Browsing by Subject "OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE"

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  • Obeidat, Ma'en; Wain, Louise V.; Shrine, Nick; Kalsheker, Noor; Artigas, Maria Soler; Repapi, Emmanouela; Burton, Paul R.; Johnson, Toby; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhai, Guangju; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Albrecht, Eva; Igl, Wilmar; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Cadby, Gemma; Hui, Jennie; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hadley, David; McArdle, Wendy L.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Barroso, Ines; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Mangino, Massimo; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; Glaeser, Sven; Homuth, Georg; Voelzke, Henry; Deloukas, Panos; Granell, Raquel; Henderson, John; Grkovic, Ivica; Jankovic, Stipan; Zgaga, Lina; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; Wilson, James F.; Heinrich, Joachim; Imboden, Medea; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Mustelin, Linda; Surakka, Ida; Kaprio, Jaakko; SpiroMeta Consortium (2011)
    RATIONALE: Lung function measures are heritable traits that predict population morbidity and mortality and are essential for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Variations in many genes have been reported to affect these traits, but attempts at replication have provided conflicting results. Recently, we undertook a meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) results for lung function measures in 20,288 individuals from the general population (the SpiroMeta consortium). OBJECTIVES: To comprehensively analyse previously reported genetic associations with lung function measures, and to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genomic regions are associated with lung function in a large population sample. METHODS: We analysed association for SNPs tagging 130 genes and 48 intergenic regions (+/-10 kb), after conducting a systematic review of the literature in the PubMed database for genetic association studies reporting lung function associations. RESULTS: The analysis included 16,936 genotyped and imputed SNPs. No loci showed overall significant association for FEV(1) or FEV(1)/FVC traits using a carefully defined significance threshold of 1.3×10(-5). The most significant loci associated with FEV(1) include SNPs tagging MACROD2 (P = 6.81×10(-5)), CNTN5 (P = 4.37×10(-4)), and TRPV4 (P = 1.58×10(-3)). Among ever-smokers, SERPINA1 showed the most significant association with FEV(1) (P = 8.41×10(-5)), followed by PDE4D (P = 1.22×10(-4)). The strongest association with FEV(1)/FVC ratio was observed with ABCC1 (P = 4.38×10(-4)), and ESR1 (P = 5.42×10(-4)) among ever-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Polymorphisms spanning previously associated lung function genes did not show strong evidence for association with lung function measures in the SpiroMeta consortium population. Common SERPINA1 polymorphisms may affect FEV(1) among smokers in the general population.
  • Malhotra, Rajneesh; Kurian, Nisha; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Fanyi; Monkley, Susan; DeMicco, Amy; Clausen, Ib G.; Dellgren, Göran; Edenro, Goran; Ahdesmaki, Miika J.; Clausen, Maryam; Oberg, Lisa; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Belfield, Graham; Vaarala, Outi (2017)
    Background BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRDT and BRD4) belong to the family of bromodomain containing proteins, which form a class of transcriptional co-regulators. BET proteins bind to acetylated lysine residues in the histones of nucleosomal chromatin and function either as co-activators or co-repressors of gene expression. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities resulting in hyperacetylation of histones has been identified in COPD. We hypothesized that pan-BET inhibitor (JQ1) treatment of BET protein interactions with hyperacety-lated sites in the chromatin will regulate excessive activation of pro-inflammatory genes in key inflammatory drivers of alveolar macrophages (AM) in COPD. Methods and findings Transcriptome analysis of AM from COPD patients indicated up-regulation of macrophage M1 type genes upon LPS stimulation. Pan-BET inhibitor JQ1 treatment attenuated expression of multiple genes, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and regulators of innate and adaptive immune cells. We demonstrated for the first time that JQ1 differentially modulated LPS-induced cytokine release from AM or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of COPD patients compared to PBMC of healthy controls. Using the BET regulated gene signature, we identified a subset of COPD patients, which we propose to benefit from BET inhibition. Conclusions This work demonstrates that the effects of pan-BET inhibition through JQ1 treatment of inflammatory cells differs between COPD patients and healthy controls, and the expression of BET protein regulated genes is altered in COPD. These findings provide evidence of histone hyperacetylation as a mechanism driving chronic inflammatory changes in COPD.
  • Kukkonen, Mari K.; Tiili, Emmi; Vehmas, Tapio; Oksa, Panu; Piirilä, Päivi; Hirvonen, Ari (2013)
  • Ryynanen, Olli-Pekka; Soini, Erkki J.; Lindqvist, Ari; Kilpelainen, Maritta; Laitinen, Tarja (2013)
    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased mortality and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared with the general population. The objective of this study was to identify clinical characteristics which predict mortality and very poor HRQoL among the COPD population and to develop a Bayesian prediction model. Methods: The data consisted of 738 patients with COPD who had visited the Pulmonary Clinic of the Helsinki and Turku University Hospitals during 1995-2006. The data set contained 49 potential predictor variables and two outcome variables: survival (dead/alive) and HRQoL measured with a 15D instrument (very poor HRQoL <0.70 vs. typical HRQoL >= 0.70). In the first phase of model validation we randomly divided the material into a training set (n = 538), and a test set (n = 200). This procedure was repeated ten times in random fashion to obtain independently created training sets and corresponding test sets. Modeling was performed by using the training set, and each model was tested by using the corresponding test set, repeated in each training set. In the second phase the final model was created by using the total material and eighteen most predictive variables. The performance of six logistic regressions approaches were shown for comparison purposes. Results: In the final model, the following variables were associated with mortality or very poor HRQoL: age at onset, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, alcohol abuse, cancer, psychiatric disease, body mass index, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) % of predicted, atrial fibrillation, and prolonged QT time in ECG. The prediction accuracy of the model was 77%, sensitivity 0.30, specificity 0.95, positive predictive value 0.68, negative predictive value 0.78, and area under the ROC curve 0.69. While the sensitivity of the model reminded limited, good specificity, moderate accuracy, comparable or better performance in classification and better performance in variable selection and data usage in comparison to the logistic regression approaches, and positive and negative predictive values indicate that the model has potential in predicting mortality and very poor HRQoL in COPD patients. Conclusion: We developed a Bayesian prediction model which is potentially useful in predicting mortality and very poor HRQoL in patients with COPD.
  • Heikkilä, Juha Markus; Parkkamäki, Stina; Salimäki, Johanna; Westermarck, Sari; Pohjanoksa-Mantyla, Marika (2018)
    Background and purpose: COPD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although medication counseling interventions by pharmacists have been found to support the management of COPD, little is known about pharmacists' knowledge concerning COPD and regular practices and perceptions concerning medication counseling of COPD patients. The purpose of this study was to research these topics among Finnish community pharmacists. Materials and methods: In January 2017, an electronic survey was e-mailed to Finnish community pharmacies (n=741) via the Association of the Finnish Pharmacies. One pharmacist from each pharmacy, preferably a specialist in asthma, was invited to answer the survey. Results: Completed responses were received from 263 pharmacists (response rate =35%), of whom 196 pharmacists were specialists in asthma. Response rate among asthma pharmacists was 42%. Pharmacists were positive about their role in medication counseling and in support of the self-management of COPD patients. COPD-related knowledge was self-assessed as being good and was on a good level in respect of basic facts. However, almost half (46%) of the pharmacists did not know that COPD is considered a national public health issue, and similar to 50% of the pharmacists were not familiar with the current care guideline on COPD. Medication counseling was found to be more medicinal product-driven and less advisory concerning lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation and physical exercise. Conclusion: Although the pharmacists' knowledge of COPD was good on general topics, there were some gaps in their knowledge on the current care guideline and status of the disease. Pharmacists should more systematically individually target medication counseling according to patients' needs. In addition, lifestyle treatments, including smoking cessation and physical exercise, should be part of the medication counseling.
