Browsing by Subject "NUCLEATION MODE PARTICLES"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 21
  • Yli-Juuti, Taina; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Manninen, Hanna E.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kulmala, Markku (2016)
    We analyzed nanoparticle growth during new-particle-formation events based on ten years of measurements carried out at a boreal forest site in Hyytiala, Finland, concentrating on the sub-3 nm particles and the role of sulfuric acid in their growth. Growth rates of 1.5-3 nm diameter particles were determined from ion spectrometer measurements and compared with parameterized sulfuric acid concentration and other atmospheric parameters. The calculated growth rates from sulfuric acid condensation were on average 7.4% of the observed growth rates and the two did not correlate. These suggest that neither sulfuric acid monomer condensation nor coagulation of small sulfuric acid clusters was the primary growth mechanism in these atmospheric conditions. Also no clear sign of organic condensation being the single main growth mechanism was seen. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that several factors have comparative roles in the sub-3 nm growth.
  • Vana, Marko; Komsaare, Kaupo; Horrak, Urmas; Mirme, Sander; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kontkanen, Jenni; Manninen, Hanna E.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Noe, Steffen M.; Kulmala, Markku (2016)
    We analyzed the size distributions of atmospheric aerosol particles measured during 2013-2014 at Varrio (SMEAR I) in northern Finland, Hyytiala (SMEAR II) in southern Finland and Jarvselja (SMEAR-Estonia) in Estonia. The stations are located on a transect spanning from north to south over 1000 km and they represent different environments ranging from subarctic to the hemi-boreal. We calculated the characteristics of new-particle-formation events, such as the frequency of events, growth rate of nucleation mode particles, condensation and coagulation sinks, formation rate of 2 nm and 3 nm particles, and source rate of condensable vapors. We observed 59, 185 and 108 new-particle-formation events at Varrio, Hyytiala and Jarvselja, respectively. The frequency of the observed events showed an annual variation with a maximum in spring. The analysis revealed size dependence of growth rate at all locations. We found that the growth rate and source rate of a condensable vapor were the highest in Jarvselja and the lowest in Varrio. The condensation sink and particle formation rate were of a similar magnitude at Hyytiala and Jarvselja, but several times smaller at Varrio. Tracking the origin of air masses revealed that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles (3-25 nm) varied from north to south, with the highest concentrations at Jarvselja and lowest at Varrio. Trajectory analysis indicated that new-particle-formation events are large-scale phenomena that can take place concurrently at distant stations located even 1000 km apart. We found a total of 26 days with new-particle-formation events occurring simultaneously at all three stations.
  • Pirjola, L.; Rönkkö, T.; Saukko, E.; Parviainen, H.; Malinen, A.; Alanen, J.; Saveljeff, H. (2017)
    Exhaust emissions emitted by a non-road mobile machine were studied chasing a tractor in real-world conditions and repeating the same transient tests with a similar engine on an engine dynamometer where additionally, non-road steady state tests were carried out. The engines were equipped with an oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR)system, and they were fuelled by fossil diesel fuel with ultra-low sulphur content and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO). By substituting diesel fuel with HVO the on-road emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduced 20% and particle number 44%, the emission factors being EFNOx =1.62 +/- 0.04 g/kWh and EFN = (28.2 +/- 7.8) x 10(13) #/kWh. Similar trend was observed for NOx at laboratory although the emissions were somewhat smaller than on-road. In contrast to real-world, in the laboratory experiment the EFN was only 2% smaller with HVO than with diesel, and these emission factors were almost one order of magnitude smaller than observed on-road. The number size distribution and volatility measurements showed that in real-world experiments small nucleation mode particles were formed during uphill and during downhill in engine braking conditions. These were not observed at laboratory. However, nucleation mode particles were observed in the laboratory experiments at high load steady driving conditions. At steady state tests the emissions strongly depended on engine load and engine speed with both fuels. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Chen, Xuemeng; Virkkula, Aki; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Manninen, Hanna E.; Busetto, Maurizio; Lanconelli, Christian; Lupi, Angelo; Vitale, Vito; Del Guasta, Massimo; Grigioni, Paolo; Väänänen, Riikka; Duplissy, Ella-Maria; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku (2017)
