Browsing by Subject "OUTCOMES"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 322
  • Böttiger, B. W.; Lockey, A.; Aickin, R.; Castren, M.; de Caen, A.; Escalante, R.; Kern, K. B.; Lim, S. H.; Nadkarni, V.; Neumar, R. W.; Nolan, J. P.; Stanton, D.; Wang, T. -L.; Perkins, G. D. (2018)
    "All citizens of the world can save a life". With these words, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is launching the first global initiative - World Restart a Heart (WRAH) - to increase public awareness and therefore the rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for victims of cardiac arrest. In most of the cases, it takes too long for the emergency services to arrive on scene after the victim's collapse. Thus, the most effective way to increase survival and favourable outcome in cardiac arrest by two-to fourfold is early CPR by lay bystanders and by "first responders". Lay bystander resuscitation rates, however, differ significantly across the world, ranging from 5 to 80%. If all countries could have high lay bystander resuscitation rates, this would help to save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. In order to achieve this goal, all seven ILCOR councils have agreed to participate in WRAH 2018. Besides schoolchildren education in CPR ("KIDS SAVE LIVES"), many other initiatives have already been developed in different parts of the world. ILCOR is keen for the WRAH initiative to be as inclusive as possible, and that it should happen every year on 16 October or as close to that day as possible. Besides recommending CPR training for children and adults, it is hoped that a unified global message will enable our policy makers to take action to address the inequalities in patient survival around the world.
  • Kozyrev, Danil; Thiarawat, Peeraphong; Rezai Jahromi, Behnam; Intarakhao, Patcharin; Choque-Velasquez, Joham; Hijaz, Ferzat; Teo, Mario K.; Hernesniemi, Juha (2017)
    Meticulous haemostasis is one of the most important factors during microneurosurgical resection of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Controlling major arterial feeders and draining veins with clips and bipolar coagulation are well-established techniques, while managing with bleeding from deep tiny vessels still proves to be challenging. This technical note describes a technique used by the senior author in AVM surgery for last 20 years in dealing with the issue highlighted. "Dirty coagulation" is a technique of bipolar coagulation of small feeders carried out together with a thin layer of brain tissue that surrounds these fragile vessels. The senior author uses this technique for achieving permanent haemostasis predominantly in large and/or deep-seated AVMs. To illustrate the efficacy of this technique, we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of Spetzler-Martin (SM) grade III-V AVMs resected by the senior author over the last 5 years (2010-2015). Thirty-five cases of AVM surgeries (14 SM grade III, 15 SM grade IV and 6 SM grade V) in this 5-year period were analysed. No postoperative intracranial haemorrhage was encountered as a result of bleeding from the deep feeders. Postoperative angiograms showed complete resection of all AVMs, except in two cases (SM grade V and grade III). "Dirty coagulation" provides an effective way to secure haemostasis from deep tiny feeders. This cost-effective method could be successfully used for achieving permanent haemostasis and thereby decreasing postoperative haemorrhage in AVM surgery.
  • Lonnrot, Maria; Lynch, Kristian; Larsson, Helena Elding; Lernmark, Ake; Rewers, Marian; Hagopian, William; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey; Hyoty, Heikki; TEDDY Study Grp; Knip, Mikael (2015)
    Background: Early childhood environmental exposures, possibly infections, may be responsible for triggering islet autoimmunity and progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) follows children with increased HLA-related genetic risk for future T1D. TEDDY asks parents to prospectively record the child's infections using a diary book. The present paper shows how these large amounts of partially structured data were reduced into quantitative data-sets and further categorized into system-specific infectious disease episodes. The numbers and frequencies of acute infections and infectious episodes are shown. Methods: Study subjects (n = 3463) included children who had attended study visits every three months from age 3 months to 4 years, without missing two or more consecutive visits during the follow-up. Parents recorded illnesses prospectively in a TEDDY Book at home. The data were entered into the study database during study visits using ICD-10 codes by a research nurse. TEDDY investigators grouped ICD-10 codes and fever reports into infectious disease entities and further arranged them into four main categories of infectious episodes: respiratory, gastrointestinal, other, and unknown febrile episodes. Incidence rate of infections was modeled as function of gender, HLA-DQ genetic risk group and study center using the Poisson regression. Results: A total of 113,884 ICD-10 code reports for infectious diseases recorded in the database were reduced to 71,578 infectious episodes, including 74.0% respiratory, 13.1% gastrointestinal, 5.7% other infectious episodes and 7.2% febrile episodes. Respiratory and gastrointestinal infectious episodes were more frequent during winter. Infectious episode rates peaked at 6 months and began declining after 18 months of age. The overall infectious episode rate was 5.2 episodes per person-year and varied significantly by country of residence, sex and HLA genotype. Conclusions: The data reduction and categorization process developed by TEDDY enables analysis of single infectious agents as well as larger arrays of infectious agents or clinical disease entities. The preliminary descriptive analyses of the incidence of infections among TEDDY participants younger than 4 years fits well with general knowledge of infectious disease epidemiology. This protocol can be used as a template in forthcoming time-dependent TEDDY analyses and in other epidemiological studies.
