Browsing by Subject "Mycology"

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  • Mali, Tuulia; Mäki, Mari; Hellén, Heidi; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Bäck, Jaana; Lundell, Taina (2019)
    Effect of three wood-decaying fungi on decomposition of spruce wood was studied in solid-state cultivation conditions for a period of three months. Two white rot species (Trichaptum abietinum and Phlebia radiata) were challenged by a brown rot species (Fomitopsis pinicola) in varying combinations. Wood decomposition patterns as determined by mass loss, carbon to nitrogen ratio, accumulation of dissolved sugars, and release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were observed to depend on both fungal combinations and growth time. Similar dependence of fungal species combination, either white or brown rot dominated, was observed for secreted enzyme activities on spruce wood. Fenton chemistry suggesting reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ was detected in the presence of F. pinicola, even in co-cultures, together with substantial degradation of wood carbohydrates and accumulation of oxalic acid. Significant correlation was perceived with two enzyme activity patterns (oxidoreductases produced by white rot fungi; hydrolytic enzymes produced by the brown rot fungus) and wood degradation efficiency. Moreover, emission of four signature VOCs clearly grouped the fungal combinations. Our results indicate that fungal decay type, either brown or white rot, determines the loss of wood mass and decomposition of polysaccharides as well as the pattern of VOCs released upon fungal growth on spruce wood.
  • Lundell, Taina Kristina; Bentley, Elodie; Hilden, Sari Kristiina; Rytioja, Johanna Tuulikki; Kuuskeri, Jaana Tuulia; Ufot, Usenobong F.; Nousiainen, Paula Annukka; Hofrichter, Martin; Wahlsten, Matti Per-Vilhelm; Doyle, Wendy; Smith, Andrew T. (2017)
    Background. Manganese peroxidases (MnP) and lignin peroxidases (LiP) are haem-including fungal secreted class-II peroxidases, which are interesting oxidoreductases in protein engineering aimed at design of biocatalysts for lignin and lignocellulose conversion, dye compound degradation, activation of aromatic compounds, and biofuel production. Objective. Recombinant short-type MnP (Pr-MnP3) of the white rot fungus Phlebia radiata, and its manganese-binding site (E40, E44, D186) directed variants were produced and characterized. To allow catalytic applications, enzymatic bleaching of Reactive Blue 5 and conversion of lignin-like compounds by engineered class-II peroxidases were explored. Method. Pr-MnP3 and its variants were expressed in Escherichia coli. The resultant body proteins were lysed, purified and refolded into haem-including enzymes in 6-7% protein recovery, and examined spectroscopically and kinetically. Results. Successful production of active enzymes was attained, with spectral characteristics of high-spin class-II peroxidases. Recombinant Pr-MnP3 demonstrated high affinity to Mn2+, which was noticeably affected by single (D186H/N) and double (E40H+E44H) mutations. Without addition of Mn2+, Pr-MnP3 was able to oxidize ABTS and decolorize Reactive Blue 5. Pc-LiPH8, its Trp-radical site variants, and engineered CiP-LiP demonstrated conversion of veratryl alcohol and dimeric non-phenolic lignin-model compounds (arylglycerol-β-aryl ethers) with production of veratraldehyde, which is evidence for cation radical formation with subsequent Cα-Cβ cleavage. Pc-LiPH8 and CiP variants were able to effectively oxidize and convert the phenolic dimer (guaiacylglycerol-β–guaiacyl ether). Conclusion. Our results demonstrate suitability of engineered MnP and LiP peroxidases for dye-decolorizing, and efficiency of LiP and its variants for activation and degradation of phenolic and non-phenolic lignin-like aryl ether-linked compounds.
  • Lundell, Taina K.; Mäkelä, Miia R.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Hilden, Kristiina S. (Academic Press, 2014)
    Advances in Botanical Research
    Saprobic (saprotrophic and saprophytic) wood-decay fungi are in majority species belonging to the fungal phylum Basidiomycota, whereas saprobic plant litter-decomposing fungi are species of both the Basidiomycota and the second Dikarya phylum Ascomycota. Wood-colonizing white rot and brown rot fungi are principally polypore, gilled pleurotoid, or corticioid Basidiomycota species of the class Agaricomycetes, which also includes forest and grassland soil-inhabiting and litter-decomposing mushroom species. In this chapter, examples of lignocellulose degradation patterns are presented in the current view of genome sequencing and comparative genomics of fungal wood-decay enzymes. Specific attention is given to the model white rot fungus, lignin-degrading species Phanerochaete chrysosporium and its wood decay-related gene expression (transcriptomics) on lignocellulose substrates. Types of fungal decay patterns on wood and plant lignocellulose are discussed in the view of fungal lifestyle strategies. Potentiality of the plant biomass-decomposing Basidiomycota species, their secreted enzymes and respective lignocellulose-attacking genes is evaluated in regard to development of biotechnological and industrial applications.