    An air ion spectrometer (AIS) was deployed for the first time at the Concordia station at Dome C (75 degrees 06'S, 123 degrees 23'E; 3220 ma.s.l.), Antarctica during the period 22 December 2010-16 November 2011 for measuring the number size distribution of air ions. In this work, we present results obtained from this air ion data set together with aerosol particle and meteorological data. The main processes that modify the number size distribution of air ions during the measurement period at this high-altitude site included new particle formation (NPF, observed on 85 days), wind-induced ion formation (observed on 36 days), and ion production and loss associated with cloud/fog formation (observed on 2 days). For the subset of days when none of these processes seemed to operate, the concentrations of cluster ions (0.9-1.9 nm) exhibited a clear seasonality, with high concentrations in the warm months and low concentrations in the cold. Compared to event-free days, days with NPF were observed with higher cluster ion concentrations. A number of NPF events were observed with restricted growth below 10 nm, which were termed as suppressed NPF. There was another distinct feature, namely a simultaneous presence of two or three separate NPF and subsequent growth events, which were named as multi-mode NPF events. Growth rates (GRs) were determined using two methods: the appearance time method and the mode fitting method. The former method seemed to have advantages in characterizing NPF events with a fast GR, whereas the latter method is more suitable when the GR was slow. The formation rate of 2 nm positive ions (J(2)(+)) was calculated for all the NPF events for which a GR in the 2-3 nm size range could be determined. On average, J(2)(+) was about 0.014 cm(-3) s(-1). The ion production in relation to cloud/fog formation in the size range of 8-42 nm seemed to be a unique feature at Dome C, which has not been reported elsewhere. These ions may, however, either be multiply charged particles but detected as singly charged in the AIS, or be produced inside the instrument, due to the breakage of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), possibly related to the instrumental behaviour under the extremely cold condition. For the wind-induced ion formation, our observations suggest that the ions originated more likely from atmospheric nucleation of vapours released from the snow than from mechanical charging of shattered snow flakes and ice crystals.
  • Dada, Lubna; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Kontkanen, Jenni; Nieminen, Tuomo; Baalbaki, Rima; Ahonen, Lauri; Duplissy, Jonathan; Yan, Chao; Chu, Biwu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Lehtinen, Kari; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Kangasluoma, Juha (2020)
    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF), which is observed in many environments globally, is an important source of boundary-layer aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei, which affect both the climate and human health. To better understand the mechanisms behind NPF, chamber experiments can be used to simulate this phenomenon under well-controlled conditions. Recent advancements in instrumentation have made it possible to directly detect the first steps of NPF of molecular clusters (similar to 1-2 nm in diameter) and to calculate quantities such as the formation and growth rates of these clusters. Whereas previous studies reported particle formation rates as the flux of particles across a specified particle diameter or calculated them from measurements of larger particle sizes, this protocol outlines methods to directly quantify particle dynamics for cluster sizes. Here, we describe the instrumentation and analysis methods needed to quantify particle dynamics during NPF of sub-3-nm aerosol particles in chamber experiments. The methods described in this protocol can be used to make results from different chamber experiments comparable. The experimental setup, collection and post-processing of the data, and thus completion of this protocol, take from months up to years, depending on the chamber facility, experimental plan and level of expertise. Use of this protocol requires engineering capabilities and expertise in data analysis.
  • Arneth, Almut; Makkonen, Risto; Olin, Stefan; Paasonen, Pauli; Holst, Thomas; Kajos, Maija K.; Kulmala, Markku; Maximov, Trofim; Miller, Paul A.; Schurgers, Guy (2016)
    Disproportional warming in the northern high latitudes and large carbon stocks in boreal and (sub)arctic ecosystems have raised concerns as to whether substantial positive climate feedbacks from biogeochemical process responses should be expected. Such feedbacks occur when increasing temperatures lead, for example, to a net release of CO2 or CH4. However, temperature-enhanced emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been shown to contribute to the growth of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which is known to have a negative radiative climate effect. Combining measurements in Eastern Siberia with model-based estimates of vegetation and permafrost dynamics, BVOC emissions, and aerosol growth, we assess here possible future changes in ecosystem CO2 balance and BVOC-SOA interactions and discuss these changes in terms of possible climate effects. Globally, the effects of changes in Siberian ecosystem CO2 balance and SOA formation are small, but when concentrating on Siberia and the Northern Hemisphere the negative forcing from changed aerosol direct and indirect effects become notable - even though the associated temperature response would not necessarily follow a similar spatial pattern. While our analysis does not include other important processes that are of relevance for the climate system, the CO2 and BVOC-SOA interplay serves as an example for the complexity of the interactions between emissions and vegetation dynamics that underlie individual terrestrial processes and highlights the importance of addressing ecosystem-climate feedbacks in consistent, process-based model frameworks.
