Browsing by Subject "NEURONAL AVALANCHES"

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  • Auno, Sami; Lauronen, Leena; Wilenius, Juha; Peltola, Maria; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Palva, Matias (2021)
    Objective: To examine the usability of long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs) in non-invasive localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) in refractory parietal lobe epilepsy (RPLE) patients. Methods: We analyzed 10 RPLE patients who had presurgical MEG and underwent epilepsy surgery. We quantified LRTCs with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) at four frequency bands for 200 cortical regions estimated using individual source models. We correlated individually the DFA maps to the distance from the resection area and from cortical locations of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Additionally, three clinical experts inspected the DFA maps to visually assess the most likely EZ locations. Results: The DFA maps correlated with the distance to resection area in patients with type II focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (p < 0:05), but not in other etiologies. Similarly, the DFA maps correlated with the IED locations only in the FCD II patients. Visual analysis of the DFA maps showed high interobserver agreement and accuracy in FCD patients in assigning the affected hemisphere and lobe. Conclusions: Aberrant LRTCs correlate with the resection areas and IED locations. Significance: This methodological pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of approximating cortical LRTCs from MEG that may aid in the EZ localization and provide new non-invasive insight into the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. (c) 2021 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
  • Bruining, Hilgo; Hardstone, Richard; Juarez-Martinez, Erika L.; Sprengers, Jan; Avramiea, Arthur-Ervin; Simpraga, Sonja; Houtman, Simon J.; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Dallares, Eva; Palva, Satu; Oranje, Bob; Matias Palva, J.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus (2020)
    Balance between excitation (E) and inhibition (I) is a key principle for neuronal network organization and information processing. Consistent with this notion, excitation-inhibition imbalances are considered a pathophysiological mechanism in many brain disorders including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, methods to measure E/I ratios in human brain networks are lacking. Here, we present a method to quantify a functional E/I ratio (fE/I) from neuronal oscillations, and validate it in healthy subjects and children with ASD. We define structural E/I ratio in an in silico neuronal network, investigate how it relates to power and long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) of the network's activity, and use these relationships to design the fE/I algorithm. Application of this algorithm to the EEGs of healthy adults showed that fE/I is balanced at the population level and is decreased through GABAergic enforcement. In children with ASD, we observed larger fE/I variability and stronger LRTC compared to typically developing children (TDC). Interestingly, visual grading for EEG abnormalities that are thought to reflect E/I imbalances revealed elevated fE/I and LRTC in ASD children with normal EEG compared to TDC or ASD with abnormal EEG. We speculate that our approach will help understand physiological heterogeneity also in other brain disorders.
  • Palva, Satu; Palva, J. Matias (2018)
    Sensorimotor predictions are essential for adaptive behavior. In natural environments, events that demand sensorimotor predictions unfold across many timescales, and corresponding temporal predictions (either explicit or implicit) should therefore emerge in brain dynamics. Neuronal oscillations are scale-specific processes found in several frequency bands. They underlie periodicity in sensorimotor processing and can represent temporal predictions via their phase dynamics. These processes build upon endogenous neural rhythmicity and adapt in response to exogenous timing demands. While much of the research on periodicity in neural processing has focused on subsecond oscillations, these fast-scale rhythms are in fact paralleled by critical-like, scale-free dynamics and fluctuations of brain activity at various timescales, ranging from seconds to hundreds of seconds. In this review, we put forth a framework positing that critical brain dynamics are essential for the role of neuronal oscillations in timing and that cross-frequency coupling flexibly organizes neuronal processing across multiple frequencies.