Browsing by Subject "Metabolism"

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  • Esterhuizen, Karien; Lindeque, J. Zander; Mason, Shayne; van der Westhuizen, Francois H.; Suomalainen, Anu; Hakonen, Anna H.; Carroll, Christopher J.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; de Laat, Paul B.; Janssen, Mirian C. H.; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Louw, Roan (2019)
    We used a comprehensive metabolomics approach to study the altered urinary metabolome of two mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes (MELAS) cohorts carrying the m.3243A > G mutation. The first cohort were used in an exploratory phase, identifying 36 metabolites that were significantly perturbed by the disease. During the second phase, the 36 selected metabolites were able to separate a validation cohort of MELAS patients completely from their respective control group, suggesting usefulness of these 36 markers as a diagnostic set. Many of the 36 perturbed metabolites could be linked to an altered redox state, fatty acid catabolism and one-carbon metabolism. However, our evidence indicates that, of all the metabolic perturbations caused by MELAS, stalled fatty acid oxidation prevailed as being particularly disturbed. The strength of our study was the utilization of five different analytical platforms to generate the robust metabolomics data reported here. We show that urine may be a useful source for disease-specific metabolomics data, linking, amongst others, altered one-carbon metabolism to MELAS. The results reported here are important in our understanding of MELAS and might lead to better treatment options for the disease.
  • Lehikoinen, Anni I.; Kärkkäinen, Olli K.; Lehtonen, Marko A.S.; Auriola, Seppo O.K.; Hanhineva, Kati J.; Heinonen, Seppo T. (2018)
    Background: Although the effects of alcohol on metabolic processes in the body have been studied widely, there do not appear to be any previous reports clarifying how substance abuse changes metabolic profiles of pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the effect of substance abuse, especially alcohol use, on the metabolic profile of pregnant women during the first trimester. Study design: We applied mass spectrometry based non-targeted metabolite profiling of serum collected during routine visit to the hospital between gestational weeks 9 + 0 to 11 + 6 from controls (n = 55), alcohol users (n = 19), drug users (n = 24) and tobacco smokers (n = 40). Results: We observed statistically significantly differences among the study groups in serum levels of glutamate, glutamine, and serotonin (p-values Conclusion: The present study shows that alcohol and drug use were associated with increased glutamate, and decreased glutamine levels, and alcohol use is associated with decreased serotonin levels. This study serves as a proof-of-concept that the metabolite profile of human first trimester serum samples could be used to detect alcohol exposure during pregnancy. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Lensu, S.; Pekkala, S.P.; Mäkinen, A.; Karstunen, N.; Turpeinen, A.T.; Hulmi, J.J.; Silvennoinen, M.M.; Ma, H.; Kujala, U.M.; Karvinen, S.; Koch, L.G.; Britton, S.L.; Kainulainen, H. (2019)
    Background Physical activity and dietary intake of dairy products are associated with improved metabolic health. Dairy products are rich with branched chain amino acids that are essential for energy production. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the benefit of the sub-chronic effects of running and intake of milk protein supplements, we studied Low Capacity Runner rats (LCR), a rodent exercise model with risk for metabolic disorders. We especially focused on the role of Sirtuins, energy level dependent proteins that affect many cellular metabolic processes. Methods Forty-seven adult LCR female rats sedentary or running voluntarily in wheels were fed normal chow and given supplements of either whey or milk protein drink (PD)-supplemented water, or water only for 21 weeks. Physiological responses were measured in vivo. Blood lipids were determined from serum. Mitochondrial markers and Sirtuins (Sirt1-7) including downstream targets were measured in plantaris muscle by western blotting. Results For the first 10 weeks whey-drinking rats ran about 50% less compared to other groups; still, in all runners glucose tolerance improved and triglycerides decreased. Generally, running induced a ∼six-fold increase in running capacity and a ∼8% decrease in % body fat. Together with running, protein supplements increased the relative lean mass of the total body weight by ∼11%. In comparison with sedentary controls, running and whey increased HDL (21%) and whey, with or without running, lowered LDL (−34%). Running increased mitochondrial biogenesis and Sirtuins 3 and 4. When combined with exercise, both whey and milk protein drink induced about a 4-fold increase in Sirt3, compared to runners drinking water only, and about a 2-fold increase compared to the respective sedentary group. Protein supplements, with or without running, enhanced the phosphorylation level of the acetyl-coA-carboxylase, suggesting increased fat oxidation. Both supplemented diets increased Sirt5 and Sirt7 without an additional effect from exercise. Running diminished and PD supplement increased Sirt6. Conclusion We demonstrate in rats new sub-chronic effects of milk proteins on metabolism that involve Sirtuins and their downstream targets in skeletal muscle. The results show that running and milk proteins act on reducing the risk factors of metabolic disorders and suggest that the underlying mechanisms may involve Sirtuins. Notably, we found that milk protein supplements have some favorable effects on metabolism even without running.
