured maternal body mass index in early pregnancy, extracted data on diabetes/hypertensive disorders in pregnancy from medical records, and extracted data on mood/anxiety disorders until childbirth from the Care Register for Health Care. To estimate the number of neurodevelopmental delay areas in children across cognitive, motor, and social functioning, we pooled data from the Care Register for Health Care on psychological development disorders with mother-reported Ages and Stages Questionnaire data on developmental milestones. RESULTS: Higher levels of maternal high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycoprotein acetyls at and across all 3 antenatal time points were associated with 1.30- to 2.36-fold (p values, CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of maternal inflammation, especially when persisting throughout pregnancy, increase a child's risk of neurodevelopmental delay and mediate the effect of prenatal environmental adversity on child neurodevelopmental delay.
  • Kajamaa, Anu; Kumpulainen, Kristiina (2020)
    In this study, we aim to widen the understanding of how students' collaborative knowledge practices are mediated multimodally in a school's makerspace learning environment. Taking a sociocultural stance, we analyzed students' knowledge practices while carrying out STEAM learning challenges in small groups in the FUSE Studio, an elementary school's makerspace. Our findings show how discourse, digital and other "hands on" materials, embodied actions, such as gestures and postures, and the physical space with its arrangements mediated the students' knowledge practices. Our analysis of these mediational means led us to identifying four types of multimodal knowledge practice, namely orienting, interpreting, concretizing, and expanding knowledge, which guided and facilitated the students' creation of shared epistemic objects, artifacts, and their collective learning. However, due to the multimodal nature of knowledge practices, carrying out learning challenges in a makerspace can be challenging for students. To enhance the educational potential of makerspaces in supporting students' knowledge creation and learning, further attention needs to be directed to the development of new pedagogical solutions, to better facilitate multimodal knowledge practices and their collective management.
  • IDEFICS and I.Family consortia; Masip-Manuel, Guiomar; Foraita, Ronja; Silventoinen, Karri; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Bogl, Leonie-Helen; Kaprio, Jaakko (2021)
    Background: Many genes and molecular pathways are associated with obesity, but the mechanisms from genes to obesity are less well known. Eating behaviors represent a plausible pathway, but because the relationships of eating behaviors and obesity may be bi-directional, it remains challenging to resolve the underlying pathways. A longitudinal approach is needed to assess the contribution of genetic risk during the development of obesity in childhood. In this study we aim to examine the relationships between the polygenic risk score for body mass index (PRS-BMI), parental concern of overeating and obesity indices during childhood. Methods: The IDEFICS/I.Family study is a school-based multicenter pan-European cohort of children observed for 6 years (mean +/- SD follow-up 5.8 +/- 0.4). Children examined in 2007/2008 (wave 1) (mean +/- SD age: 4.4 +/- 1.1, range: 2-9 years), in 2009/2010 (wave 2) and in 2013/2014 (wave 3) were included. A total of 5112 children (49% girls) participated at waves 1, 2 and 3. For 2656 children with genome-wide data we constructed a PRS based on 2.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Z-score BMI and z-score waist circumference (WC) were assessed and eating behaviors and relevant confounders were reported by parents via questionnaires. Parental concern of overeating was derived from principal component analyses from an eating behavior questionnaire. Results: In cross-lagged models, the prospective associations between z-score obesity indices and parental concern of overeating were bi-directional. In mediation models, the association between the PRS-BMI and parental concern of overeating at wave 3 was mediated by baseline z-BMI (beta = 0.16, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.21) and baseline z-WC (beta = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.23). To a lesser extent, baseline parental concern of overeating also mediated the association between the PRS-BMI and z-BMI at wave 3 (beta = 0.10, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.13) and z-WC at wave 3 (beta = 0.09, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.12). Conclusions: The findings suggest that the prospective associations between obesity indices and parental concern of overeating are likely bi-directional, but obesity indices have a stronger association with future parental concern of overeating than vice versa. The findings suggest parental concern of overeating as a possible mediator in the genetic susceptibility to obesity and further highlight that other pathways are also involved. A better understanding of the genetic pathways that lead to childhood obesity can help to prevent weight gain.