  • Mali, Tuulia; Kuuskeri, Jaana; Shah, Firoz; Lundell, Taina Kristina (2017)
    Fomitopsis pinicola is a species of Polyporales frequently encountered in Nordic temperate and boreal forests. In nature, the fungus causes destructive brown rot in wood, colonizing tree trunks often occupied by other Basidiomycota species. We mimicked these species-species interactions by introducing F. pinicola to five white rot species, all common saprotrophs of Norway spruce. Hyphal interactions and mycelial growth in various combinations were recorded, while activities of lignocellulose-acting CAZymes and oxidoreductases were followed in co-cultures on two different carbon-source media. Of the species, Phlebia radiata and Trichaptum abietinum were the strongest producers of lignin-modifying oxidoreductases (laccase, manganese peroxidase) when evaluated alone, as well as in co-cultures, on the two different growth media (low-nitrogen liquid medium containing ground coniferous wood, and malt extract broth). F. pinicola was an outstanding producer of oxalic acid (up to 61 mM), whereas presence of P. radiata prevented acidification of the growth environment in the liquid malt-extract cultures. When enzyme profiles of the species combinations were clustered, time-dependent changes were observed on wood-supplemented medium during the eight weeks of growth. End-point acidity and production of mycelium, oxalic acid and oxidoreductase activities, in turn clustered the fungal combinations into three distinct functional groups, determined by the presence of F. pinicola and P. radiata, by principal component analysis. Our findings indicate that combinations of wood-decay fungi have dramatic dynamic effects on the production of lignocellulose-active enzymes, which may lead to divergent degradative processes of dead wood and forest litter.
  • Mattila, Hans Kristian; Kačar, Dina; Mali, Tuulia Leena Elina; Lundell, Taina Kristina (2018)
    The Polyporales phlebioid white rot fungus Phlebia radiata is efficient in decomposing the wood main components, and in producing ethanol from lignocelluloses and waste materials. Based to these qualifications, the fungus was adopted for design of a consolidated bioprocess method to convert wood waste materials into ethanol without pretreatments. Higher ethanol yield was aimed by introducing collaborative fungal cultivations including isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, other yeasts, and a brown rot fungus. Various waste lignocellulose materials such as wheat and barley straw, recycled wood-fiber based core board, recycled construction waste wood, spruce saw dust, and birch wood were applied to represent wood and non-wood waste lignocellulose of different origin, chemical content and structure. In solid-state single cultivations with the white rot fungus P. radiata, both core board and barley straw turned out as suitable substrates for the consolidated bioprocess. Up to 32.4 ± 4.5 g/L of ethanol accumulated in the solid-state core board cultivation in 30 days whereas with barley straw, 7.0 ± 0.01 g/L of ethanol was obtained. Similar concentrations of ethanol were produced in increased-volume and higher gravity bioreactor cultivations without chemical, physical or enzymatic pretreatment. In all, our consolidated method adopting a white rot fungus is a promising and economic alternative for second generation bioethanol production from waste and residual lignocelluloses.
  • Salavirta, Heikki; Oksanen, Ilona; Kuuskeri, Jaana; Makela, Miia; Laine, Pia; Paulin, Lars; Lundell, Taina (2014)
    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles supporting individual life-style via generation of proton motive force and cellular energy, and indispensable metabolic pathways. As part of genome sequencing of the white rot Basidiomycota species Phlebia radiata, we first assembled its mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). So far, the 156 348 bp mtDNA is the second largest described for fungi, and of considerable size among eukaryotes. The P. radiata mtDNA assembled as single circular dsDNA molecule containing genes for the large and small ribosomal RNAs, 28 transfer RNAs, and over 100 open reading frames encoding the 14 fungal conserved protein subunits of the mitochondrial complexes I, III, IV, and V. Two genes (atp6 and tRNA-IleGAU) were duplicated within 6.1 kbp inverted region, which is a unique feature of the genome. The large mtDNA size, however, is explained by the dominance of intronic and intergenic regions (sum 80% of mtDNA sequence). The intergenic DNA stretches harness short (≤200 nt) repetitive, dispersed and overlapping sequence elements in abundance. Long self-splicing introns of types I and II interrupt eleven of the conserved genes (cox1,2,3; cob; nad1,2,4,4L,5; rnl; rns). The introns embrace a total of 57 homing endonucleases with LAGLIDADGD and GYI-YIG core motifs, which makes P. radiata mtDNA to one of the largest known reservoirs of intron-homing endonucleases. The inverted duplication, intergenic stretches, and intronic features are indications of dynamics and genetic flexibility of the mtDNA, not fully recognized to this extent in fungal mitochondrial genomes previously, thus giving new insights for the evolution of organelle genomes in eukaryotes.
