Browsing by Subject "Methylation"

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  • Smyth, L. J.; Kilner, J.; Nair, V.; Liu, H.; Brennan, E.; Kerr, K.; Sandholm, N.; Cole, J.; Dahlström, E.; Syreeni, A.; Salem, R. M.; Nelson, R. G.; Looker, H. C.; Wooster, C.; Anderson, K.; McKay, G. J.; Kee, F.; Young, I.; Andrews, D.; Forsblom, C.; Hirschhorn, J. N.; Godson, C.; Groop, P. H.; Maxwell, A. P.; Susztak, K.; Kretzler, M.; Florez, J. C.; McKnight, A. J. (2021)
    Background: A subset of individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are predisposed to developing diabetic kidney disease (DKD), the most common cause globally of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Emerging evidence suggests epigenetic changes in DNA methylation may have a causal role in both T1DM and DKD. The aim of this exploratory investigation was to assess differences in blood-derived DNA methylation patterns between individuals with T1DM-ESKD and individuals with long-duration T1DM but no evidence of kidney disease upon repeated testing to identify potential blood-based biomarkers. Blood-derived DNA from individuals (107 cases, 253 controls and 14 experimental controls) were bisulphite treated before DNA methylation patterns from both groups were generated and analysed using Illumina’s Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip arrays (n = 862,927 sites). Differentially methylated CpG sites (dmCpGs) were identified (false discovery rate adjusted p ≤ × 10–8 and fold change ± 2) by comparing methylation levels between ESKD cases and T1DM controls at single site resolution. Gene annotation and functionality was investigated to enrich and rank methylated regions associated with ESKD in T1DM. Results: Top-ranked genes within which several dmCpGs were located and supported by functional data with methylation look-ups in other cohorts include: AFF3, ARID5B, CUX1, ELMO1, FKBP5, HDAC4, ITGAL, LY9, PIM1, RUNX3, SEPTIN9 and UPF3A. Top-ranked enrichment pathways included pathways in cancer, TGF-β signalling and Th17 cell differentiation. Conclusions: Epigenetic alterations provide a dynamic link between an individual’s genetic background and their environmental exposures. This robust evaluation of DNA methylation in carefully phenotyped individuals has identified biomarkers associated with ESKD, revealing several genes and implicated key pathways associated with ESKD in individuals with T1DM.
  • Smyth, L. J; Kilner, J.; Nair, V.; Liu, H.; Brennan, E.; Kerr, K.; Sandholm, N.; Cole, J.; Dahlström, E.; Syreeni, A.; Salem, R. M; Nelson, R. G; Looker, H. C; Wooster, C.; Anderson, K.; McKay, G. J; Kee, F.; Young, I.; Andrews, D.; Forsblom, C.; Hirschhorn, J. N; Godson, C.; Groop, P. H; Maxwell, A. P; Susztak, K.; Kretzler, M.; Florez, J. C; McKnight, A. J (BioMed Central, 2021)
    Abstract Background A subset of individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are predisposed to developing diabetic kidney disease (DKD), the most common cause globally of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Emerging evidence suggests epigenetic changes in DNA methylation may have a causal role in both T1DM and DKD. The aim of this exploratory investigation was to assess differences in blood-derived DNA methylation patterns between individuals with T1DM-ESKD and individuals with long-duration T1DM but no evidence of kidney disease upon repeated testing to identify potential blood-based biomarkers. Blood-derived DNA from individuals (107 cases, 253 controls and 14 experimental controls) were bisulphite treated before DNA methylation patterns from both groups were generated and analysed using Illumina’s Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip arrays (n = 862,927 sites). Differentially methylated CpG sites (dmCpGs) were identified (false discovery rate adjusted p ≤ × 10–8 and fold change ± 2) by comparing methylation levels between ESKD cases and T1DM controls at single site resolution. Gene annotation and functionality was investigated to enrich and rank methylated regions associated with ESKD in T1DM. Results Top-ranked genes within which several dmCpGs were located and supported by functional data with methylation look-ups in other cohorts include: AFF3, ARID5B, CUX1, ELMO1, FKBP5, HDAC4, ITGAL, LY9, PIM1, RUNX3, SEPTIN9 and UPF3A. Top-ranked enrichment pathways included pathways in cancer, TGF-β signalling and Th17 cell differentiation. Conclusions Epigenetic alterations provide a dynamic link between an individual’s genetic background and their environmental exposures. This robust evaluation of DNA methylation in carefully phenotyped individuals has identified biomarkers associated with ESKD, revealing several genes and implicated key pathways associated with ESKD in individuals with T1DM.
  • Sillanpää, Elina; Laakkonen, Eija K.; Vaara, Elina; Rantanen, Taina; Kovanen, Vuokko; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Miina (2018)
    Background: Biomarkers of biological aging - DNA methylation age (DNAm age) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL)-correlate strongly with chronological age across the life course. It is, however, unclear how these measures of cellular wear and tear are associated with muscle strength and functional capacity, which are known to decline with older age and are associated with mortality. We investigated if DNAm age and LTL were associated with body composition and physical functioning by examining 48 monozygotic twin sisters. Methods: White blood cell DNAm age (predicted years) was calculated from Illumina 450 k BeadChip methylation data using an online calculator. DNAm age acceleration was defined from the residuals derived from a linear regression model of DNAm age on chronological age. LTL was measured by qPCR. Total body percentage of fat and lean mass were estimated using bioimpedance. Physical functioning was measured by grip strength, knee extension strength and by 10 m maximal walking speed test. Results: In all participants, DNAm age (58.4 +/- 6.6) was lower than chronological age (61.3 +/- 5.9 years). Pairwise correlations of monozygotic co-twins were high for DNAm age (0.88, 95% CI 0.79, 0.97), age acceleration (0.68, 95% CI 0.30, 0.85) and LTL (0.77, 95% CI 0.60, 0.94). Increased age acceleration i.e. faster epigenetic aging compared to chronological age was associated with lower grip strength (beta = -5.3 SE 1.9 p = 0.011), but not with other measures of physical functioning or body composition. LTL was not associated with body composition or physical functioning. Conclusions: To conclude, accelerated DNAm age is associated with lower grip strength, a biomarker known to be associated with physiological aging, and which predicts decline in physical functioning and mortality. Further studies may clarify whether epigenetic aging explains the decline in muscle strength with aging or whether DNAm age just illustrates the progress of aging.
  • Sillanpää, Elina; Laakkonen, Eija K.; Vaara, Elina; Rantanen, Taina; Kovanen, Vuokko; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Miina (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Biomarkers of biological aging – DNA methylation age (DNAm age) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL)– correlate strongly with chronological age across the life course. It is, however, unclear how these measures of cellular wear and tear are associated with muscle strength and functional capacity, which are known to decline with older age and are associated with mortality. We investigated if DNAm age and LTL were associated with body composition and physical functioning by examining 48 monozygotic twin sisters. Methods White blood cell DNAm age (predicted years) was calculated from Illumina 450 k BeadChip methylation data using an online calculator. DNAm age acceleration was defined from the residuals derived from a linear regression model of DNAm age on chronological age. LTL was measured by qPCR. Total body percentage of fat and lean mass were estimated using bioimpedance. Physical functioning was measured by grip strength, knee extension strength and by 10 m maximal walking speed test. Results In all participants, DNAm age (58.4 ± 6.6) was lower than chronological age (61.3 ± 5.9 years). Pairwise correlations of monozygotic co-twins were high for DNAm age (0.88, 95% CI 0.79, 0.97), age acceleration (0.68, 95% CI 0.30, 0.85) and LTL (0.77, 95% CI 0.60, 0.94). Increased age acceleration i.e. faster epigenetic aging compared to chronological age was associated with lower grip strength (β = − 5.3 SE 1.9 p = 0.011), but not with other measures of physical functioning or body composition. LTL was not associated with body composition or physical functioning. Conclusions To conclude, accelerated DNAm age is associated with lower grip strength, a biomarker known to be associated with physiological aging, and which predicts decline in physical functioning and mortality. Further studies may clarify whether epigenetic aging explains the decline in muscle strength with aging or whether DNAm age just illustrates the progress of aging.
