Browsing by Subject "NECROSIS-FACTOR-ALPHA"

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  • Nordgreen, Janicke; Edwards, Sandra A.; Boyle, Laura Ann; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Veit, Christina; Sayyari, Amin; Marin, Daniela E.; Dimitrov, Ivan; Janczak, Andrew M.; Valros, Anna (2020)
    Sickness can change our mood for the worse, leaving us sad, lethargic, grumpy and less socially inclined. This mood change is part of a set of behavioral symptoms called sickness behavior and has features in common with core symptoms of depression. Therefore, the physiological changes induced by immune activation, for example following infection, are in the spotlight for explaining mechanisms behind mental health challenges such as depression. While humans may take a day off and isolate themselves until they feel better, farm animals housed in groups have only limited possibilities for social withdrawal. We suggest that immune activation could be a major factor influencing social interactions in pigs, with outbreaks of damaging behavior such as tail biting as a possible result. The hypothesis presented here is that the effects of several known risk factors for tail biting are mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, proteins produced by the immune system, and their effect on neurotransmitter systems. We describe the background for and implications of this hypothesis.
  • Huusko, Johanna M.; Karjalainen, Minna K.; Mahlman, Mari; Haataja, Ritva; Kari, M. Anneli; Andersson, Sture; Toldi, Gergely; Tammela, Outi; Ramet, Mika; Lavoie, Pascal M.; Hallman, Mikko (2014)
  • Havunen, Riikka; Santos, Joao M.; Sorsa, Suvi; Rantapero, Tommi; Lumen, Dave; Siurala, Mikko; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Tähtinen, Siri; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    Cancer treatment with local administration of armed oncolytic viruses could potentially induce systemic antitumor effects, or the abscopal effect, as they self-amplify in tumors, induce danger signaling, and promote tumor-associated antigen presentation. In this study, oncolytic adenovirus coding for human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 (also known as [a.k.a.] TILT-123) provoked antitumor efficacy in tumors that were injected with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 and those that were left non-injected in the same animal. Importantly, the virus was able to travel to distant tumors. To dissect the effects of oncolysis and cytokines, we studied replication-incompetent viruses in mice. Systemic antitumor effects were similar in both models, highlighting the importance of the arming device. The cytokines induced positive changes in immune cell infiltrates and induced the expression of several immune-reaction-related genes in tumors. In addition, Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 was able to increase homing of adoptively transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes into both injected and non-injected tumors, possibly mediated through chemokine expression. In summary, local treatment with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 resulted in systemic antitumor efficacy by inducing immune cell infiltration and trafficking into both treated and untreated tumors. Moreover, the oncolytic adenovirus platform had superior systemic effects over replication-deficient vector through spreading into distant tumors.
  • Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Quixabeira, Dafne C. A.; Santos, Joao M.; Havunen, Riikka; Milenova, Ioanna; Verhoeff, Jan; Heinio, Camilla; Zafar, Sadia; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Kalervo, Aino; Sorsa, Suvi; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2021)
    Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as anti-PD-1 have revolutionized the field of oncology over the past decade. Nevertheless, the majority of patients do not benefit from them. Virotherapy is a flexible tool that can be used to stimulate and/or recruit different immune populations. T-cell enabling virotherapy could enhance the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors, even in tumors resistant to these inhibitors. The T-cell potentiating virotherapy used here consisted of adenoviruses engineered to express tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-2 in the tumor microenvironment. To study virus efficacy in checkpoint-inhibitor resistant tumors, we developed an anti-PD-1 resistant melanoma model in vivo. In resistant tumors, adding virotherapy to an anti-PD-1 regimen resulted in increased survival (p=0.0009), when compared to anti-PD-1 monotherapy. Some of the animals receiving virotherapy displayed complete responses, which did not occur in the immune checkpoint-inhibitor monotherapy group. When adenoviruses were delivered into resistant tumors, there were signs of increased CD8 T-cell infiltration and activation, which - together with a reduced presence of M2 macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells - could explain those results. T-cell enabling virotherapy appeared as a valuable tool to counter resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors. The clinical translation of this approach could increase the number of cancer patients benefiting from immunotherapies.
