Browsing by Subject "NUTRIENT"

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  • Waldén, Pirjetta; Ollikainen, Markku; Kahiluoto, Helena (2020)
    The impact of carbon revenue on the profitability of agroforestry systems in comparison to monocultures is unexplored in regard to Sub-Saharan Africa. This study creates a multivariate model to evaluate the impact of carbon revenue on the profitability of agroforestry relative to the dominant monocultures in Ethiopia by using stylized plots. Yields and carbon stock changes of eight agroforestry systems were modeled based on data from agroforestry plots in the Ethiopian Central Rift Valley. According to our model, agroforestry was, on average, four times more profitable than the main monoculture systems (wheat, barley, maize, teff, sorghum, sugarcane and lentil) even when carbon revenues were excluded, primarily due to the higher prices of fruit produce. Carbon revenues were estimated using a plausible carbon price ranging from US$8/tCO2e to $40/tCO2e and carbon sequestration rates of 0.59 to 17.2 Mg C ha−1 year−1. The possibility of receiving carbon revenue increased the profitability of agroforestry by 0.5% when using the lowest utilized carbon price and carbon sequestration rate, by 20% when using the carbon price of $20 and the average carbon sequestration rate, and by 70% when using the highest price and highest sequestration rate of carbon. On average, carbon revenue increased the profitability of agroforestry by 150% in comparison to monoculture farming. We conclude that carbon income may have significant potential to motivate smallholders to convert to agroforestry when there is a proper management system, a sufficiently high carbon price and effective institutional support to mitigate the transition and transaction costs.
  • Virta, Leena; Soininen, Janne; Norkko, Alf (2020)
    Aim Global biodiversity loss has raised interest in understanding variation in diversity at different scales. In particular, studies conducted across large spatial gradients are crucial, because they can increase perspectives on how ecological patterns change relative to environmental factors and facilitate predictions of possible responses to environmental change. We explored the full extent of a brackish sea to test the hypotheses that: (a) benthic communities are defined by the limited ranges of species, controlled by varying drivers along a large environmental gradient; (b) the responses of taxonomic and functional community composition and turnover to the environmental gradient are different, thus highlighting the need to include both measures in ecological studies; and (c) diversity reaches the minimum at intermediate salinities (Remane curve) owing to the low adaptation of freshwater and marine species. Location A large environmental and spatial gradient spanning the entire Swedish coastline (c. 2,300 km; salinity 1.2-27.6), the Baltic Sea. Time period August 2018. Major taxa studied Benthic diatoms. Methods We assessed environmental drivers for the communities and calculated the taxonomic and functional alpha and beta diversity along the gradient. We also compared the taxonomic and functional composition and diversity of communities among areas with different salinity. Results We found support for the hypothesis of limited species ranges, because taxonomic beta diversity, mainly induced by changes in salinity and climate, was high, whereas functional beta diversity remained considerably lower, and the composition and diversity of communities, in addition to environmental drivers controlling the communities, differed between regions with different salinity. The lowest taxonomic diversity was found at intermediate salinities of 5-6. Main conclusions These findings advance understanding of large-scale patterns of benthic diversity, emphasize the importance of large gradient studies for a better understanding of general ecological patterns and highlight the vulnerability of brackish water ecosystems as ecologically important tipping-point realms.
  • Tallberg, Petra; Räike, Antti; Lukkari, Kaarina; Leivuori, Mirja; Lehtoranta, Jouni; Pitkänen, Heikki (2012)
  • Luukkonen, Panu K.; Tukiainen, Taru; Juuti, Anne; Sammalkorpi, Henna; Haridas, P. A. Nidhina; Niemelä, Onni; Arola, Johanna; Orho-Melander, Marju; Hakkarainen, Antti; Kovanen, Petri T.; Dwivedi, Om; Groop, Leif; Hodson, Leanne; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Oresic, Matej; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele (2020)
    Carriers of the hydroxysteroid 17-beta dehydrogenase 13 (HSD17B13) gene variant (rs72613567:TA) have a reduced risk of NASH and cirrhosis but not steatosis. We determined its effect on liver histology, lipidome, and transcriptome using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and RNA-seq. In carriers and noncarriers of the gene variant, we also measured pathways of hepatic fatty acids (de novo lipogenesis [ONLI and adipose tissue lipolysis [ATL] using (H2O)-H-2 and H-2-glycerol) and insulin sensitivity using H-3-glucose and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp) and plasma cytokines. Carriers and noncarriers had similar age, sex and BMI. Fibrosis was significantly less frequent while phospholipids, but not other lipids, were enriched in the liver in carriers compared with noncarriers. Expression of 274 genes was altered in carriers compared with noncarriers, consisting predominantly of downregulated inflammation-related gene sets. Plasma IL-6 concentrations were lower, but DNL, ATL and hepatic insulin sensitivity were similar between the groups. In conclusion, carriers of the HSD17B13 variant have decreased fibrosis and expression of inflammation-related genes but increased phospholipids in the liver. These changes are not secondary to steatosis, ONL, ATL, or hepatic insulin sensitivity. The increase in phospholipids and decrease in fibrosis are opposite to features of choline-deficient models of liver disease and suggest HSD17B13 as an attractive therapeutic target.