  • Jääskeläinen, Iiro H.; Hagberg, Lars; Schyman, Tommy; Järvinen, Asko (2018)
    Background: Management practices of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI) were compared between two areas with similar healthcare structure and low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance.Methods: The high affinity to public health-care in the Nordic countries enabled population-based approach used in this retrospective study. The study population (n=460) consisted of all adult residents from Helsinki (Finland) and Gothenburg (Sweden) treated in hospital due to cSSSI during 2008-2011.Results: The majority of patients in Helsinki (57%) visited more than one ward during their hospital stay while in Gothenburg the majority of patients (85%) were treated in one ward only. Background and disease characteristics were largely similar in both cities but patients in Helsinki were younger [mean(SD) 59(18) versus 63(19) years, p=.0117], and greater proportions had diabetes (50% versus 32%, p
  • MacKay, C.; Webster, F.; Venkataramanan, Natarajan S.; Bytautas, J.; Perruccio, A. V.; Wong, R.; Carlesso, L.; Davis, A. M. (2017)
    Objectives: Studies show limited improvement in the frequency of engaging in life activities after joint replacement. However, there is a paucity of research that has examined factors, including other life events, which influence engagement following total hip replacement (THR). This research sought to identify factors associated with engaging in life activities following THR. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted with 376 people who had a THR for osteoarthritis (OA). Data were collected pre-surgery and 1 year post-surgery. The primary outcome was change in frequency in engagement in life activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI): higher scores indicate higher frequency of engagement (range 0e80)). Analyses included multivariable regression. Factors considered included: positive/negative life events, a new comorbidity, another joint replacement and complications post-surgery. Results: Participants' mean age was 64 years; 46% were male. 68% of participants had at least one comorbidity pre-surgery; 36% reported at least one new comorbidity after surgery. The mean change in LLDI frequency was an increase of 6.29 (+/- 8.10). 36% reported one or more positive impact life events in the year following surgery; 63% reported one or more negative life events. The number of positive life events (beta=1.24; 95% CI: 0.49, 1.99) was significantly associated with change in LLDI frequency after adjusting for age, sex, education, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities pre-surgery, number of symptomatic joints and pre-surgery pain and function, LLDI limitations and depression. Conclusions: These findings highlight the significant influence of social factors and life circumstances on engagement in life activities following THR. (C) 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N.; Labopin, Myriam; Michallet, Mauricette; Craddock, Charles; Socie, Gerard; Volin, Liisa; Maertens, Johan A.; Crawley, Charles; Blaise, Didier; Ljungman, Per T.; Cornelissen, Jan; Russell, Nigel; Baron, Frederic; Gorin, Norbert; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2017)
    ABO incompatibility is commonly observed in stem cell transplantation and its impact in this setting has been extensively investigated. HLA-mismatched unrelated donors (MMURD) are often used as an alternative stem cell source but are associated with increased transplant related complications. Whether ABO incompatibility affects outcome in MMURD transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients is unknown. We evaluated 1,013 AML patients who underwent MMURD transplantation between 2005 and 2014. Engraftment rates were comparable between ABO matched and mismatched patients, as were relapse incidence [34%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 28-39; for ABO matched vs. 36%; 95% CI, 32-40; for ABO mismatched; P=.32], and nonrelapse mortality (28%; 95% CI, 23-33; for ABO matched vs. 25%; 95% CI, 21-29; for ABO mismatched; P=.2). Three year survival was 40% for ABO matched and 43% for ABO mismatched patients (P=.35), Leukemia free survival rates were also comparable between groups (37%; 95% CI, 32-43; for ABO matched vs. 38%; 95% CI, 33-42; for ABO mismatched; P=.87). Incidence of grade II-IV acute graft versus host disease was marginally lower in patients with major ABO mismatching (Hazard ratio of 0.7, 95% CI, 0.5-1; P=.049]. ABO incompatibility probably has no significant clinical implications in MMURD transplantation.