  • Vilander, Laura M.; Vaara, Suvi T.; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Pettilä, Ville; FINNAKI Study Grp; Laru-Sompa, Raili; Pulkkinen, Anni; Saarelainen, Minna; Reilama, Mikko; Tolmunen, Sinikka; Rantalainen, Ulla; Miettinen, Marja; Suvela, Markku; Pesola, Katrine; Saastamoinen, Pekka; Kauppinen, Sirpa; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Korhonen, Anna-Maija; Nisula, Sara; Vaara, Suvi; Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili; Mildh, Leena; Haapio, Mikko; Nurminen, Laura; Sutinen, Sari; Pettilä, Leena; Laitinen, Helinä; Syrja, Heidi; Henttonen, Kirsi; Lappi, Elina; Boman, Hillevi; Varpula, Tero; Porkka, Päivi; Sivula, Mirka; Rahkonen, Mira; Tsurkka, Anne; Prittinen, Niina; Alaspaa, Ari; Salanto, Ville; Juntunen, Hanna; Sanisalo, Teija; Parviainen, Ilkka; Uusaro, Ari; Ruokonen, Esko; Bendel, Stepani; Rissanen, Niina; Lång, Maarit; Rahikainen, Sari; Rissanen, Saija; Ahonen, Merja; Halonen, Elina; Vaskelainen, Eija; Poukkanen, Meri; Lintula, Esa; Suominen, Sirpa; Heikkinen, Jorma; Lavander, Timo; Heinonen, Kirsi; Juopperi, Anne-Mari; Kaminski, Tadeusz; Gäddnäs, Fiia; Kuusela, Tuija; Roiko, Jane; Karlsson, Sari; Reinikainen, Matti; Surakka, Tero; Jyrkönen, Helena; Eiserbeck, Tanja; Kallinen, Jaana; Lund, Vesa; Tuominen, Päivi; Perkola, Pauliina; Tuominen, Riikka; Hietaranta, Marika; Johansson, Satu; Hovilehto, Seppo; Kirsi, Anne; Tiainen, Pekka; Myllärinen, Tuija; Leino, Pirjo; Toropainen, Anne; Kuitunen, Anne; Leppänen, Ilona; Levoranta, Markus; Hoppu, Sanna; Sauranen, Jukka; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Kukkurainen, Atte; Kortelainen, Samuli; Varila, Simo; Inkinen, Outi; Koivuviita, Niina; Kotamäki, Jutta; Laine, Anu; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Laurila, Jouko J.; Sälkiö, Sinikka; Koivisto, Simo-Pekka; Hautamäki, Raku; Skinnar, Maria (2019)
    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a syndrome with high incidence among the critically ill. Because the clinical variables and currently used biomarkers have failed to predict the individual susceptibility to AKI, candidate gene variants for the trait have been studied. Studies about genetic predisposition to AKI have been mainly underpowered and of moderate quality. We report the association study of 27 genetic variants in a cohort of Finnish critically ill patients, focusing on the replication of associations detected with variants in genes related to inflammation, cell survival, or circulation. In this prospective, observational Finnish Acute Kidney Injury (FINNAKI) study, 2647 patients without chronic kidney disease were genotyped. We defined AKI according to Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. We compared severe AKI (Stages 2 and 3, n = 625) to controls (Stage 0, n = 1582). For genotyping we used iPLEX(TM) Assay (Agena Bioscience). We performed the association analyses with PLINK software, using an additive genetic model in logistic regression. Despite the numerous, although contradictory, studies about association between polymorphisms rs1800629 in TNFA and rs1800896 in IL10 and AKI, we found no association (odds ratios 1.06 (95% CI 0.89-1.28, p = 0.51) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.80-1.05, p = 0.20), respectively). Adjusting for confounders did not change the results. To conclude, we could not confirm the associations reported in previous studies in a cohort of critically ill patients.