  • Chen, Xuemeng; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Paatero, Jussi; Paasonen, Pauli; Manninen, Hanna E.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku (2016)
    Most of the ion production in the atmosphere is attributed to ionising radiation. In the lower atmosphere, ionising radiation consists mainly of the decay emissions of radon and its progeny, gamma radiation of the terrestrial origin as well as photons and elementary particles of cosmic radiation. These types of radiation produce ion pairs via the ionisation of nitrogen and oxygen as well as trace species in the atmosphere, the rate of which is defined as the ionising capacity. Larger air ions are produced out of the initial charge carriers by processes such as clustering or attachment to preexisting aerosol particles. This study aimed (1) to identify the key factors responsible for the variability in ionising radiation and in the observed air ion concentrations, (2) to reveal the linkage between them and (3) to provide an in-depth analysis into the effects of ionising radiation on air ion formation, based on measurement data collected during 2003-2006 from a boreal forest site in southern Finland. In general, gamma radiation dominated the ion production in the lower atmosphere. Variations in the ionising capacity came from mixing layer dynamics, soil type and moisture content, meteorological conditions, long-distance transportation, snow cover attenuation and precipitation. Slightly similar diurnal patterns to variations in the ionising capacity were observed in air ion concentrations of the cluster size (0.8-1.7 nm in mobility diameters). However, features observed in the 0.81 nm ion concentration were in good connection to variations of the ionising capacity. Further, by carefully constraining perturbing variables, a strong dependency of the cluster ion concentration on the ionising capacity was identified, proving the functionality of ionising radiation in air ion production in the lower atmosphere. This relationship, however, was only clearly observed on new particle formation (NPF) days, possibly indicating that charges after being born underwent different processes on NPF days and non-event days and also that the transformation of newly formed charges to cluster ions occurred in a shorter timescale on NPF days than on non-event days.
  • Scott, C. E.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Riipinen, I.; D'Andrea, S. D.; Rap, A.; Carslaw, K. S.; Forster, P. M.; Artaxo, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Swietlicki, E.; Mann, G. W.; Pringle, K. J. (2015)
    The oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) gives a range of products, from semi-volatile to extremely low-volatility compounds. To treat the interaction of these secondary organic vapours with the particle phase, global aerosol microphysics models generally use either a thermodynamic partitioning approach (assuming instant equilibrium between semi-volatile oxidation products and the particle phase) or a kinetic approach (accounting for the size dependence of condensation). We show that model treatment of the partitioning of biogenic organic vapours into the particle phase, and consequent distribution of material across the size distribution, controls the magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect (AIE) due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). With a kinetic partitioning approach, SOA is distributed according to the existing condensation sink, enhancing the growth of the smallest particles, i.e. those in the nucleation mode. This process tends to increase cloud droplet number concentrations in the presence of biogenic SOA. By contrast, an approach that distributes SOA according to pre-existing organic mass restricts the growth of the smallest particles, limiting the number that are able to form cloud droplets. With an organically mediated new particle formation mechanism, applying a mass-based rather than a kinetic approach to partitioning reduces our calculated global mean AIE due to biogenic SOA by 24 %. Our results suggest that the mechanisms driving organic partitioning need to be fully understood in order to accurately describe the climatic effects of SOA.
  • Pikridas, M.; Sciare, J.; Freutel, F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; von der Weiden-Reinmueller, S. -L.; Borbon, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Merkel, M.; Crippa, M.; Kostenidou, E.; Psichoudaki, M.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Petäjä, T.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Beekmann, M.; Pandis, S. N. (2015)
    Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris, France, during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January to 15 February 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile laboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation (MEGAPOLI) project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only during summer on approximately 50% of the campaign days, assisted by the low condensation sink (about 10.7 +/- 5.9 x 10(-3) s(-1)). NPF events inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600m altitude onboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on the ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft also outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were attributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased particle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from the Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles with diameters exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at the Paris center was on average 6.9 +/- 8.7 x 10(4) and 12.1 +/- 8.6 x 10(4) cm(-3) during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease exponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from the city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was similar during both campaigns. During summer, one suburban site in the NE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher background number concentrations, while the particle number concentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a factor of 3 when it was downwind of Paris.