  • Mokkala, Kati; Juhila, Juuso; Houttu, Noora; Sorsa, Timo; Laitinen, Kirsi (2020)
    Lower level of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP-1) has been observed in insulin resistance, while higher level of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) has been linked to obesity. The aim here was to study in overweight and obese women, typically manifesting with insulin resistance, whether IGFBP-1 and MMP-8 are related to and reflect systemic low-grade inflammation, metabolism and diet. Fasting serum from overweight and obese pregnant women (n = 100) in early pregnancy were analysed for IGFBP-1, phosphorylated IGFBP-1 (phIGFBP-1) and MMP-8. High-sensitivity CRP and GlycA were used as markers for low grade inflammation. GlycA and lipids were quantified using NMR. IGFBP-1 associated negatively with GlycA, evidenced by higher concentrations in the lowest quartile (median 1.53 (IQR 1.45-1.72)) compared to the highest (1.46 (1.39-1.55)) (P = 0.03). Several lipid metabolites, particularly HDL-cholesterol, correlated inversely with phIGFBP-1 (FDR
  • Kyrylenko, Petro (Helsingfors universitet, 2016)
    A natural sweetener from Stevia rebaudiana has the potential to reduce calorie intake. Recent data suggest that glycosides from Stevia display favorable pharmacological properties for the metabolic syndrome. Skeletal muscle constitutes a major extrahepatic tissue responsible for glucose utilization. We studied whether steviol can modulate glucose uptake in L6 myocytes. Signaling targets that are central in regulating cellular glucose metabolism were assessed with western blotting. Our data show that the highest concentration of steviol tested decreased slightly and statistically significantly the glucose uptake rate in insulin-stimulated muscle cells. This was supported by western blotting data from targets Akt and GSK-3β. Therefore, our data suggest that direct exposure of myocytes to steviol causes insulin resistance. The results can aid in planning further experiments to understand the pharmacological effects of Stevia-derived products. This would ultimately enhance our understanding of the mechanism behind insulin resistance and be used in future drug development.
  • Laitakari, Anna; Tapio, Joona; Mäkelä, Kari A.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Dengler, Franziska; Gylling, Helena; Walkinshaw, Gail; Myllyharju, Johanna; Dimova, Elitsa Y.; Serpi, Raisa; Koivunen, Peppi (2020)
    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) parallels the global obesity epidemic with unmet therapeutic needs. We investigated whether inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl 4-hydroxylase-2 (HIF-P4H-2), a key cellular oxygen sensor whose inhibition stabilizes HIF, would protect from NAFLD by subjecting HIF-P4H-2-deficient (Hif-p4h-2(gt/gt)) mice to a high-fat, high-fructose (HFHF) or high-fat, methionine-choline-deficient (HF-MCD) diet. On both diets, the Hif-p4h-2(gt/gt) mice gained less weight and had less white adipose tissue (WAT) and its inflammation, lower serum cholesterol levels, and lighter livers with less steatosis and lower serum ALT levels than the wild type (WT). The intake of fructose in majority of the Hif-p4h-2(gt/gt) tissues, including the liver, was 15-35% less than in the WT. We found upregulation of the key fructose transporter and metabolizing enzyme mRNAs, Slc2a2, Khka, and Khkc, and higher ketohexokinase activity in the Hif-p4h-2(gt/gt) small intestine relative to the WT, suggesting enhanced metabolism of fructose in the former. On the HF-MCD diet, the Hif-p4h-2(gt/gt) mice showed more browning of the WAT and increased thermogenesis. A pharmacological pan-HIF-P4H inhibitor protected WT mice on both diets against obesity, metabolic dysfunction, and liver damage. These data suggest that HIF-P4H-2 inhibition could be studied as a novel, comprehensive treatment strategy for NAFLD. Key messages center dot HIF-P4H-2 inhibition enhances intestinal fructose metabolism protecting the liver. center dot HIF-P4H-2 inhibition downregulates hepatic lipogenesis. center dot Induced browning of WAT and increased thermogenesis can also mediate protection. center dot HIF-P4H-2 inhibition offers a novel, comprehensive treatment strategy for NAFLD.