  • Ylösmäki, Erkko; Cerullo, Vincenzo (2020)
    The approval of the first oncolytic virus (OV) for the treatment of metastatic melanoma and the recent discovery that the use of oncolytic viruses may enhance cancer immunotherapies targeted against various immune checkpoint proteins have attracted great interest in the field of cancer virotherapy. OVs are designed to target and kill cancer cells leaving normal cell unharmed. OV infection and concomitant cancer cell killing stimulate anti-tumour immunity and modulates tumour microenvironment towards less immunosuppressive phenotype. The intrinsic capacity of OVs to turn immunologically cold tumours into immunologically hot tumours, and to increase immune cell and cytokine infiltration, can be further enhanced by arming OVs with transgenes that increase their immunostimulatory activities and direct immune responses specifically towards cancer cells. These OVs, specifically engineered to be used as cancer immunotherapeutics, can be synergized with other immune modulators or cytotoxic agents to achieve the most potent immunotherapy for cancer.
  • Olkkonen, Juri; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Hynninen, Joel; Konttinen, Yrjo T.; Mandelin, Jami (2015)
    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have altered circadian rhythm of circulating serum cortisol, melatonin and IL-6, as well as disturbance in the expression of clock genes ARNTL2 and NPAS2. In humans, TNF alpha increases the expression ARNTL2 and NPAS2 but paradoxically suppresses clock output genes DPB and PER3. Our objective was to investigate the expression of direct clock suppressors DEC1 and DEC2 (BHLHE 40 and 41 proteins) in response to TNF alpha and investigate their role during inflammation. Methods Cultured primary fibroblasts were stimulated with TNF alpha. Effects on DEC2 were studied using RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence staining. The role of NF-kappa B in DEC2 increase was analyzed using IKK-2 specific inhibitor IMD-0354. Cloned DEC2 was transfected into HEK293 cells to study its effects on gene expression. Transfections into primary human fibroblasts were used to confirm the results. The presence of DEC2 was analyzed in (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) synovial membranes by immunohistochemistry. Results TNF alpha increased DEC2 mRNA and DEC2 was mainly detected at nuclei after the stimulus. The effects of TNF alpha on DEC2 expression were mediated via NF-kappa B. Overexpression, siRNA and promoter activity studies disclosed that DEC2 directly regulates IL-1 beta, in both HEK293 cells and primary human fibroblasts. DEC2 was increased in synovial membrane in RA compared to OA. Conclusion Not only ARNTL2 and NPAS2 but also DEC2 is regulated by TNF alpha in human fibroblasts. NF-kappa B mediates the effect on DEC2, which upregulates IL-1 beta. Circadian clock has a direct effect on inflammation in human fibroblasts.
  • Kauttu, T.; Mustonen, H.; Vainionpää, S.; Krogerus, L.; Ilonen, I.; Rasanen, J.; Salo, J.; Puolakkainen, P. (2017)
    Clinically useful marker molecules for the progression of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) are lacking. Many adenocarcinomas and inflammatory conditions exhibit increased expression of ADAMs, 'a disintegrin and metalloproteinases'. We assessed the expression of five ADAMs (9, 10, 12, 17, 19) in three esophageal cell lines (Het-1A, OE19, OE33) by RT-PCR and Western blotting, and in human samples of normal esophagus, esophagitis, BE, Barrett's dysplasia, and EAC by RT-PCR, and in selected samples by immunohistochemistry. EAC patients showed increased mRNA expression of ADAMs 9, 12, 17 and 19, as compared to controls. At immunohistochemistry, ADAM9 and ADAM10 proteins were increased in EAC. Patient samples also showed increased mRNA expression of ADAM12 in esophagitis, of ADAM9 in BE, and of ADAMs 9, 12 and 19 in Barrett's dysplasia, as compared to controls. Two EAC cell lines showed increased ADAM9 mRNA. ADAM9 expression is increased in EAC. Its predecessors show increased ADAM9 mRNA expression. The importance of the alterations in ADAM expression for the development of EAC, and their use as marker molecules, warrant further studies.