  • Wester, Tomas; Lilja, Helene Engstrand; Stenstrom, Pernilla; Pakarinen, Mikko (2017)
    Background. Serial transverse enteroplasty facilitates weaning from parenteral support in selected patients with short bowel syndrome, although repeated procedure is frequently required. Our aim was to evaluate the outcome of a series of patients after serial transverse enteroplasty and define predictors of repeated serial transverse enteroplasty and weaning off parenteral support. Methods. All children who underwent serial transverse enteroplasty at 4 Nordic pediatric surgery centers from 2004-2015 were included in this observational study. Data were collected from the patient records. The study was approved by the local ethics review boards. Results. Twenty-seven children with short bowel with initial median small bowel length of 26 cm (range, 10-100 cm) were included. Eleven patients had the ileocecal valve remaining. Serial transverse enteroplasty was performed at median age of 7.5 months (range, 0.9-224 months). Serial transverse enteroplasty made the small bowel 46% (0-233%) longer. Eleven patients (41 %) underwent a repeated serial transverse enteroplasty 12 months (1.0-72 months) later; 7 patients required additional operative procedures, but none were transplanted. At follow-up, 45.1 months (1.8-126 months) after the first serial transverse enteroplasty, 11 (41 %) patients needed parenteral support. The remaining 16 patients had been weaned off parenteral support. One patient had died. Absence of the ileocecal valve was the only factor, which predicted the need for a repeated serial transverse enteroplasty (odds ratio 16.7, 95 % confidence interval, 1.7-164.8, P =.007). No factor was identified predicting need for parenteral support at follow-up. Conclusion. A majority of children with short bowel syndrome can be weaned from parenteral support after serial transverse enteroplasty. The absence of the ileocecal valve predicts the need for a repeated serial transverse enteroplasty, which was required by 40% of the patients.
  • Azoulay, Elie; Pickkers, Peter; Soares, Marcio; Perner, Anders; Rello, Jordi; Bauer, Philippe R.; van de Louw, Andry; Hemelaar, Pleun; Lemiale, Virginie; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Loeches, Ignacio Martin; Meyhoff, Tine Sylvest; Salluh, Jorge; Schellongowski, Peter; Rusinova, Katerina; Terzi, Nicolas; Mehta, Sangeeta; Antonelli, Massimo; Kouatchet, Achille; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Valkonen, Miia; Landburg, Precious Pearl; Bruneel, Fabrice; Bukan, Ramin Brandt; Pene, Frederic; Metaxa, Victoria; Moreau, Anne Sophie; Souppart, Virginie; Burghi, Gaston; Girault, Christophe; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Montini, Luca; Barbier, Francois; Nielsen, Lene B.; Gaborit, Benjamin; Mokart, Djamel; Chevret, Sylvie; Efraim Investigators; Nine-I Study Grp (2017)
    In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational prospective cohort study in 16 countries (68 centers). A total of 1611 patients were enrolled (hematological malignancies 51.9%, solid tumors 35.2%, systemic diseases 17.3%, and solid organ transplantation 8.8%). The main ARF etiologies were bacterial (29.5%), viral (15.4%), and fungal infections (14.7%), or undetermined (13.2%). On admission, 915 (56.8%) patients were not intubated. They received standard oxygen (N = 496, 53.9%), high-flow oxygen (HFNC, N = 187, 20.3%), noninvasive ventilation (NIV, N = 153, 17.2%), and NIV + HFNC (N = 79, 8.6%). Factors associated with IMV included age (hazard ratio = 0.92/year, 95% CI 0.86-0.99), day-1 SOFA (1.09/point, 1.06-1.13), day-1 PaO2/FiO(2) (1.47, 1.05-2.07), ARF etiology (Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (2.11, 1.42-3.14), invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (1.85, 1.21-2.85), and undetermined cause (1.46, 1.09-1.98). After propensity