Browsing by Subject "NITROUS-ACID"

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  • Lu, Yiqun; Yan, Chao; Fu, Yueyun; Chen, Yan; Liu, Yiliang; Yang, Gan; Wang, Yuwei; Bianchi, Federico; Chu, Biwu; Zhou, Ying; Yin, Rujing; Baalbaki, Rima; Garmash, Olga; Deng, Chenjuan; Wang, Weigang; Liu, Yongchun; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Jiang, Jingkun; Kulmala, Markku; Wang, Lin (2019)
    Gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is known as one of the key precursors for atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) processes, but its measurement remains challenging. Therefore, a proxy method that is able to derive gaseous sulfuric acid concentrations from parameters that can be measured relatively easily and accurately is highly desirable for the atmospheric chemistry community. Although such methods are available for clean atmospheric environments, a proxy that works well in a polluted atmosphere, such as that found in Chinese megacities, is yet to be developed. In this study, the gaseous sulfuric acid concentration was measured in February-March 2018, in urban Beijing using a nitrate based -long time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (LToF-CIMS). A number of atmospheric parameters were recorded concurrently including the ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) intensity, the concentrations of O-3, NOx (sum of NO and NO2), SO2, and HONO, and aerosol particle number size distributions. A proxy for atmospheric daytime gaseous sulfuric acid concentration was derived via a statistical analysis method using the UVB intensity, [SO2], the condensation sink (CS), [O-3], and [HONO] (or [NOx]) as the predictor variables, where square brackets denote the concentrations of the corresponding species. In this proxy method, we considered the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid from reactions of SO2 and OH radicals during the daytime, and the loss of gaseous sulfuric acid due to its condensation onto the preexisting particles. In addition, we explored the formation of OH radicals from the conventional gas-phase photochemistry using O-3 as a proxy and from the photolysis of HONO using HONO (and subsequently NOx) as a proxy. Our results showed that the UVB intensity and [SO2] are dominant factors in the production of gaseous sulfuric acid, and that the simplest proxy could be constructed with the UVB intensity and [SO2] alone. When the OH radical production from both homogenously and heterogeneously formed precursors were considered, the relative errors were reduced by up to 20 %.
  • Li, Yuanyuan; Nie, Wei; Liu, Yuliang; Huang, Dandan; Xu, Zheng; Peng, Xiang; George, Christian; Yan, Chao; Tham, Yee Jun; Yu, Chuan; Xia, Men; Fu, Xiao; Wang, Xinfeng; Xue, Likun; Wang, Zhe; Xu, Zhengning; Chi, Xuguang; Wang, Tao; Ding, Aijun (2020)
    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is extensively used with the process of urbanization and potentially influences atmospheric chemistry, which is yet unclear. In this work, we demonstrated strong production of Cl-2 from illuminated KCl-coated TiO2 membranes and suggested an important daytime source of chlorine radicals. We found that water and oxygen were required for the reactions to proceed, and Cl-2 production increased linearly with the amount of coated KCl, humidity of the carrier gas, and light intensity. These results suggested that water promotes the reactivity of coated KCl via interaction with the crystal lattice to release free chloride ions (Cl-). The free Cl- transfer charges to O-2 via photoactivated TiO2 to form Cl-2 and probably the O-2(-) radical. In addition to Cl-2, ClO and HOCl were also observed via the complex reactions between Cl/Cl-2 and HOx. An intensive campaign was conducted in Shanghai, during which evident daytime peaks of Cl-2 were observed. Estimated Cl-2 production from TiO2 photocatalysis can be up to 0.2 ppb/h when the TiO2-containing surface reaches 20% of the urban surface, and highly correlated to the observed Cl-2. Our results suggest a non-negligible role of TiO2 in atmospheric photochemistry via altering the radical budget.
  • Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Tsai, Catalina; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L.; Weinheimer, Andrew; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Apel, Eric C.; Guenther, Alex; Kaser, Lisa; Yuan, Bin; Karl, Thomas; Haggerty, Julie; Hall, Samuel; Ullmann, Kirk; Smith, James; Ortega, John (2018)
    Here we report the measurement results of nitrous acid (HONO) and a suite of relevant parameters on the NCAR C-130 research aircraft in the southeastern US during the NOMADSS 2013 summer field study. The daytime HONO concentration ranged from low parts per trillion by volume (pptv) in the free troposphere (FT) to mostly within 5-15 pptv in the background planetary boundary layer (PBL). There was no discernible vertical HONO gradient above the lower flight altitude of 300m in the PBL, and the transport of ground surface HONO was not found to be a significant contributor to the tropospheric HONO budget. The total in situ HONO source mean (+/- 1 SD) was calculated as 53 (+/- 21) pptv h(-1) during the day. The upper-limit contribution from NOx-related reactions was 10 (+/- 5) pptv h(-1), and the contribution from photolysis of particulate nitrate (pNO(3)) was 38 (+/- 23) pptv h(-1), based on the measured pNO(3) concentrations and the median pNO(3) photolysis rate constant of 2.0 x 10 4 s(-1) determined in the laboratory using ambient aerosol samples. The photolysis of HONO contributed to less than 10% of the primary OH source. However, a recycling NOx source via pNO(3) photolysis was equivalent to similar to 2.3 x 10(-6) molm(-2) h(-1) in the air column within the PBL, a considerable supplementary NOx source in the low-NOx background area. Up to several tens of parts per trillion by volume of HONO were observed in power plant and urban plumes during the day, mostly produced in situ from precursors including NOx and pNO(3). Finally, there was no observable accumulation of HONO in the nocturnal residual layer and the nocturnal FT in the background southeastern US, with an increase in the HONO / NOx ratio of