  • Reichhardt, M.P.; Meri, S. (2018)
    Abstract It has become increasingly apparent that the complement system, being an ancient defense mechanism, is not operative only in the extracellular milieu but also intracellularly. In addition to the known synthetic machinery in the liver and by macrophages, many other cell types, including lymphocytes, adipocytes and epithelial cells produce selected complement components. Activation of e.g. C3 and C5 inside cells may have multiple effects ranging from direct antimicrobial defense to cell differentiation and possible influence on metabolism. Intracellular activation of C3 and C5 in T cells is involved in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and promotes differentiation of T helper cells into Th1-type cells that activate cell-mediated immune responses. Adipocytes are unique in producing many complement sensor proteins (like C1q) and Factor D (adipsin), the key enzyme in promoting alternative pathway amplification. The effects of complement activation products are mediated by intracellular and cell membrane receptors, like C3aR, C5aR1, C5aR2 and the complement regulator MCP/CD46, often jointly with other receptors like the T cell receptor, Toll-like receptors and those of the inflammasomes. These recent observations link complement activation to cellular metabolic processes, intracellular defense reactions and to diverse adaptive immune responses. The complement components may thus be viewed as intracellular alarm molecules involved in the cellular danger response.
  • Huuskonen, Pasi; Keski-Nisula, Leea; Heinonen, Seppo; Voutilainen, Sari; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Pekkanen, Juha; Lampi, Jussi; Lehto, Soili M.; Haaparanta, Hannariikka; Elomaa, Antti-Pekka; Voutilainen, Raimo; Backman, Katri; Kokki, Hannu; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Paananen, Jussi; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Pasanen, Markku (2018)
    Background: A Finnish joint research effort Kuopio Birth Cohort (KuBiCo) seeks to evaluate the effects of genetics, epigenetics and different risk factors (medication, nutrition, lifestyle factors and environmental aspects) during pregnancy on the somatic and psychological health status of the mother and the child. Methods: KuBiCo will ultimately include information on 10,000 mother-child pairs who have given their informed consent to participate in this cohort. Identification of foetal health risk factors that can potentially later manifest as disease requires a repository of relevant biological samples and a flexible open up-to-date data handling system to register, store and analyse biological, clinical and questionnaire-based data. KuBiCo includes coded questionnaire-based maternal background data gathered before, during and after the pregnancy and bio-banking of maternal and foetal samples that will be stored in deep freezers. Data from the questionnaires and biological samples will be collected into one electronic database. KuBiCo consists of several work packages which are complementary to each other: Maternal, foetal and placental metabolism and omits; Paediatrics; Mental wellbeing; Prenatal period and delivery; Analgesics and anaesthetics during peripartum period; Environmental effects; Nutrition; and Research ethics. Discussion: This report describes the set-up of the KuBiCo and descriptive analysis from 3532 parturients on response frequencies and feedback to KuBiCo questionnaires gathered from June 2012 to April 2016. Additionally, we describe basic demographic data of the participants (n = 1172). Based on the comparison of demographic data between official national statistics and our descriptive analysis, KuBiCo represents a cross-section of Finnish pregnant women.
  • Huuskonen, Pasi; Keski-Nisula, Leea; Heinonen, Seppo; Voutilainen, Sari; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Pekkanen, Juha; Lampi, Jussi; Lehto, Soili M; Haaparanta, Hannariikka; Elomaa, Antti-Pekka; Voutilainen, Raimo; Backman, Katri; Kokki, Hannu; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Paananen, Jussi; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Pasanen, Markku (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background A Finnish joint research effort Kuopio Birth Cohort (KuBiCo) seeks to evaluate the effects of genetics, epigenetics and different risk factors (medication, nutrition, lifestyle factors and environmental aspects) during pregnancy on the somatic and psychological health status of the mother and the child. Methods KuBiCo will ultimately include information on 10,000 mother-child pairs who have given their informed consent to participate in this cohort. Identification of foetal health risk factors that can potentially later manifest as disease requires a repository of relevant biological samples and a flexible open up-to-date data handling system to register, store and analyse biological, clinical and questionnaire-based data. KuBiCo includes coded questionnaire-based maternal background data gathered before, during and after the pregnancy and bio-banking of maternal and foetal samples that will be stored in deep freezers. Data from the questionnaires and biological samples will be collected into one electronic database. KuBiCo consists of several work packages which are complementary to each other: Maternal, foetal and placental metabolism and omics; Paediatrics; Mental wellbeing; Prenatal period and delivery; Analgesics and anaesthetics during peripartum period; Environmental effects; Nutrition; and Research ethics. Discussion This report describes the set-up of the KuBiCo and descriptive analysis from 3532 parturients on response frequencies and feedback to KuBiCo questionnaires gathered from June 2012 to April 2016. Additionally, we describe basic demographic data of the participants (n = 1172). Based on the comparison of demographic data between official national statistics and our descriptive analysis, KuBiCo represents a cross-section of Finnish pregnant women.