  • Kainu, Annette; Rouhos, Annamari; Sovijärvi, Anssi; Lindqvist, Ari; Sarna, Seppo; Lundback, Bo (2013)
  • Sundar, Isaac K.; Yin, Qiangzong; Baier, Brian S.; Yan, Li; Mazur, Witold; Li, Dongmei; Susiarjo, Martha; Rahman, Irfan (2017)
    Background: Epigenetics changes have been shown to be affected by cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoke (CS)-mediated DNA methylation can potentially affect several cellular and pathophysiological processes, acute exacerbations, and comorbidity in the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to determine whether genome-wide lung DNA methylation profiles of smokers and patients with COPD were significantly different from non-smokers. We isolated DNA from parenchymal lung tissues of patients including eight lifelong non-smokers, eight current smokers, and eight patients with COPD and analyzed the samples using Illumina's Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Results: Our data revealed that the differentially methylated genes were related to top canonical pathways (e.g., G beta gamma signaling, mechanisms of cancer, and nNOS signaling in neurons), disease and disorders (organismal injury and abnormalities, cancer, and respiratory disease), and molecular and cellular functions (cell death and survival, cellular assembly and organization, cellular function and maintenance) in patients with COPD. The genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identified suggestive genes, such as NOS1AP, TNFAIP2, BID, GABRB1, ATXN7, and THOC7 with DNA methylation changes in COPD lung tissues that were further validated by pyrosequencing. Pyrosequencing validation confirmed hyper-methylation in smokers and patients with COPD as compared to non-smokers. However, we did not detect significant differences in DNA methylation for TNFAIP2, ATXN7, and THOC7 genes in smokers and COPD groups despite the changes observed in the genome-wide analysis. Conclusions: Our study suggests that DNA methylation in suggestive genes, such as NOS1AP, BID, and GABRB1 may be used as epigenetic signatures in smokers and patients with COPD if the same is validated in a larger cohort. Future studies are required to correlate DNA methylation status with transcriptomics of selective genes identified in this study and elucidate their role and involvement in the progression of COPD and its exacerbations.
  • Kankaanranta, Hannu; Kauppi, Paula; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Ilmarinen, Pinja (2016)
    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Most studies with asthma have been performed in patients being otherwise healthy. However, in real life, comorbid diseases are very common in adult patients. We review here the emerging comorbid conditions to asthma such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2), and cardiac and psychiatric diseases. Their role as risk factors for incident asthma and whether they affect clinical asthma are evaluated. Obesity, independently or as a part of metabolic syndrome, DM2, and depression are risk factors for incident asthma. In contrast, the effects of comorbidities on clinical asthma are less well-known and mostly studies are lacking. Cross-sectional studies in obese asthmatics suggest that they may have less well controlled asthma and worse lung function. However, no long-term clinical follow-up studies with these comorbidities and asthma were identified. These emerging comorbidities often occur in the same multimorbid adult patient and may have in common metabolic pathways and inflammatory or other alterations such as early life exposures, systemic inflammation, inflammasome, adipokines, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, lung mechanics, mitochondrial dysfunction, disturbed nitric oxide metabolism, and leukotrienes.
  • Nieminen, Pentti; Panychev, Dmitry; Lyalyushkin, Sergei; Komarov, German; Nikanov, Alexander; Borisenko, Mark; Kinnula, Vuokko L.; Toljamo, Tuula (2013)
  • Imboden, Medea; Wielscher, Matthias; Rezwan, Faisal I.; Amaral, Andre F. S.; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Jeong, Ayoung; Beckmeyer-Borowko, Anna; Harris, Sarah E.; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.; Flexeder, Claudia; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Schulz, Holger; Chen, Su; Sunny, Shadia Khan; Karmaus, Wilfried J. J.; Jiang, Yu; Erhart, Gertraud; Kronenberg, Florian; Arathimos, Ryan; Sharp, Gemma C.; Henderson, Alexander John; Fu, Yu; Piirilä, Päivi; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Ollikainen, Miina; Johansson, Asa; Gyllensten, Ulf; de Vries, Maaike; van der Plaat, Diana A.; de Jong, Kim; Boezen, H. Marike; Hall, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Holloway, John W.; Jarvis, Deborah; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M. (2019)
    Previous reports link differential DNA methylation (DNAme) to environmental exposures that are associated with lung function. Direct evidence on lung function DNAme is, however, limited. We undertook an agnostic epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) on pre-bronchodilation lung function and its change in adults. In a discovery-replication EWAS design, DNAme in blood and spirometry were measured twice, 6-15 years apart, in the same participants of three adult population-based discovery cohorts (n=2043). Associated DNAme markers (p EWAS signals were enriched for smoking-related DNAme. We replicated 57 lung function DNAme markers in adult, but not childhood samples, all previously associated with smoking. Markers not previously associated with smoking failed replication. cg05575921 (AHRR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor)) showed the statistically most significant association with cross-sectional lung function (FEV1/FVC: pdiscovery=3.96x10(-21) and pcombined=7.22x10(-50)). A score combining 10 DNAme markers previously reported to mediate the effect of smoking on lung function was associated with lung function (FEV1/FVC: p=2.65x10(-20)). Our results reveal that lung function-associated methylation signals in adults are predominantly smoking related, and possibly of clinical utility in identifying poor lung function and accelerated decline. Larger studies with more repeat time-points are needed to identify lung function DNAme in never-smokers and in children.
  • GBD 2017 Dis Injury Incidence Pr (2018)
    Background The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2017 (GBD 2017) includes a comprehensive assessment of incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) for 354 causes in 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2017. Previous GBD studies have shown how the decline of mortality rates from 1990 to 2016 has led to an increase in life expectancy, an ageing global population, and an expansion of the non-fatal burden of disease and injury. These studies have also shown how a substantial portion of the world's population experiences non-fatal health loss with considerable heterogeneity among different causes, locations, ages, and sexes. Ongoing objectives of the GBD study include increasing the level of estimation detail, improving analytical strategies, and increasing the amount of high-quality data. Methods We estimated incidence and prevalence for 354 diseases and injuries and 3484 sequelae. We used an updated and extensive body of literature studies, survey data, surveillance data, inpatient admission records, outpatient visit records, and health insurance claims, and additionally used results from cause of death models to inform estimates using a total of 68 781 data sources. Newly available clinical data from India, Iran, Japan, Jordan, Nepal, China, Brazil, Norway, and Italy were incorporated, as well as updated claims data from the USA and new claims data from Taiwan (province of China) and Singapore. We used DisMod-MR 2.1, a Bayesian meta-regression tool, as the main method of estimation, ensuring consistency between rates of incidence, prevalence, remission, and cause of death for each condition. YLDs were estimated as the product of a prevalence estimate and a disability weight for health states of each mutually exclusive sequela, adjusted for comorbidity. We updated the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a summary development indicator of income per capita, years of schooling, and total fertility rate. Additionally, we calculated differences between male and female YLDs to identify divergent trends across sexes. GBD 2017 complies with the Guidelines for Accurate and Transparent Health Estimates Reporting. Findings Globally, for females, the causes with the greatest age-standardised prevalence were oral disorders, headache disorders, and haemoglobinopathies and haemolytic anaemias in both 1990 and 2017. For males, the causes with the greatest age-standardised prevalence were oral disorders, headache disorders, and tuberculosis including latent tuberculosis infection in both 1990 and 2017. In terms of YLDs, low back pain, headache disorders, and dietary iron deficiency were the leading Level 3 causes of YLD counts in 1990, whereas low back pain, headache disorders, and depressive disorders were the leading causes in 2017 for both sexes combined. All-cause age-standardised YLD rates decreased by 39% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 3.1-4. 6) from 1990 to 2017; however, the all-age YLD rate increased by 7.2% (6.0-8.4) while the total sum of global YLDs increased from 562 million (421-723) to 853 million (642-1100). The increases for males and females were similar, with increases in all-age YLD rates of 7.9% (6 6-9. 2) for males and 6.5% (5.4-7.7) for females. We found significant differences between males and females in terms of age-standardised prevalence estimates for multiple causes. The causes with the greatest relative differences between sexes in 2017 included substance use disorders (3018 cases [95% UI 2782-3252] per 100 000 in males vs 1400 [1279-1524] per 100 000 in females), transport injuries (3322 [3082-3583] vs 2336 [2154-2535]), and self-hatin and interpersonal violence (3265 [2943-3630] vs 5643 [5057-6302]). Interpretation Global all-cause age-standardised YLD rates have improved only slightly over a period spanning nearly three decades. However, the magnitude of the non-fatal disease burden has expanded globally, with increasing numbers of people who have a wide spectrum of conditions. A subset of conditions has remained globally pervasive since 1990, whereas other conditions have displayed more dynamic trends, with different ages, sexes, and geographies across the globe experiencing varying burdens and trends of health loss. This study emphasises how global improvements in premature mortality for select conditions have led to older populations with complex and potentially expensive diseases, yet also highlights global achievements in certain domains of disease and injury. Copyright (C) 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Bajc, M.; Chen, Y.; Wang, J.; Li, X. Y.; Shen, W. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Huang, H.; Lindqvist, A.; He, X. Y. (2017)
    Introduction: Airway obstruction and possible concomitant pulmonary diseases in COPD cannot be identified conventionally with any single diagnostic tool. We aimed to diagnose and grade COPD severity and identify pulmonary comorbidities associated with COPD with ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/P SPECT) using Technegas as the functional ventilation imaging agent. Methods: 94 COPD patients (aged 43-86 years, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages I-IV) were examined with V/P SPECT and spirometry. Ventilation and perfusion defects were analyzed blindly according to the European guidelines. Penetration grade of Technegas in V SPECT measured the degree of obstructive small airways disease. Total preserved lung function and penetration grade of Technegas in V SPECT were assessed by V/P SPECT and compared to GOLD stages and spirometry. Results: Signs of small airway obstruction in the ventilation SPECT images were found in 92 patients. Emphysema was identified in 81 patients. Two patients had no signs of COPD, but both of them had a pulmonary embolism, and in one of them we also suspected a lung tumor. The penetration grade of Technegas in V SPECT and total preserved lung function correlated significantly to GOLD stages (r=0.63 and -0.60, respectively, P <0.0001). V/P SPECT identified pulmonary embolism in 30 patients (32%). A pattern typical for heart failure was present in 26 patients (28%). Parenchymal changes typical for pneumonia or lung tumor were present in several cases. Conclusion: V/P SPECT, using Technegas as the functional ventilation imaging agent, is a new tool to diagnose COPD and to grade its severity. Additionally, it revealed heterogeneity of COPD caused by pulmonary comorbidities. The characteristics of these comorbidities suggest their significant impact in clarifying symptoms, and also their influence on the prognosis.
  • Skaaby, Tea; Taylor, Amy E.; Jacobsen, Rikke K.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Thuesen, Betina H.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Larsen, Sofus C.; Zhou, Ang; Wong, Andrew; Gabrielsen, Maiken E.; Bjorngaard, Johan H.; Flexeder, Claudia; Mannisto, Satu; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Barry, Sarah J.; Mollehave, Line Tang; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Friedrich, Nele; Bonten, Tobias N.; Noordam, Raymond; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Taube, Christian; Jessen, Leon E.; McConnachie, Alex; Sattar, Naveed; Upton, Mark N.; McSharry, Charles; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Schulz, Holger; Strauch, Konstantin; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Grallert, Harald; Nohr, Ellen A.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Voelker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Voeizke, Henry; Power, Chris; Hypponen, Elina; Hansen, Torben; Jorgensen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Salomaa, Veikko; Grarup, Niels; Langhammer, Arnulf; Romundstad, Pal R.; Skorpen, Frank; Kaprio, Jaakko; Munafo, Marcus R.; Linneberg, Allan (2017)
    Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61, 0.76; P <0.001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.86; P <0.001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.09; P = 0.967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0.958, 95% CI: 0.920, 0.998; P = 0.041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.02; P = 0.117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11; P = 0.020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.