  • Prasad, Rashmi B.; Lessmark, Anna; Almgren, Peter; Kovacs, Gyorgyi; Hansson, Ola; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Vitai, Marta; Ladenvall, Claes; Kovacs, Peter; Fadista, Joao; Lachmann, Michael; Zhou, Yuedan; Sonestedt, Emily; Poon, Wenny; Wollheim, Claes B.; Orho-Melander, Marju; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Paeaebo, Svante; Koranyi, Laszlo; Groop, Leif (2016)
    Aims/hypothesis Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 65 genetic loci associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. However, the contribution of distorted parental transmission of alleles to risk of type 2 diabetes has been mostly unexplored. Our goal was therefore to search for parent-of-origin effects (POE) among type 2 diabetes loci in families. Methods Families from the Botnia study (n = 4,211, 1,083 families) were genotyped for 72 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type 2 diabetes and assessed for POE on type 2 diabetes. The family-based Hungarian Transdanubian Biobank (HTB) (n = 1,463, > 135 families) was used to replicate SNPs showing POE. Association of type 2 diabetes loci within families was also tested. Results Three loci showed nominal POE, including the previously reported variants in KCNQ1, for type 2 diabetes in families from Botnia (rs2237895: p(POE) = 0.037), which can be considered positive controls. The strongest POE was seen for rs7578597 SNP in the THADA gene, showing excess transmission of the maternal risk allele T to diabetic offspring (Botnia: p(POE) = 0.01; HTB p(POE) = 0.045). These data are consistent with previous evidence of allelic imbalance for expression in islets, suggesting that the THADA gene can be imprinted in a POE-specific fashion. Five CpG sites, including those flanking rs7578597, showed differential methylation between diabetic and non-diabetic donor islets. Conclusions/interpretation Taken together, the data emphasise the need for genetic studies to consider from which parent an offspring has inherited a susceptibility allele.
  • Bazzocco, Sarah; Dopeso, Higinio; Martínez-Barriocanal, Águeda; Anguita, Estefanía; Nieto, Rocío; Li, Jing; García-Vidal, Elia; Maggio, Valentina; Rodrigues, Paulo; de Marcondes, Priscila G; Schwartz, Simo; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Sánchez, Alex; Mariadason, John M; Arango, Diego (BioMed Central, 2021)
    Abstract Background Cancer initiation and progression are driven by genetic and epigenetic changes. Although genome/exome sequencing has significantly contributed to the characterization of the genetic driver alterations, further investigation is required to systematically identify cancer driver genes regulated by promoter hypermethylation. Results Using genome-wide analysis of promoter methylation in 45 colorectal cancer cell lines, we found that higher overall methylation levels were associated with microsatellite instability (MSI), faster proliferation and absence of APC mutations. Because epigenetically silenced genes could represent important oncogenic drivers, we used mRNA expression profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumors to identify a subset of 382 (3.9%) genes for which promoter methylation was negatively associated with gene expression. Remarkably, a significant enrichment in zinc finger proteins was observed, including the transcriptional repressor ZBTB18. Re-introduction of ZBTB18 in colon cancer cells significantly reduced proliferation in vitro and in a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ZBTB18 is frequently lost or reduced in colorectal tumors, and reduced ZBTB18 expression was found to be associated with lymph node metastasis and shorter survival of patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer. Conclusions We identified a set of 382 genes putatively silenced by promoter methylation in colorectal cancer that could significantly contribute to the oncogenic process. Moreover, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that the epigenetically silenced gene ZBTB18 has tumor suppressor activity and is a novel prognostic marker for patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer.