  • Peuhkuri, Katri; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korpela, Riitta (2011)
  • Vilander, Laura M.; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Pettila, Ville (2015)
    Background: The risk of an individual to develop an acute kidney injury (AKI), or its severity, cannot be reliably predicted by common clinical risk factors. Whether genetic risk factors have an explanatory role poses an interesting question, however. Thus, we conducted a systematic literature review regarding genetic predisposition to AKI or outcome of AKI patients. Methods: We searched Ovid SP (MEDLINE) and EMBASE databases and found 4027 references to AKI. Based on titles and abstracts, we approved 37 articles for further analysis. Nine were published only as abstracts, leaving 28 original articles in the final analysis. We extracted the first author, year of publication, study design, clinical setting, number of studied patients, patients with AKI, ethnicity of patients, studied polymorphisms, endpoints, AKI definition, phenotype, significant findings, and data for quality scoring from each article. We summarized the findings and scored the quality of articles. Results: The articles were quite heterogeneous and of moderate quality (mean 6.4 of 10). Conclusions: Despite different gene polymorphisms with suggested associations with development or severity or outcome of AKI, definitive conclusions would require replication of associations in independent cohort studies and, preferably a hypothesis-free study design.
  • Stenman, Lotta K.; Holma, Reetta; Korpela, Riitta (2012)
  • Ahonen, Maria A.; Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Parviainen, Suvi J.; Liebisch, Gerhard; Höring, Marcus; Leidenius, Marjut; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin; Mikkola, Tomi S.; Törnquist, Kid; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna; Haridas, P. A. Nidhina; Olkkonen, Vesa M. (2021)
    MicroRNA-221-3p (miR-221-3p) is associated with both metabolic diseases and cancers. However, its role in terminal adipocyte differentiation and lipid metabolism are uncharacterized. miR-221-3p or its inhibitor was transfected into differentiating or mature human adipocytes. Triglyceride (TG) content and adipogenic gene expression were monitored, global lipidome analysis was carried out, and mechanisms underlying the effects of miR-221-3p were investigated. Finally, cross-talk between miR-221-3p expressing adipocytes and MCF-7 breast carcinoma (BC) cells was studied, and miR-221-3p expression in tumor-proximal adipose biopsies from BC patients analyzed. miR-221-3p overexpression inhibited terminal differentiation of adipocytes, as judged from reduced TG storage and gene expression of the adipogenic markers SCDI , GLUT4, FAS, DGATI /2, AP2, ATGL and AdipoQ, whereas the miR-221-3p inhibitor increased TG storage. Knockdown of the predicted miR-221-3p target, 14-3-3 gamma, had similar antiadipogenic effects as miR-221-3p overexpression, indicating it as a potential mediator of mir-221-3p function. Importantly, miR-221-3p overexpression inhibited de novo lipogenesis but increased the concentrations of ceramides and sphingomyelins, while reducing diacylglycerols, concomitant with suppression of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase, ATP citrate lyase, and acid ceramidase. miR-221-3p expression was elevated in tumor proximal adipose tissue from patients with invasive BC. Conditioned medium of miR-221-3p overexpressing adipocytes stimulated the invasion and proliferation of BC cells, while medium of the BC cells enhanced miR-221-3p expression in adipocytes. Elevated miR-221-3p impairs adipocyte lipid storage and differentiation, and modifies their ceramide, sphingomyelin, and diacylglycerol content. These alterations are relevant for metabolic diseases but may also affect cancer progression.
  • Charbonnel, Nathalie; Pages, Marie; Sironen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti (2014)
  • Goodman, Stuart B.; Pajarinen, Jukka; Yao, Zhenyu; Lin, Tzuhua (2019)
    When presented with an adverse stimulus, organisms evoke an immediate, pre-programmed, non-specific innate immune response. The purpose of this reaction is to maintain the organism's biological integrity and function, mitigate or eradicate the injurious source, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. The initial stage of this protective reaction is acute inflammation, which normally reduces or terminates the offending stimulus. As the inflammatory reaction recedes, the stage of tissue repair and regeneration follows. If the above sequence of events is perturbed, reconstitution of normal biological form and function will not be achieved. Dysregulation of these activities may result in incomplete healing, fibrosis, or chronic inflammation. Our laboratory has studied the reaction to wear particles from joint replacements as a paradigm for understanding the biological pathways of acute and chronic inflammation, and potential translational treatments to reconstitute lost bone. As inflammation is the cornerstone for healing in all anatomical locations, the concepts developed have relevance to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in all organ systems. To accomplish our goal, we developed novel in vitro and in vivo models (including the murine femoral continuous intramedullary particle infusion model), translational strategies including modulation of macrophage chemotaxis and polarization, and methods to interfere with key transcription factors NF kappa B and MyD88. We purposefully modified MSCs to facilitate bone healing in inflammatory scenarios: by preconditioning the MSCs, and by genetically modifying MSCs to first sense NF kappa B activation and then overexpress the anti-inflammatory pro-regenerative cytokine IL-4. These advancements provide significant translational opportunities to enhance healing in bone and other organs.
  • Lisboa, S. F.; Issy, A. C.; Biojone, C.; Montezuma, K.; Fattori, V.; Del-Bel, E. A.; Guimaraes, F. S.; Cunha, F. Q.; Verri, W. A.; Joca, S. R. L. (2018)
    Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests pro-inflammatory cytokines might play an important role in the neurobiology of schizophrenia and stress-related psychiatric disorders. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and it is widely expressed in brain regions involved in emotional regulation. Since IL-18 involvement in the neurobiology of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, remains unknown, this work aimed at investigating the behavior of IL-18 null mice (KO) in different preclinical models: 1. the prepulse inhibition test (PPI), which provides an operational measure of sensorimotor gating and schizophrenic-like phenotypes; 2. amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, a model predictive of antipsychotic activity; 3. resident intruder test, a model predictive of aggressive behavior. Furthermore, the animals were submitted to models used to assess depressive- and anxiety-like behavior. IL-18KO mice showed impaired baseline PPI response, which was attenuated by D-amphetamine at a dose that did not modify PPI response in wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting a hypodopaminergic prefrontal cortex function in those mice. D-Amphetamine, however, induced hyperlocomotion in IL-18KO mice compared to their WT counterparts, suggesting hyperdopaminergic activity in the midbrain. Moreover, IL-18KO mice presented increased basal levels of IL-1 beta levels in the hippocampus and TNF-alpha in the prefrontal cortex, suggesting an overcompensation of IL-18 absence by increased levels of other proinflammatory cytokines. Although no alteration was observed in the forced swimming or in the elevated plus maze tests in naive IL-18KO mice, these mice presented anxiogenic-like behavior after exposure to repeated forced swimming stress. In conclusion, deletion of the IL-18 gene resembled features similar to symptoms observed in schizophrenia (positive and cognitive symptoms, aggressive behavior), in addition to increased susceptibility to stress. The IL-18KO model, therefore, could provide new insights into how changes in brain immunological homeostasis induce behavioral changes related to psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.