  • Spilling, Kristian; Camarena-Gómez, Maria-Teresa; Lipsewers, Tobias; Martinez-Varela, Alícia; Díaz-Rosas, Francisco; Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Silva, Nelson; von Dassow, Peter; Montecino, Vivian (2019)
    The ratio of inorganic nitrogen to phosphorus (NP) is projected to decrease in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) due to warming of the surface waters. In an enclosure experiment, we employed two levels of inorganic NP ratios (10 and 5) for three distinct plankton communities collected along the coast of central Chile (33°S). The primary effect of the NP treatment was related to different concentrations of NO3, which directly influenced the biomass of phytoplankton. In addition, low inorganic NP ratio reduced the seston NP and Chl a-C ratios, and there were some effects on the plankton community composition, e.g., benefitting Synechococcus spp. in some communities. One of the communities was clearly top-down controlled and trophic transfer to grazers was up to 5.8% during the 12 day experiment. Overall, the initial, natural plankton community composition was more important for seston stoichiometry and trophic transfer than the manipulation of the inorganic NP ratio, highlighting the importance of plankton community structure for marine ecosystem functioning.
  • Jilbert, Tom; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Veldhuijzen, Simon; Reed, Daniel C.; Helmond, Niels A. G. M.; Hermans, Martijn; Slomp, Caroline P. (2021)
    Hypoxia has occurred intermittently in the Baltic Sea since the establishment of brackish-water conditions at similar to 8,000 years B.P., principally as recurrent hypoxic events during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA). Sedimentary phosphorus release has been implicated as a key driver of these events, but previous paleoenvironmental reconstructions have lacked the sampling resolution to investigate feedbacks in past iron-phosphorus cycling on short timescales. Here we employ Laser Ablation (LA)-ICP-MS scanning of sediment cores to generate ultra-high resolution geochemical records of past hypoxic events. We show that in-phase multidecadal oscillations in hypoxia intensity and iron-phosphorus cycling occurred throughout these events. Using a box model, we demonstrate that such oscillations were likely driven by instabilities in the dynamics of iron-phosphorus cycling under preindustrial phosphorus loads, and modulated by external climate forcing. Oscillatory behavior could complicate the recovery from hypoxia during future trajectories of external loading reductions.
  • Sihvonen, Matti Juhani; Hyytiäinen, Kari Petri; Valkama, Elena; Turtola, Eila (2018)
    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are both essential plant nutrients. However, their joint response to plant growth is seldom described by models. This study provides an approach for modeling the joint impact of inorganic N and P fertilization on crop production, considering the P supplied by the soil, which was approximated using the soil test P (STP). We developed yield response models for Finnish spring barley crops (Hordeum vulgare L.) for clay and coarse-textured soils by using existing extensive experimental datasets and nonlinear estimation techniques. Model selection was based on iterative elimination from a wide diversity of plausible model formulations. The Cobb-Douglas type model specification, consisting of multiplicative elements, performed well against independent validation data, suggesting that the key relationships that determine crop responses are captured by the models. The estimated models were extended to dynamic economic optimization of fertilization inputs. According to the results, a fair STP level should be maintained on both coarse-textured soils (9.9 mg L-1 a(-1)) and clay soils (3.9 mg L-1 a(-1)). For coarse soils, a higher steady-state P fertilization rate is required (21.7 kg ha(-1) a(-1)) compared with clay soils (6.75 kg ha(-1) a(-1)). The steady-state N fertilization rate was slightly higher for clay soils (102.4 kg ha(-1) a(-1)) than for coarse soils (95.8 kg ha(-1) a(-1)). This study shows that the iterative elimination of plausible functional forms is a suitable method for reducing the effects of structural uncertainty on model output and optimal fertilization decisions.