  • Bazzocco, Sarah; Dopeso, Higinio; Martinez-Barriocanal, Agueda; Anguita, Estefania; Nieto, Rocio; Li, Jing; Garcia-Vidal, Elia; Maggio, Valentina; Rodrigues, Paulo; de Marcondes, Priscila Guimaraes; Schwartz, Simo; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Sanchez, Alex; Mariadason, John M.; Arango, Diego (2021)
    Background Cancer initiation and progression are driven by genetic and epigenetic changes. Although genome/exome sequencing has significantly contributed to the characterization of the genetic driver alterations, further investigation is required to systematically identify cancer driver genes regulated by promoter hypermethylation. Results Using genome-wide analysis of promoter methylation in 45 colorectal cancer cell lines, we found that higher overall methylation levels were associated with microsatellite instability (MSI), faster proliferation and absence of APC mutations. Because epigenetically silenced genes could represent important oncogenic drivers, we used mRNA expression profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumors to identify a subset of 382 (3.9%) genes for which promoter methylation was negatively associated with gene expression. Remarkably, a significant enrichment in zinc finger proteins was observed, including the transcriptional repressor ZBTB18. Re-introduction of ZBTB18 in colon cancer cells significantly reduced proliferation in vitro and in a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ZBTB18 is frequently lost or reduced in colorectal tumors, and reduced ZBTB18 expression was found to be associated with lymph node metastasis and shorter survival of patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer. Conclusions We identified a set of 382 genes putatively silenced by promoter methylation in colorectal cancer that could significantly contribute to the oncogenic process. Moreover, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that the epigenetically silenced gene ZBTB18 has tumor suppressor activity and is a novel prognostic marker for patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer.
  • Sillanpaa, Elina; Ollikainen, Miina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xiaoling; Leskinen, Tuija; Kujala, Urho M.; Tormakangas, Timo (2019)
    BackgroundEpigenetic clocks may increase our understanding on human aging and how genetic and environmental factors regulate an individual aging process. One of the most promising clocks is Horvath's DNA methylation (DNAm) age. Age acceleration, i.e., discrepancy between DNAm age and chronological age, tells us whether the person is biologically young or old compared to his/her chronological age. Several environmental and lifestyle factors have been shown to affect life span. We investigated genetic and environmental predictors of DNAm age in young and older monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with a focus on leisure time physical activity.ResultsQuantitative genetic modeling revealed that the relative contribution of non-shared environmental factors was larger among older compared with younger twin pairs [47% (95% CI 35, 63) vs. 26% (95% CI: 19, 35), p
  • Sillanpää, Elina; Ollikainen, Miina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xiaoling; Leskinen, Tuija; Kujala, Urho M.; Törmäkangas, Timo (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Epigenetic clocks may increase our understanding on human aging and how genetic and environmental factors regulate an individual aging process. One of the most promising clocks is Horvath’s DNA methylation (DNAm) age. Age acceleration, i.e., discrepancy between DNAm age and chronological age, tells us whether the person is biologically young or old compared to his/her chronological age. Several environmental and lifestyle factors have been shown to affect life span. We investigated genetic and environmental predictors of DNAm age in young and older monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with a focus on leisure time physical activity. Results Quantitative genetic modeling revealed that the relative contribution of non-shared environmental factors was larger among older compared with younger twin pairs [47% (95% CI 35, 63) vs. 26% (95% CI: 19, 35), p < 0.001]. Correspondingly, genetic variation accounted for less of the variance in older [53% (95% CI 37, 65)] compared with younger pairs [74% (95% CI 65, 82)]. We tested the hypothesis that leisure time physical activity is one of the non-shared environmental factors that affect epigenetic aging. A co-twin control analysis with older same-sex twin pairs (seven MZ and nine DZ pairs, mean age 60.4 years) who had persistent discordance in physical activity for 32 years according to reported/interviewed physical-activity data showed no differences among active and inactive co-twins, DNAm age being 60.7 vs. 61.8 years, respectively [between-group mean-difference: − 1.17 (95%CI − 3.43,1.10)]. Results from the younger cohort of twins supported findings that LTPA is not associated with DNAm age acceleration. Conclusions In older subjects, a larger amount of variance in DNAm age acceleration was explained by non-shared environmental factors compared to young individuals. However, leisure time physical activity during adult years has at most a minor effect on DNAm age acceleration. This is consistent with recent findings that long-term leisure time physical activity in adulthood has little effect on mortality after controlling for genetic factors.