  • Kauppi, Paula; Kupiainen, Henna; Lindqvist, Ari; Haahtela, Tari; Laitinen, Tarja (2014)
  • Tomasovic, Ana; Kurrle, Nina; Wempe, Frank; De-Zolt, Siike; Scheibe, Susan; Koli, Katri; Serchinger, Martin; Schnuetgen, Frank; Sueruen, Duran; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Weissmann, Norbert; von Meichner, Harald (2017)
    Latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 4 (LTBP4) belongs to the fibrillin/LTBP family of proteins and plays an important role as a structural component of extracellular matrix (ECM) and local regulator of TGF beta signaling. We have previously reported that Ltbp4S knock out mice (Ltbp4S-/-) develop centrilobular emphysema reminiscent of late stage COPD, which could be partially rescued by inactivating the antioxidant protein Sestrin 2 (Sesn2). More recent studies showed that Sesn2 knock out mice upregulate Pdgfr beta-controlled alveolar maintenance programs that protect against cigarette smoke induced pulmonary emphysema. Based on this, we hypothesized that the emphysema of Ltbp4S-/- mice is primarily caused by defective Pdgfr beta signaling. Here we show that LTBP4 induces Pdgfr beta signaling by inhibiting the antioxidant Nr12/Keap1 pathway in a TGF beta-dependent manner. Overall, our data identified Ltbp4 as a major player in lung remodeling and injury repair. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Näsänen-Gilmore, Pieta; Sipola-Leppänen, Marika; Tikanmäki, Marjaana; Matinolli, Hanna-Maria; Eriksson, Johan G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Vääräsmäki, Marja; Hovi, Petteri; Kajantie, Eero (2018)
    Very preterm birth, before the gestational age (GA) of 32 weeks, increases the risk of obstructed airflow in adulthood. We examined whether all preterm births (GA= 37 weeks). Preterm birth was associated with poorer lung function. Mean differences between individuals born early preterm versus full-term were -0.23 standard deviation (SD) (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.40, -0.05)) for forced vital capacity z-score (zFVC), -0.44 SD (95% CI -0.64, -0.25) for forced expiratory volume z-score (zFEV1), and -0.29 SD (95% CI -0.47, -0.10) for zFEV1/FVC. For late preterm, mean differences with full-term controls were -0.02 SD (95% CI -0.17, 0.13), -0.12 SD (95% CI -0.29, 0.04) and -0.13 SD (95% CI -0.29, 0.02) for zFVC, zFEV1, and zFEV1/FVC, respectively. Examination of finer GA subgroups suggested an inverse non-linear association between lung function and GA, with the greatest impact on zFEV1 for those born extremely preterm. The subgroup means were GA= 37weeks): 0.02 SD. Corresponding means for zFEV1/FVC were -1.79, -0.44, -0.47, -0.48, -0.29, and -0.02. Adjustment for maternal pregnancy conditions and socioeconomic and lifestyle factors had no major impact on the relationship. Preterm birth is associated with airflow limitation in adult life. The association appears to be attributable predominantly to those born most immature, with only a modest decrease among those born preterm at later gestational ages.
  • Obeidat, Ma'en; Hao, Ke; Bosse, Yohan; Nickle, David C.; Nie, Yunlong; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Sandford, Andrew J.; Daley, Denise D.; Hogg, James C.; Elliott, W. Mark; Fishbane, Nick; Timens, Wim; Hysi, Pirro G.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wilson, James F.; Hui, Jennie; Rawal, Rajesh; Schulz, Holger; Stubbe, Beate; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zhao, Jing Hua; Jarvis, Deborah; Kahonen, Mika; Franceschini, Nora; North, Kari E.; Loth, Daan W.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Bartz, Traci M.; Wilk, Jemma B.; O'Connor, George T.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Tang, Wenbo; Wain, Louise V.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Strachan, David P.; Sin, Don D.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.; Hall, Ian P.; Pare, Peter D. (2015)
    Background Lung function measures reflect the physiological state of the lung, and are essential to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The SpiroMeta-CHARGE consortium undertook the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) so far (n=48 201) for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) in the general population. The lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) study mapped the genetic architecture of gene expression in lung tissue from 1111 individuals. We used a systems genetics approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with lung function that act as eQTLs and change the level of expression of their target genes in lung tissue; termed eSNPs. Methods The SpiroMeta-CHARGE GWAS results were integrated with lung eQTLs to map eSNPs and the genes and pathways underlying the associations in lung tissue. For comparison, a similar analysis was done in peripheral blood. The lung mRNA expression levels of the eSNP-regulated genes were tested for associations with lung function measures in 727 individuals. Additional analyses identified the pleiotropic effects of eSNPs from the published GWAS catalogue, and mapped enrichment in regulatory regions from the ENCODE project. Finally, the Connectivity Map database was used to identify potential therapeutics in silico that could reverse the COPD lung tissue gene signature. Findings SNPs associated with lung function measures were more likely to be eQTLs and vice versa. The integration mapped the specific genes underlying the GWAS signals in lung tissue. The eSNP-regulated genes were enriched for developmental and inflammatory pathways; by comparison, SNPs associated with lung function that were eQTLs in blood, but not in lung, were only involved in inflammatory pathways. Lung function eSNPs were enriched for regulatory elements and were over-represented among genes showing differential expression during fetal lung development. An mRNA gene expression signature for COPD was identified in lung tissue and compared with the Connectivity Map. This in-silico drug repurposing approach suggested several compounds that reverse the COPD gene expression signature, including a nicotine receptor antagonist. These findings represent novel therapeutic pathways for COPD. Interpretation The system genetics approach identified lung tissue genes driving the variation in lung function and susceptibility to COPD. The identification of these genes and the pathways in which they are enriched is essential to understand the pathophysiology of airway obstruction and to identify novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for COPD, including drugs that reverse the COPD gene signature in silico.
  • Andersen, Heidi; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Piirilä, Päivi; Sovijärvi, Anssi; Langhammer, Arnulf; Backman, Helena; Lundbäck, Bo; Rönmark, Eva; Lehtimäki, Lauri; Ilmarinen, Pinja (2021)
    Multimorbidity is an emerging public health priority. This study aims to assess the role of lifestyle and socioeconomic status in the prevalence of multimorbidity and chronic diseases by using two language groups that are part of the same genetic subgroup but differ by daily habits. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2016 with randomly selected population sample with 4173 responders (52.3%) aged 20-69 years in Western Finland. We included 3864 Finnish participants with Swedish (28.1%) or Finnish (71.9%) as a native language. We used a questionnaire to assess participants' chronic diseases and lifestyle. We determined multimorbidity as a disease count >= 2. Finnish speakers were more likely to have a diagnosis of COPD, heart failure, diabetes, reflux disease, chronic kidney failure, and painful conditions than Swedish speakers. The prevalence of multimorbidity was higher for Finnish speakers in the age group of 60-69 years (41.0% vs. 32.0%, p = 0.018) than Swedish speakers. A higher proportion of Finnish speakers smoked, were obese, inactive, and had lower socioeconomic status compared to Swedish speakers. All these factors, in addition to age and female sex, were significant risk factors for multimorbidity. Prevalence of multimorbidity was different in two language groups living in the same area and was associated with differences in lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical inactivity and obesity.
  • Chung, Sangwoon; Sundar, Isaac K.; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Kinnula, Vuokko L.; Bulger, Michael; Yao, Hongwei; Rahman, Irfan (2011)
  • Basnet, Syaron; Merikanto, Ilona; Lahti, Tuuli; Mannisto, Satu; Laatikainen, Tiina; Vartiainen, Erkki; Partonen, Timo (2016)
    The purpose of this study was to assess how seasonality is associated with some of the most common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the general Finnish population. The global seasonality score (GSS) was used to measure the magnitude of seasonality in 4689 participants, in addition to which they reported the extent to which the seasonal variations in mood and behavior were experienced as a problem. Regression models and the odds ratios were adopted to analyze the associations adjusted for a range of covariates. Seventy percent of the participants had seasonal variations in sleep duration, social activity, mood, or energy level, and forty percent those in weight and appetite. Angina pectoris and depression were significantly associated with seasonality throughout the analysis. Hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, other (than rheumatoid) joint diseases and other (than depressive) psychological illnesses were significantly associated with experiencing a problem due to the seasonal variations, with an increase in the GSS, and with seasonal affective disorder and its subsyndromal form. The co-occurrence of the seasonal variations in mood and behavior with certain common NCDs warrants future research to have insights into the etiology and potentially shared pathways and mechanisms of action. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.