Browsing by Subject "NURSING-HOME"

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  • Perttilä, Niko M.; Öhman, Hanna; Strandberg, Timo E.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Raivio, Minna; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa; Savikko, Niina; Tilvis, Reijo S.; Pitkälä, Kaisu H. (2018)
    Introduction No study has investigated how exercise modifies the effect of fall-related drugs (FRDs) on falls among people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objective The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise intervention and FRDs interact with fall risk among patients with AD. Methods In the FINALEX trial, community-dwelling persons with AD received either home-based or group-based exercise twice weekly for 1 year (n = 129); the control group received normal care (n = 65). The number of falls was based on spouses' fall diaries. We examined the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for falls among both non-users and users of various FRDs (antihypertensives, psychotropics, drugs with anticholinergic properties [DAPs]) in both control and combined intervention groups. Results Between the intervention and control groups, there was no difference in the number of falls among those without antihypertensives or psychotropics. In the intervention group taking antihypertensives, the IRR was 0.5 falls/person-year (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-0.6), while in the control group, the IRR was 1.5 falls/person-year (95% CI 1.2-1.8) [p <0.001 for group, p = 0.067 for medication, p <0.001 for interaction]. Among patients using psychotropics, the intervention group had an IRR of 0.7 falls/person-year (95% CI 0.6-0.9), while the control group had an IRR of 2.0 falls/person-year (95% CI 1.6-2.5) [p <0.001 for group, p = 0.071 for medication, p <0.001 for interaction]. There was a significant difference in falls between the intervention and control groups not using DAPs (0.6, 95% CI 0.5-0.7; 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.4), and between the intervention and control groups using DAPs (1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.3; 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1) [p <0.001 for group, p = 0.014 for medication, p = 0.97 for interaction]. Conclusion Exercise has the potential to decrease the risk for falls among people with AD using antihypertensives and psychotropics.
  • Billot, Maxime; Calvani, Riccardo; Urtamo, Annele; Sanchez-Sanchez, Juan Luis; Ciccolari-Micaldi, Cecilia; Chang, Milan; Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina; Wirnsberger, Gerhard; Sinclair, Alan; Vaquero-Pinto, Nieves; Jyväkorpi, Satu; Öhman, Hanna; Strandberg, Timo; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Smeets, Nick; Topinkova, Eva; Michalkova, Helena; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Rodriguez-Manas, Leocadio; Coelho-Junior, Helio; Broccatelli, Marianna; D'Elia, Maria Elena; Biscotti, Damiano; Marzetti, Emanuele; Freiberger, Ellen (2020)
    One of the most widely conserved hallmarks of aging is a decline in functional capabilities. Mobility loss is particularly burdensome due to its association with negative health outcomes, loss of independence and disability, and the heavy impact on quality of life. Recently, a new condition, physical frailty and sarcopenia, has been proposed to define a critical stage in the disabling cascade. Physical frailty and sarcopenia are characterized by weakness, slowness, and reduced muscle mass, yet with preserved ability to move independently. One of the strategies that have shown some benefits in combatting mobility loss and its consequences for older adults is physical activity. Here, we describe the opportunities and challenges for the development of physical activity interventions in people with physical frailty and sarcopenia. The aim of this article is to review age-related physio(patho)logical changes that impact mobility in old age and to provide recommendations and procedures in accordance with the available literature.
  • Pilotto, Alberto; Panza, Francesco; Copetti, Massimiliano; Simonato, Matteo; Sancarlo, Daniele; Gallina, Pietro; Strandberg, Timo; MPI AGE Project Investigators (2015)
    Background Older adults are often excluded from clinical trials. Decision making for administration of statins to older patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is under debate, particularly in frail older patients with comorbidity and high mortality risk. We tested the hypothesis that statin treatment in older patients with DM was differentially effective across strata of mortality risk assessed by the Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI), based on information collected with the Standardized Multidimensional Assessment Schedule for Adults and Aged Persons (SVaMA). Methods In this retrospective observational study, we estimated the mortality risk in 1712 community-dwelling subjects with DM >= 65 years who underwent a SVaMA evaluation to establish accessibility to homecare services/nursing home admission from 2005 to 2013 in the Padova Health District, Italy. Mild (MPI-SVaMA-1), moderate (MPI-SVaMA-2), and high (MPI-SVaMA-3) risk of mortality at baseline and propensity score-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of three-year mortality were calculated according to statin treatment. Results Higher MPI-SVaMA scores were associated with lower rates of statin treatment (MPI-SVaMA-1 = 39% vs MPI-SVaMA-2 = 36% vs MPI-SVaMA-3 = 24.9%. p= 85 years, respectively (interaction test p=0.812). Conclusions Statin treatment was significantly associated with reduced three-year mortality independently of age and multidimensional impairment in community-dwelling frail older patients with DM.