  • Kontkanen, Jenni; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Ahonen, Lauri; Kangasluoma, Juha; Manninen, Hanna E.; Hakala, Jani; Rose, Clemence; Sellegri, Karine; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Lin; Qi, Ximeng; Nie, Wei; Ding, Aijun; Yu, Huan; Lee, Shanhu; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku (2017)
    The measurement of sub-3 nm aerosol particles is technically challenging. Therefore, there is a lack of knowledge about the concentrations of atmospheric sub-3 nm particles and their variation in different environments. In this study, the concentrations of similar to 1-3 nm particles measured with a particle size magnifier (PSM) were investigated at nine sites around the world. Sub-3 nm particle concentrations were highest at the sites with strong anthropogenic influence. In boreal forest, measured particle concentrations were clearly higher in summer than in winter, suggesting the importance of biogenic precursor vapors in this environment. At all sites, sub-3 nm particle concentrations had daytime maxima, which are likely linked to the photochemical production of precursor vapors and the emissions of precursor vapors or particles from different sources. When comparing ion concentrations to the total sub-3 nm particle concentrations, electrically neutral particles were observed to dominate in polluted environments and in boreal forest during spring and summer. Generally, the concentrations of sub-3 nm particles seem to be determined by the availability of precursor vapors rather than the level of the sink caused by preexisting aerosol particles. The results also indicate that the formation of the smallest particles and their subsequent growth to larger sizes are two separate processes, and therefore studying the concentration of sub-3 nm particles separately in different size ranges is essential.
  • Mohr, Claudia; Thornton, Joel A.; Heitto, Arto; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Lutz, Anna; Riipinen, Ilona; Hong, Juan; Donahue, Neil M.; Hallquist, Mattias; Petaja, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Yli-Juuti, Taina (2019)
    Particles formed in the atmosphere via nucleation provide about half the number of atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei, but in many locations, this process is limited by the growth of the newly formed particles. That growth is often via condensation of organic vapors. Identification of these vapors and their sources is thus fundamental for simulating changes to aerosol-cloud interactions, which are one of the most uncertain aspects of anthropogenic climate forcing. Here we present direct molecular-level observations of a distribution of organic vapors in a forested environment that can explain simultaneously observed atmospheric nanoparticle growth from 3 to 50 nm. Furthermore, the volatility distribution of these vapors is sufficient to explain nanoparticle growth without invoking particle-phase processes. The agreement between observed mass growth, and the growth predicted from the observed mass of condensing vapors in a forested environment thus represents an important step forward in the characterization of atmospheric particle growth.
  • Peräkylä, Otso; Vogt, Matthias; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Laurila, Terhi; Kajos, Maija K.; Rantala, Pekka A.; Patokoski, Johanna; Aalto, Juho; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Ehn, Mikael; Sipila, Mikko; Paasonen, Pauli; Rissanen, Matti; Nieminen, Tuomo; Taipale, Risto; Keronen, Petri; Lappalainen, Hanna K.; Ruuskanen, Taina M.; Rinne, Janne; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Back, Jaana; Petaja, Tuukka (2014)
  • Rose, Clémence; Zha, Qiaozhi; Dada, Lubna; Yan, Chao; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Junninen, Heikki; Mazon, Stephany Buenrostro; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Sipilä, Mikko; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Bianchi, Federico; Kulmala, Markku (2018)
    A substantial fraction of aerosols, which affect air quality and climate, is formed from gaseous precursors. Highly oxygenated organic molecules (HOMs) are essential to grow the newly formed particles and have been evidenced to initiate ion-induced nucleation in chamber experiments in the absence of sulfuric acid. We investigate this phenomenon in the real atmosphere using an extensive set of state-of-the-art ion and mass spectrometers deployed in a boreal forest environment. We show that within a few hours around sunset, HOMs resulting from the oxidation of monoterpenes are capable of forming and growing ion clusters even under low sulfuric acid levels. In these conditions, we hypothesize that the lack of photochemistry and essential vapors prevents the organic clusters from growing past 6 nm. However, this phenomenon might have been a major source of particles in the preindustrial atmosphere and might also contribute to particle formation in the future and consequently affect the climate.