  • Taskinen, Mervi; Antikainen, Marjatta; Pihkala, Jaana (2006)
  • Attard, Karl M.; Rodil, Ivan F.; Berg, Peter; Mogg, Andrew; Westerbom, Mats; Norkko, Alf; Glud, Ronnie N. (2020)
  • Long, Maeve; McWilliams, Thomas G. (2020)
    Autophagy refers to an essential mechanism that evolved to sustain eukaryotic homeostasis and metabolism during instances of nutrient deprivation. During autophagy, intracellular cargo is encapsulated and delivered to the lysosome for elimination. Loss of basal autophagy in vivo negatively impacts cellular proteostasis, metabolism and tissue integrity. Accordingly, many drug development strategies are focused on modulating autophagic capacity in various pathophysiological states, from cancer to neurodegenerative disease. The role of autophagy in cancer is particularly complicated, as either augmenting or attenuating this process can have variable outcomes on cellular survival, proliferation and transformation. This complexity is compounded by the emergence of several selective autophagy pathways, which act to eliminate damaged or superfluous cellular components in a targeted fashion. The advent of sensitive tools to monitor autophagy pathways in vivo holds promise to clarify their importance in cancer pathophysiology. In this review, we provide an overview of autophagy in cancer biology and outline how the development of tools to study autophagy in vivo could enhance our understanding of its function for translational benefit.
  • Ottka, Claudia; Weber, Corinna; Mueller, Elisabeth; Lohi, Hannes (2021)
    Introduction Phenobarbital is a commonly used anticonvulsant for the treatment of canine epileptic seizures. In addition to its central nervous system (CNS) depressing effects, long-term phenobarbital administration affects liver function. However, broader metabolic consequences of phenobarbital treatment are poorly characterized. Objectives To identify metabolic changes in the sera of phenobarbital-treated dogs and to investigate the relationship between serum phenobarbital concentration and metabolite levels. Methods Leftovers of clinical samples were used: 58 cases with phenobarbital concentrations ranging from 7.8 mu g/mL to 50.8 mu g/mL, and 25 controls. The study design was cross-sectional. The samples were analyzed by a canine-specific H-1 NMR metabolomics platform. Differences between the case and control groups were evaluated by logistic regression. The linear relationship between metabolite and phenobarbital concentrations was evaluated using linear regression. Results Increasing concentrations of glycoprotein acetyls, LDL particle size, palmitic acid, and saturated fatty acids, and decreasing concentrations of albumin, glutamine, histidine, LDL particle concentration, multiple HDL measures, and polyunsaturated fatty acids increased the odds of the sample belonging to the phenobarbital-treated group, having a p-value <.0033, and area under the curve (AUC) > .7. Albumin and glycoprotein acetyls had the best discriminative ability between the groups (AUC: .94). No linear associations between phenobarbital and metabolite concentrations were observed. Conclusion The identified metabolites are known to associate with, for example, liver and CNS function, inflammatory processes and drug binding. The lack of a linear association to phenobarbital concentration suggests that other factors than the blood phenobarbital concentration contribute to the magnitude of metabolic changes.
  • Laakso, Saila; Viljakainen, Heli; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Turpeinen, Ursula; Ivaska, Kaisa K.; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Ivell, Richard; Mäkitie, Outi (2018)
    Background: Previous studies suggest increased risk for hypoandrogenism and fractures in men with obesity. We aimed to describe the effects of severe childhood-onset obesity on the cross talk between metabolic state, testes, and skeleton at late puberty. Methods: A cohort of adolescent and young adult males with severe childhood-onset obesity (n = 21, mean age 18.5 years) and an age-matched control group were assessed for testicular hormones and X-ray absorptiometry-derived bone mass. Results: Current median body mass indexes for the obese and control subjects were 37.4 and 22.9. Severe early-onset obesity manifested with lower free testosterone (median [interquartile range] 244 [194-332] vs. 403 [293-463] pmol/L, p = 0.002). Lower insulin-like 3 (1.02 [0.82-1.23] vs. 1.22 [1.01-1.46] ng/mL, p = 0.045) and lower ratio of testosterone to luteinizing hormone (2.81 [1.96-3.98] vs. 4.10 [3.03-5.83] nmol/IU, p = 0.008) suggested disrupted Leydig cell function. The degree of current obesity inversely correlated with free testosterone (t = -0.516, p = 0.003), which in turn correlated positively with bone area at all measurement sites in males with childhood-onset obesity. Conclusions: Severe childhood-onset obesity is associated with impaired Leydig cell function in young men and lower free testosterone may contribute to impaired skeletal characteristics. (C) 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel