Browsing by Subject "ORDERED RESTRICTION MAPS"

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  • Mukherjee, Kingshuk; Alipanahi, Bahar; Kahveci, Tamer; Salmela, Leena; Boucher, Christina (2019)
    Motivation: Optical maps are high-resolution restriction maps (Rmaps) that give a unique numeric representation to a genome. Used in concert with sequence reads, they provide a useful tool for genome assembly and for discovering structural variations and rearrangements. Although they have been a regular feature of modern genome assembly projects, optical maps have been mainly used in post-processing step and not in the genome assembly process itself. Several methods have been proposed for pairwise alignment of single molecule optical maps-called Rmaps, or for aligning optical maps to assembled reads. However, the problem of aligning an Rmap to a graph representing the sequence data of the same genome has not been studied before. Such an alignment provides a mapping between two sets of data: optical maps and sequence data which will facilitate the usage of optical maps in the sequence assembly step itself. Results: We define the problem of aligning an Rmap to a de Bruijn graph and present the first algorithm for solving this problem which is based on a seed-and-extend approach. We demonstrate that our method is capable of aligning 73% of Rmaps generated from the Escherichia coli genome to the de Bruijn graph constructed from short reads generated from the same genome. We validate the alignments and show that our method achieves an accuracy of 99.6%. We also show that our method scales to larger genomes. In particular, we show that 76% of Rmaps can be aligned to the de Bruijn graph in the case of human data.
  • Mukherjee, Kingshuk; Rossi, Massimiliano; Salmela, Leena; Boucher, Christina (2021)
    Genome wide optical maps are high resolution restriction maps that give a unique numeric representation to a genome. They are produced by assembling hundreds of thousands of single molecule optical maps, which are called Rmaps. Unfortunately, there are very few choices for assembling Rmap data. There exists only one publicly-available non-proprietary method for assembly and one proprietary software that is available via an executable. Furthermore, the publicly-available method, by Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006), follows the overlap-layout-consensus (OLC) paradigm, and therefore, is unable to scale for relatively large genomes. The algorithm behind the proprietary method, Bionano Genomics' Solve, is largely unknown. In this paper, we extend the definition of bi-labels in the paired de Bruijn graph to the context of optical mapping data, and present the first de Bruijn graph based method for Rmap assembly. We implement our approach, which we refer to as rmapper, and compare its performance against the assembler of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006) and Solve by Bionano Genomics on data from three genomes: E. coli, human, and climbing perch fish (Anabas Testudineus). Our method was able to successfully run on all three genomes. The method of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006) only successfully ran on E. coli. Moreover, on the human genome rmapper was at least 130 times faster than Bionano Solve, used five times less memory and produced the highest genome fraction with zero mis-assemblies. Our software, rmapper is written in C++ and is publicly available under GNU General Public License at .