Browsing by Subject "Motor cortex"

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  • Aikio, R.; Laaksonen, K.; Sairanen, A; Parkkonen, E.; Abou Elseoud, A.; Kujala, J.; Forss, N. (2021)
    In healthy subjects, motor cortex activity and electromyographic (EMG) signals from contracting contralateral muscle show coherence in the beta (15-30 Hz) range. Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) is considered a sign of functional coupling between muscle and brain. Based on prior studies, CMC is altered in stroke, but functional significance of this finding has remained unclear. Here, we examined CMC in acute stroke patients and correlated the results with clinical outcome measures and corticospinal tract (CST) integrity estimated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). During isometric contraction of the extensor carpi radialis muscle, EMG and magneto encephalographic oscillatory signals were recorded from 29 patients with paresis of the upper extremity due to ischemic stroke and 22 control subjects. CMC amplitudes and peak frequencies at 13-30 Hz were compared between the two groups. In the patients, the peak frequency in both the affected and the unaffected hemisphere was significantly (p < 0.01) lower and the strength of CMC was significantly (p < 0.05) weaker in the affected hemisphere compared to the control subjects. The strength of CMC in the patients correlated with the level of tactile sensitivity and clinical test results of hand function. In contrast, no correlation between measures of CST integrity and CMC was found. The results confirm the earlier findings that CMC is altered in acute stroke and demonstrate that CMC is bidirectional and not solely a measure of integrity of the efferent corticospinal tract.
  • Varshney, Mukesh Kumar; Yu, Nancy Yiu-Lin; Katayama, Shintaro; Li, Xin; Liu, Tianyao; Wu, Wan-Fu; Tohonen, Virpi; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Kere, Juha; Fan, Xiaotang; Inzunza, Jose; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Nalvarte, Ivan (2020)
    Background: Male estrogen receptor beta (ER beta) knockout (BERKO) mice display anxiety and aggression linked to, among others, altered serotonergic signaling in the basolateral amygdala and dorsal raphe, impaired cortical radial glia migration, and reduced GABAergic signaling. The effects on primary motor cortex (M1 cortex) and locomotor activity as a consequence of ER beta loss have not been investigated. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether locomotor activity is altered as a consequence of the changes in the M1 cortex. Methods: The locomotor activity of male wild-type (WT) and BERKO mice was evaluated using the open-field and rotarod tests. Molecular changes in the M1 cortex were analyzed by RNA sequencing, electron microscopy, electrophysiology, and immunohistological techniques. In addition, we established oligodendrocyte (OL) cultures from WT and BERKO mouse embryonic stem cells to evaluate OL function. Results: Locomotor profiling revealed that BERKO mice were more active than WT mice but had impaired motor coordination. Analysis of the M1 cortex pointed out differences in synapse function and myelination. There was a reduction in GABAergic signaling resulting in imbalanced excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission as well as a defective OL differentiation accompanied by myelin defects. The effects of ER beta loss on OL differentiation were confirmed in vitro. Conclusion: ER beta is an important regulator of GABAergic interneurons and OL differentiation, which impacts on adult M1 cortex function and may be linked to increased locomotor activity and decreased motor coordination in BERKO mice.
  • Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Koponen, Lari M.; Mäkelä, Niko; Souza, Victor Hugo; Stenroos, Matti; Ilmoniemi, Risto J. (2019)
    Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) has been studied with paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) by administering two pulses at a millisecond-scale interstimulus interval (ISI) to a single cortical target. It has, however, been difficult to study the interaction of nearby cortical targets with paired-pulse TMS. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a multi-locus TMS (mTMS) device, which allows controlling the stimulus location electronically. Here, we applied mTMS to study SICI in primary motor cortex with paired pulses targeted to adjacent locations, aiming to quantify the extent of the cortical region producing SICI in the location of a test stimulus. We varied the location and timing of the conditioning stimulus with respect to a test stimulus targeted to the cortical hotspot of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) in order to study their effects on motor evoked potentials. We further applied a two-coil protocol with the conditioning stimulus given by an oval coil only to the surroundings of the APB hotspot, to which a subsequent test stimulus was administered with a figure-of-eight coil. The strongest SICI occurred at ISIs below 1 ms and at ISIs around 2.5 ms. These ISIs increased when the conditioning stimulus receded from the APB hotspot. Our two-coil paired-pulse TMS study suggests that SICI at ISIs of 0.5 and 2.5 ms originate from different mechanisms or neuronal elements.
  • Salo, Karita S.-T.; Vaalto, Selja M. I.; Koponen, Lari M.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J. (2019)
    Chronic neuropathic pain is known to alter the primary motor cortex (M1) function. Less is known about the normal, physiological effects of experimental neurogenic pain on M1. The objective of this study is to determine how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) is altered in the M1 representation area of a muscle exposed to experimental pain compared to SICI of another muscle not exposed to pain. The cortical representation areas of the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and biceps brachii (BB) muscles of 11 subjects were stimulated with a multi-locus transcranial magnetic stimulation device while the resulting motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded with electromyography. Single- and paired-pulse TMS was administered in seven conditions, including one with the right hand placed in cold water. The stimulation intensity for the conditioning pulses in the paired-pulse examination was 80% of the resting motor threshold (RMT) of the stimulated site and 120% of RMT for both the test and single pulses. The paired-pulse MEP amplitudes were normalized with the mean amplitude of the single-pulse MEPs of the same condition and muscle. SICI was compared between conditions. After the cold pain, the normalized paired-pulse MEP amplitudes decreased in APB, but not in BB, indicating that SICI was potentially increased only in the cortical area of the muscle subjected to pain. These data suggest that SICI is increased in the M1 representation area of a hand muscle shortly after exposure to pain has ended, which implies that short-lasting pain can alter the inhibitory balance in M1.