  • Wehner, B.; Werner, F.; Ditas, F.; Shaw, R. A.; Kulmala, M.; Siebert, H. (2015)
    During the CARRIBA (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiation and tuRbulence in the trade wInd regime over BArba-dos) campaign, the interaction between aerosol particles and cloud microphysical properties was investigated in detail, which also includes the influence of clouds on the aerosol formation. During two intensive campaigns in 2010 and 2011, helicopter-borne measurement flights were performed to investigate the thermodynamic, turbulent, microphysical, and radiative properties of trade-wind cumuli over Barbados. During these flights, 91 cases with increased aerosol particle number concentrations near clouds were detected. The majority of these cases are also correlated with enhanced irradiance in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral wavelength range. This enhancement reaches values up to a factor of 3.3 greater compared to background values. Thus, cloud boundaries provide a perfect environment for the production of precursor gases for new particle formation. Another feature of cloud edges is an increased turbulence, which may also enhance nucleation and particle growth. The observed events have a mean length of 100 m, corresponding to a lifetime of less than 300 s. This implies that particles with diameters of at least 7 nm grew several nanometers per minute, which corresponds to the upper end of values in the literature (Kulmala et al., 2004). Such high values cannot be explained by sulfuric acid alone; thus extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs) are probably involved here.
  • Kulmala, Markku; Petaja, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kujansuu, Joni; Ruuskanen, Taina; Ding, Aijun; Nie, Wei; Hu, Min; Wang, Zhibin; Wu, Zhijun; Wang, Lin; Worsnop, Douglas R. (2016)
    Formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles is a global phenomenon that has been observed to take place in even heavily-polluted environments. However, in all environments there appears to be a threshold value of the condensation sink (due to pre-existing aerosol particles) after which the formation rate of 3 nm particles is no longer detected. In China, new particle production has been observed at very high pollution levels (condensation sink about 0.1 s(-1)) in several megacities, including Beijing, Shanghai and Nanjing as well as in Pearl River Delta (PRD). Here we summarize the recent findings obtained from these studies and discuss the various implications these findings will have on future research and policy. (C) Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016
  • Lampilahti, Janne; Manninen, Hanna; Leino (os. Paananen), Katri; Väänänen, Riikka; Manninen, Antti; Buenrostro Mazon, Stephany N.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Leskinen, Matti; Enroth, Joonas; Bister, Marja; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Kangasluoma, Juha; Järvinen, Heikki; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku (2020)
    Recent studies have shown the importance of new particle formation (NPF) to global cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production, as well as to air pollution in megacities. In addition to the necessary presence of low-volatility vapors that can form new aerosol particles, both numerical and observational studies have shown that the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer (BL) plays an important role in NPF. Evidence from field observations suggests that roll vortices might be favorable for inducing NPF in a convective BL. However, direct observations and estimates of the potential importance of this phenomenon to the production of new aerosol particles are lacking. Here we show that rolls frequently induce NPF bursts along the horizontal circulations and that the small clusters and particles originating from these localized bursts grow in size similar to particles typically ascribed to atmospheric NPF that occur almost homogeneously at a regional scale. We outline a method to identify roll-induced NPF from measurements and, based on the collected data, estimate the impact of roll vortices on the overall aerosol particle production due to NPF at a boreal forest site (83% +/- 34% and 26% +/- 8% overall enhancement in particle formation for 3 and 10 nm particles, respectively). We conclude that the formation of roll vortices should be taken into account when estimating particle number budgets in the atmospheric BL.