  • EFSA Panel Nutr Novel Foods Food A; Turck, Dominique; Heinonen, Marina (2019)
    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Nutrition, Novel Foods and Allergens (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on nicotinamide riboside chloride as a novel food (NF) pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2015/2283, including an evaluation of the safety of its use in food supplements as a source of niacin, and the bioavailability of nicotinamide from this source, in the context of Directive 2002/46/EC. The NF, a synthetic form of nicotinamide riboside, is proposed to be used in food supplements for the healthy adult population at levels up to 300 mg/day. The production process, composition, specifications, batch-to-batch variability and stability of the NF do not raise safety concerns. Animal and human data indicate that the NF contributes to the nicotinamide body pool. There are no concerns regarding genotoxicity. Human studies do not raise safety concerns. The proposed maximum use level corresponds to an amount of nicotinamide, which is sixfold lower than the tolerable upper intake level (UL) set for adults, excluding pregnant and lactating women. The margin of exposure (MoE) of 70 derived from repeated dose toxicity studies with rats and dogs is considered sufficient for the adult population, excluding pregnant and lactating women. Regarding these two population groups, the MoE of 76 derived from a developmental toxicity study in rats is considered insufficient in the absence of data which could justify accepting a MoE lower than 100. The Panel concludes that the NF is safe under the proposed conditions of use for the healthy adult population, excluding pregnant and lactating women, and that an intake of the NF up to 230 mg/day is safe for pregnant and lactating women. The Panel also concludes that the NF is a source from which nicotinamide, a form of niacin, is bioavailable. (C) 2019 European Food Safety Authority. EFSA Journal published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd on behalf of European Food Safety Authority.
  • Majaneva, Markus; Blomster, Jaanika; Mueller, Susann; Autio, Riitta; Majaneva, Sanna; Hyytiainen, Kirsi; Nagai, Satoshi; Rintala, Janne-Markus (2017)
    To determine community composition and physiological status of early spring sea-ice organisms, we collected sea-ice, slush and under-ice water samples from the Baltic Sea. We combined light microscopy, HPLC pigment analysis and pyrosequencing, and related the biomass and physiological status of sea-ice algae with the protistan community composition in a new way in the area. In terms of biomass, centric diatoms including a distinct Melosira arctica bloom in the upper intermediate section of the fast ice, dinoflagellates, euglenoids and the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon sp. predominated in the sea-ice sections and unidentified flagellates in the slush. Based on pigment analyses, the ice-algal communities showed no adjusted photosynthetic pigment pools throughout the sea ice, and the bottom-ice communities were not shade-adapted. The sea ice included more characteristic phototrophic taxa (49%) than did slush (18%) and under-ice water (37%). Cercozoans and ciliates were the richest taxon groups, and the differences among the communities arose mainly from the various phagotrophic protistan taxa inhabiting the communities. The presence of pheophytin a coincided with an elevated ciliate biomass and read abundance in the drift ice and with a high Eurytemora affinis read abundance in the pack ice, indicating that ciliates and Eurytemora affinis were grazing on algae. (C) 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
  • Happonen, Konsta; Aalto, Juha; Kemppinen, Julia; Niittynen, Pekka; Virkkala, Anna-Maria; Luoto, Miska (2019)
    The functional composition of plant communities is a critical modulator of climate change impacts on ecosystems, but it is not a simple function of regional climate. In the Arctic tundra, where climate change is proceeding the most rapidly, communities have not shifted their trait composition as predicted by spatial temperature-trait relationships. Important causal pathways are thus missing from models of trait composition change. Here, we study causes of plant community functional variation in an oroarctic tundra landscape in Kilpisjarvi, Finland. We consider the community-weighted means of plant vegetative height, as well as two traits related to the leaf economic spectrum. Specifically, we model their responses to locally measured summer air temperature, snow conditions, and soil resource levels. For each of the traits, we also quantify the importance of intraspecific trait variation (ITV) for between-community functional differences and trait-environment matching. Our study shows that in a tundra landscape (1) snow is the most influential abiotic variable affecting functional composition, (2) vegetation height is under weak local environmental control, whereas leaf economics is under strong local environmental control, (3) the relative magnitude of ITV differs between traits, and (4) ITV is not very consequential for community-level trait-environment relationships. Our analyses highlight the importance of winter conditions for community functional composition in seasonal areas. We show that winter climate change can either amplify or counter the effects summer warming, depending on the trait.