  • Lundell, Taina; Mäkelä, Miia (Gaudeamus, 2018)
  • Kuuskeri, Jaana; Häkkinen, Mari; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Tamene, Fitsum; Miettinen, Sini; Nousiainen, Paula; Kemell, Marianna; Auvinen, Petri; Lundell, Taina (2016)
    Background The white-rot Agaricomycetes species Phlebia radiata is an efficient wood-decaying fungus degrading all wood components, including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. We cultivated P. radiata in solid state cultures on spruce wood, and extended the experiment to 6 weeks to gain more knowledge on the time-scale dynamics of protein expression upon growth and wood decay. Total proteome and transcriptome of P. radiata were analyzed by peptide LC–MS/MS and RNA sequencing at specific time points to study the enzymatic machinery on the fungus’ natural growth substrate. Results According to proteomics analyses, several CAZy oxidoreductase class-II peroxidases with glyoxal and alcohol oxidases were the most abundant proteins produced on wood together with enzymes important for cellulose utilization, such as GH7 and GH6 cellobiohydrolases. Transcriptome additionally displayed expression of multiple AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases indicative of oxidative cleavage of wood carbohydrate polymers. Large differences were observed for individual protein quantities at specific time points, with a tendency of enhanced production of specific peroxidases on the first 2 weeks of growth on wood. Among the 10 class-II peroxidases, new MnP1-long, characterized MnP2-long and LiP3 were produced in high protein abundances, while LiP2 and LiP1 were upregulated at highest level as transcripts on wood together with the oxidases and one acetyl xylan esterase, implying their necessity as primary enzymes to function against coniferous wood lignin to gain carbohydrate accessibility and fungal growth. Majority of the CAZy encoding transcripts upregulated on spruce wood represented activities against plant cell wall and were identified in the proteome, comprising main activities of white-rot decay. Conclusions Our data indicate significant changes in carbohydrate-active enzyme expression during the six-week surveillance of P. radiata growing on wood. Response to wood substrate is seen already during the first weeks. The immediate oxidative enzyme action on lignin and wood cell walls is supported by detected lignin substructure sidechain cleavages, release of phenolic units, and visual changes in xylem cell wall ultrastructure. This study contributes to increasing knowledge on fungal genetics and lignocellulose bioconversion pathways, allowing us to head for systems biology, development of biofuel production, and industrial applications on plant biomass utilizing wood-decay fungi.
  • Mäkinen, Mari Annukka; Risulainen, Netta; Mattila, Hans Kristian; Lundell, Taina Kristina (2018)
    Previously identified twelve plant cell wall degradation-associated genes of the white rot fungus Phlebia radiata were studied by RT-qPCR in semi-aerobic solid-state cultures on lignocellulose waste material, and on glucose-containing reference medium. Wood-decay-involved enzyme activities and ethanol production were followed to elucidate both the degradative and fermentative processes. On the waste lignocellulose substrate, P. radiata carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZy) genes encoding cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic activities were significantly upregulated whereas genes involved in lignin modification displayed a more complex response. Two lignin peroxidase genes were differentially expressed on waste lignocellulose compared to glucose medium, whereas three manganese peroxidase-encoding genes were less affected. On the contrary, highly significant difference was noticed for three cellulolytic genes (cbhI_1, eg1, bgl1) with higher expression levels on the lignocellulose substrate than on glucose. This indicates expression of the wood-attacking degradative enzyme system by the fungus also on the recycled, waste core board material. During the second week of cultivation, ethanol production increased on the core board to 0.24 g/L, and extracellular activities against cellulose, xylan, and lignin were detected. Sugar release from the solid lignocellulose resulted with concomitant accumulation of ethanol as fermentation product. Our findings confirm that the fungus activates its white rot decay system also on industrially processed lignocellulose adopted as growth substrate, and under semi-aerobic cultivation conditions. Thus, P. radiata is a good candidate for lignocellulose-based renewable biotechnology to make biofuels and biocompounds from materials with less value for recycling or manufacturing.