  • Nieminen, T.; Yli-Juuti, T.; Manninen, H. E.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V. -M.; Kulmala, M. (2015)
    New particle formation (NPF) occurs frequently in the global atmosphere. During recent years, detailed laboratory experiments combined with intensive field observations in different locations have provided insights into the vapours responsible for the initial formation of particles and their subsequent growth. In this regard, the importance of sulfuric acid, stabilizing bases such as ammonia and amines as well as extremely low volatile organics, have been proposed. The instrumentation to observe freshly formed aerosol particles has developed to a stage where the instruments can be implemented as part of airborne platforms, such as aircrafts or a Zeppelin-type airship. Flight measurements are technically more demanding and require a greater detail of planning than field studies at the ground level. The high cost of flight hours, limited time available during a single research flight for the measurements, and different instrument payloads in Zeppelin airship for various flight missions demanded an analysis tool that would forecast whether or not there is a good chance for an NPF event. Here we present a methodology to forecast NPF event probability at the SMEAR II site in Hyytiala, Finland. This methodology was used to optimize flight hours during the PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas Aerosol Climate Interaction Study)-Zeppelin Northern mission in May-June 2013. Based on the existing knowledge, we derived a method for estimating the nucleation probability that utilizes forecast air mass trajectories, weather forecasts, and air quality model predictions. With the forecast tool we were able to predict the occurrence of NPF events for the next day with more than 90% success rate (10 out of 11 NPF event days correctly predicted). To our knowledge, no similar forecasts of NPF occurrence have been developed for other sites. This method of forecasting NPF occurrence could be applied also at other locations, provided that long-term observations of conditions favouring particle formation are available.
  • Kulmala, Markku; Horrak, Urmas; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Noppel, Madis; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Junninen, Heikki; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Noe, Steffen M.; Tammet, Hannes (2016)
    Atmospheric air ions, clusters and aerosol particles participate in a variety of atmospheric processes and considerably affect e.g. global climate and human health. When measured, air ions as well as atmospheric clusters and particles have been observed to be present practically always and everywhere. In this overview, we present a brief summary of the main achievements and legacy of the series of workshops organized mainly by the University of Helsinki and the University of Tartu. The legacy covers the development and standardization of new instruments, such as ion spectrometers, mass spectrometers and aerosol particle counters, as well as work toward theoretical understanding of new-particle formation and evolution of atmospheric clusters. One important legacy is the establishment of the SMEAR-Estonia station at Jarvselja.
  • Nieminen, Tuomo; Asmi, Ari; Dal Maso, Miikka; Aalto, Pasi P.; Keronen, Petri; Petaja, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Kerminen, Veli-Matti (2014)
  • Dos Santos, V. N.; Herrmann, E.; Manninen, H. E.; Hussein, T.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Merkel, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Hämeri, K. (2015)
    Air ion concentrations influence new particle formation and consequently the global aerosol as potential cloud condensation nuclei. We aimed to evaluate air ion concentrations and characteristics of new particle formation events (NPF) in the megacity of Paris, France, within the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric Pollution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) project. We measured air ion number size distributions (0.8-42 nm) with an air ion spectrometer and fine particle number concentrations (>6 nm) with a twin differential mobility particle sizer in an urban site of Paris between 26 June 2009 and 4 October 2010. Air ions were size classified as small (0.82 nm), intermediate (2-7 nm), and large (7-20 nm). The median concentrations of small and large ions were 670 and 680 cm 3, respectively, (sum of positive and negative polarities), whereas the median concentration of intermediate ions was only 20 cm 3, as these ions were mostly present during new particle formation bursts, i.e. when gas-to-particle conversion produced fresh aerosol particles from gas phase precursors. During peaks in traffic-related particle number, the concentrations of small and intermediate ions decreased, whereas the concentrations of large ions increased. Seasonal variations affected the ion population differently, with respect to their size and polarity. NPF was observed in 13% of the days, being most frequent in spring and late summer (April, May, July, and August). The results also suggest that NPF was favoured on the weekends in comparison to workdays, likely due to the lower levels of condensation sinks in the mornings of weekends (CS weekdays 09: 00: 18 x 10(-3) s(-1); CS weekend 09:00: 8 x 10(-3) s(-1)). The median growth rates (GR) of ions during the NPF events varied between 3 and 7 nm h(-1), increasing with the ion size and being higher on workdays than on weekends for intermediate and large ions. The median GR of small ions on the other hand were rather similar on workdays and weekends. In general, NPF bursts changed the diurnal cycle of particle number as well as intermediate and large ions by causing an extra peak between 09: 00 and 14:00. On average, during the NPF bursts the concentrations of intermediate ions were 8.5-10 times higher than on NPF non-event days, depending on the polarity, and the concentrations of large ions and particles were 1.5-1.8 and 1.2 times higher, respectively. Because the median concentrations of intermediate ions were considerably higher on NPF event days in comparison to NPF nonevent days, the results indicate that intermediate ion concentrations could be used as an indication for NPF in Paris. The results suggest that NPF was a source of ions and aerosol particles in Paris and therefore contributed to both air quality degradation and climatic effects, especially in the spring and summer.