  • Dubois, Adelaide; Galan, Maxime; Cosson, Jean-Francois; Gauffre, Bertrand; Henttonen, Heikki; Niemimaa, Jukka; Razzauti, Maria; Voutilainen, Liina; Vitalis, Renaud; Guivier, Emmanuel; Charbonnel, Nathalie (2017)
    Understanding howhost dynamics, including variations of population size and dispersal, may affect the epidemiology of infectious diseases through ecological and evolutionary processes is an active research area. Here we focus on a bank vole (Myodes glareolus) metapopulation surveyed in Finland between 2005 and 2009. Bank vole is the reservoir of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV), the agent of nephropathia epidemica (NE, a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal symptom) in humans. M. glareolus populations experience multiannual density fluctuations that may influence the level of genetic diversity maintained in bank voles, PUUV prevalence and NE occurrence. We examine bank vole metapopulation genetics at presumably neutral markers and immunerelated genes involved in susceptibility to PUUV (Tnf-promoter, Tlr4, Tlr7 and Mx2 gene) to investigate the links between population dynamics, microevolutionary processes and PUUV epidemiology. We show that genetic drift slightly and transiently affects neutral and adaptive genetic variability within the metapopulation. Gene flow seems to counterbalance its effects during the multiannual density fluctuations. The low abundance phase may therefore be too short to impact genetic variation in the host, and consequently viral genetic diversity. Environmental heterogeneity does not seem to affect vole gene flow, which might explain the absence of spatial structure previously detected in PUUV in this area. Besides, our results suggest the role of vole dispersal on PUUV circulation through sex-specific and density-dependent movements. We find little evidence of selection acting on immune-related genes within this metapopulation. Footprint of positive selection is detected at Tlr-4 gene in 2008 only. We observe marginally significant associations between Mx2 genotype and PUUV genogroups. These results show that neutral processes seem to be the main factors affecting the evolution of these immune-related genes at a contemporary scale, although the relative effects of neutral and adaptive forces could vary temporally with density fluctuations. Immune related gene polymorphism may in turn partly influence PUUV epidemiology in this metapopulation. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Törnblom, Sanna; Nisula, Sara; Vaara, Suvi T.; Poukkanen, Meri; Andersson, Sture; Pettilä, Ville; Pesonen, Eero (2019)
    Background Inflammation, reflected by high plasma interleukin-6 concentration, is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) in septic patients. Neutrophil activation has pathophysiological significance in experimental septic AKI. We hypothesized that neutrophil activation is associated with AKI in critically ill sepsis patients. Methods We measured plasma (n = 182) and urine (n = 118) activin A (a rapidly released cytosolic neutrophil protein), interleukin-8 (a chemotactic factor for neutrophils), myeloperoxidase (a neutrophil biomarker released in tissues), and interleukin-6 on intensive care unit admission (plasma and urine) and 24 hours later (plasma) in sepsis patients manifesting their first organ dysfunction between 24 hours preceding admission and the second calendar day in intensive care unit. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Results Plasma admission interleukin-8 (240 [60-971] vs 50 [19-164] pg/mL, P <.001) and activin A (845 [554-1895] vs 469 [285-862] pg/mL, P <.001) were but myeloperoxidase (169 [111-300] vs 144 [88-215] ng/mL, P = .059) was not higher among patients with AKI compared with those without. Urine admission interleukin-8 (50.4 [19.8-145.3] vs 9.5 [2.7-28.7] ng/mL, P <.001) and myeloperoxidase (7.7 [1.5-12.6] vs 1.9 [0.4-6.9] ng/mL, P <.001) were but activin A (9.7 [1.4-42.6] vs 4.0 [0.0-33.0] ng/mL, P = .064) was not higher in AKI than non-AKI patients. Urine myeloperoxidase correlated with urine interleukin-8 (R = .627, P <.001) but not with plasma myeloperoxidase (R = .131, P = .158). Conclusion Interleukin-8 in plasma and urine was associated with septic AKI. Elevated plasma activin A indicates intravascular neutrophil activation in septic AKI. Concomitant plasma and urine myeloperoxidase measurements suggest neutrophil accumulation into injured kidneys.