  • Virta, Leena; Gammal, Johanna; Järnström, Marie; Bernard, Guillaume; Soininen, Janne; Norkko, Joanna; Norkko, Alf (2019)
    Abstract The current decrease in biodiversity affects all ecosystems, and the impacts of diversity on ecosystem functioning need to be resolved. So far, marine studies about diversity?ecosystem productivity-relationships have concentrated on small-scale, controlled experiments, with often limited relevance to natural ecosystems. Here, we provide a real-world study on the effects of microorganismal diversity (measured as the diversity of benthic diatom communities) on ecosystem productivity (using chlorophyll a concentration as a surrogate) in a heterogeneous marine coastal archipelago. We collected 78 sediment cores at 17 sites in the northern Baltic Sea and found exceptionally high diatom diversity (328 observed species). We used structural equation models and quantile regression to explore relationships between diatom diversity and productivity. Previous studies have found contradictory results in the relationship between microorganismal diversity and ecosystem productivity, but we showed a linear and positive basal relationship between diatom diversity and productivity, which indicates that diatom diversity most likely forms the lowest boundary for productivity. Thus, although productivity can be high even when diatom diversity is low, high diatom diversity supports high productivity. The trait composition was more effective than taxonomical composition in showing such a relationship, which could be due to niche complementarity. Our results also indicated that environmental heterogeneity leads to substantial patchiness in the diversity of benthic diatom communities, mainly induced by the variation in sediment organic matter content. Therefore, future changes in precipitation and river runoff and associated changes in the quality and quantity of organic matter in the sea, will also affect diatom communities and, hence, ecosystem productivity. Our study suggests that benthic microorganisms are vital for ecosystem productivity, and together with the substantial heterogeneity of coastal ecosystems, they should be considered when evaluating the potential productivity of coastal areas.
  • Thomas, H. J. D.; Myers-Smith, I. H.; Bjorkman, A. D.; Elmendorf, S. C.; Blok, D.; Cornelissen, J. H. C.; Forbes, B. C.; Hollister, R. D.; Normand, S.; Prevey, J. S.; Rixen, C.; Schaepman-Strub, G.; Wilmking, M.; Wipf, S.; Cornwell, W. K.; Kattge, J.; Goetz, S. J.; Guay, K. C.; Alatalo, J. M.; Anadon-Rosell, A.; Angers-Blondin, S.; Berner, L. T.; Bjork, R. G.; Buchwal, A.; Buras, A.; Carbognani, M.; Christie, K.; Collier, L. Siegwart; Cooper, E. J.; Eskelinen, A.; Frei, E. R.; Grau, O.; Grogan, P.; Hallinger, M.; Heijmans, M. M. P. D.; Hermanutz, L.; Hudson, J. M. G.; Huelber, K.; Iturrate-Garcia, M.; Iversen, C. M.; Jaroszynska, F.; Johnstone, J. F.; Kaarlejärvi, E.; Kulonen, A.; Lamarque, L. J.; Levesque, E.; Little, C. J.; Michelsen, A.; Milbau, A.; Nabe-Nielsen, J.; Nielsen, S. S.; Ninot, J. M.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Olofsson, J.; Onipchenko, V. G.; Petraglia, A.; Rumpf, S. B.; Semenchuk, P. R.; Soudzilovskaia, N. A.; Spasojevic, M. J.; Speed, J. D. M.; Tape, K. D.; te Beest, M.; Tomaselli, M.; Trant, A.; Treier, U. A.; Venn, S.; Vowles, T.; Weijers, S.; Zamin, T.; Atkin, O. K.; Bahn, M.; Blonder, B.; Campetella, G.; Cerabolini, B. E. L.; Chapin, F. S.; Dainese, M.; de Vries, F. T.; Diaz, S.; Green, W.; Jackson, R. B.; Manning, P.; Niinemets, U.; Ozinga, W. A.; Penuelas, J.; Reich, P. B.; Schamp, B.; Sheremetev, S.; van Bodegom, P. M. (2019)
    Aim Plant functional groups are widely used in community ecology and earth system modelling to describe trait variation within and across plant communities. However, this approach rests on the assumption that functional groups explain a large proportion of trait variation among species. We test whether four commonly used plant functional groups represent variation in six ecologically important plant traits. Location Tundra biome. Time period Data collected between 1964 and 2016. Major taxa studied 295 tundra vascular plant species. Methods We compiled a database of six plant traits (plant height, leaf area, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content, leaf nitrogen, seed mass) for tundra species. We examined the variation in species-level trait expression explained by four traditional functional groups (evergreen shrubs, deciduous shrubs, graminoids, forbs), and whether variation explained was dependent upon the traits included in analysis. We further compared the explanatory power and species composition of functional groups to alternative classifications generated using post hoc clustering of species-level traits. Results Traditional functional groups explained significant differences in trait expression, particularly amongst traits associated with resource economics, which were consistent across sites and at the biome scale. However, functional groups explained 19% of overall trait variation and poorly represented differences in traits associated with plant size. Post hoc classification of species did not correspond well with traditional functional groups, and explained twice as much variation in species-level trait expression. Main conclusions Traditional functional groups only coarsely represent variation in well-measured traits within tundra plant communities, and better explain resource economic traits than size-related traits. We recommend caution when using functional group approaches to predict tundra vegetation change, or ecosystem functions relating to plant size, such as albedo or carbon storage. We argue that alternative classifications or direct use of specific plant traits could provide new insights for ecological prediction and modelling.