  • Santos, João Manuel; Heiniö, Camilla; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Quixabeira, Dafne C A; Siurala, Mikko; Havunen, Riikka; Butzow, Ralf; Zafar, Sadia; de Gruijl, Tanja; Lassus, Heini; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2020)
    BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancers often contain significant numbers of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that can be readily harnessed for adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT). However, the immunosuppressive ovarian tumor microenvironment and lack of tumor reactivity in TILs can limit the effectiveness of the therapy. We hypothesized that by using an oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5/3-E2F-D24-hTNFa-IRES-hIL2; TILT-123) to deliver tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) and interleukin-2 (IL-2), we could counteract immunosuppression, and enhance antitumor TIL responses in ovarian cancer (OVCA). METHODS: We established ex vivo tumor cultures freshly derived from patients with advanced OVCA and evaluated the effects of Ad5/3-E2F-D24-hTNFa-IRES-hIL2 or Ad5/3-E2F-D24 (the control virus without TNFa and IL-2) on TILs, cytokine response and tumor viability. Tumor reactivity was assessed by determining interferon gamma (IFNg) response of clinically relevant TILs towards autologous T-cell-depleted ex vivo tumor cultures pretreated with or without the aforementioned oncolytic adenoviruses. RESULTS: Treatment of ex vivo tumor cultures with Ad5/3-E2F-D24-hTNFa-IRES-hIL2 caused a substantial rise in proinflammatory signals: increased secretion of IFNg, CXCL10, TNFa and IL-2, and concomitant activation of CD4+ and CD8+ TILs. Potent tumor reactivity was seen, as clinically relevant TIL secreted high levels of IFNg in response to autologous T-cell-depleted ovarian ex vivo tumor cultures treated with Ad5/3-E2F-D24-hTNFa-IRES-hIL2. This phenomenon was independent of PD-L1 expression in tumor cells, a factor that determined the variability of IFNg responses seen in different patient samples. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-E2F-D24-hTNFa-IRES-hIL2 was able to rewire the ovarian tumor microenvironment to accommodate heightened antitumor TIL reactivity. Such effects may improve the clinical effectiveness of ACT with TILs in patients with advanced OVCA.
  • Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Havunen, Riikka; Hemminki, Akseli (2019)
    Introduction: Oncolytic adenoviruses are among the most studied oncolytic viruses because of their tumor selectivity, safety, and transgene-delivery capability. With a growing number of different immunotherapies against cancer, the extraordinary immunogenicity of the adenovirus has emerged as a differentiating strength. Enabling T-cell related therapies with oncolytic adenoviruses appears a promising approach due to its inherent ability to elicit responses from the adaptive immune compartment. Areas covered: These viruses have successfully enhanced both adoptive T-cell therapies and immune-checkpoint therapies. Oncolytic viruses induce several effects at the tumor and on the systemic level that help to circumvent current limitations of T-cells and related therapies, such as T-cell trafficking, tumor immune suppressivity and antigen spreading. Expert opinion: Taking into account the multitude of possibilities of treating cancer with immunotherapies, learning to optimize the combinations and administration strategies of these drugs, could lead to durable responses in patients with currently incurable cancers.
  • Hemminki, Otto; dos Santos, Joao Manuel; Hemminki, Akseli (2020)
    In this review, we discuss the use of oncolytic viruses in cancer immunotherapy treatments in general, with a particular focus on adenoviruses. These serve as a model to elucidate how versatile viruses are, and how they can be used to complement other cancer therapies to gain optimal patient benefits. Historical reports from over a hundred years suggest treatment efficacy and safety with adenovirus and other oncolytic viruses. This is confirmed in more contemporary patient series and multiple clinical trials. Yet, while the first viruses have already been granted approval from several regulatory authorities, room for improvement remains. As good safety and tolerability have been seen, the oncolytic virus field has now moved on to increase efficacy in a wide array of approaches. Adding different immunomodulatory transgenes to the viruses is one strategy gaining momentum. Immunostimulatory molecules can thus be produced at the tumor with reduced systemic side effects. On the other hand, preclinical work suggests additive or synergistic effects with conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In addition, the newly introduced checkpoint inhibitors and other immunomodulatory drugs could make perfect companions to oncolytic viruses. Especially tumors that seem not to be recognized by the immune system can be made immunogenic by oncolytic viruses. Logically, the combination with checkpoint inhibitors is being evaluated in ongoing trials. Another promising avenue is modulating the tumor microenvironment with oncolytic viruses to allow T cell therapies to work in solid tumors. Oncolytic viruses could be the next remarkable wave in cancer immunotherapy.