score matching, HFNC, but not NIV, had an effect on IMV rate (HR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.59-1.00, p = 0.05). ICU, hospital, and day-90 mortality rates were 32.4, 44.1, and 56.4%, respectively. Factors independently associated with hospital mortality included age (odds ratio = 1.18/year, 1.09-1.27), direct admission to the ICU (0.69, 0.54-0.87), day-1 SOFA excluding respiratory score (1.12/point, 1.08-1.16), PaO2/FiO(2) <100 (1.60, 1.03-2.48), and undetermined ARF etiology (1.43, 1.04-1.97). Initial oxygenation strategy did not affect mortality; however, IMV was associated with mortality, the odds ratio depending on IMV conditions: NIV + HFNC failure (2.31, 1.09-4.91), first-line IMV (2.55, 1.94-3.29), NIV failure (3.65, 2.05-6.53), standard oxygen failure (4.16, 2.91-5.93), and HFNC failure (5.54, 3.27-9.38). HFNC has an effect on intubation but not on mortality rates. Failure to identify ARF etiology is associated with higher rates of both intubation and mortality. This suggests that in addition to selecting the appropriate oxygenation device, clinicians should strive to identify the etiology of ARF.
  • Petaja, Liisa; Vaara, Suvi; Liuhanen, Sasu; Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili; Mildh, Leena; Nisula, Sara; Korhonen, Anna-Maija; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Salmenpera, Markku; Pettila, Ville (2017)
    Objectives: Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently after cardiac surgery and is associated with increased mortality. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria for diagnosing AKI include creatinine and urine output values. However, the value of the latter is debated. The authors aimed to evaluate the incidence of AKI after cardiac surgery and the independent association of KDIGO criteria, especially the urine output criterion, and 2.5-year mortality. Design: Prospective, observational, cohort study. Setting: Single-center study in a university hospital. Participants: The study comprised 638 cardiac surgical patients from September 1, 2011, to June 20, 2012. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Hourly urine output, daily plasma creatinine, risk factors for AKI, and variables for EuroSCORE II were recorded. AKI occurred in 183 (28.7%) patients. Patients with AKI diagnosed using only urine output had higher 2.5-year mortality than did patients without AKI (9/53 [17.0%] v 23/455 [5.1%], p = 0.001). AKI was associated with mortality (hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 3.3 [1.8-6.1] for KDIGO I; 5.8 [2.7-12.1] for KDIGO 2; and 7.9 [3.5-17.6]) for KDIGO 3. KDIGO stages and AKI diagnosed using urine output were associated with mortality even after adjusting for mortality risk assessed using EuroSCORE II and risk factors for AKI. Conclusions: AKI diagnosed using only the urine output criterion without fulfilling the creatinine criterion and all stages of AKI were associated with long-term mortality. Preoperatively assessed mortality risk using EuroSCORE II did not predict this AKI-associated mortality. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Blaser, Cornelia; Klein, Matthias; Grandgirard, Denis; Wittwer, Matthias; Peltola, Heikki; Weigand, Michael; Koedel, Uwe; Leib, Stephen L. (2010)
  • Raaska, Hanna; Elovainio, Marko; Sinkkonen, Jari; Stolt, Suvi; Jalonen, Iina; Matomaki, Jaakko; Makipaa, Sanna; Lapinleimu, Helena (2013)
  • Vehkalahti, M. M.; Palotie, U.; Valaste, Maria (2020)
    Aim To evaluate age-specific aspects and changes in volume and content of endodontic treatment for adults visiting private dentists in Finland in 2012 and 2017. Methodology This study utilized register-based data of private dental care. The observation unit of the aggregated macro-level data was age group, with 5-year age groups from 20 to 24 years onwards and the oldest group combining all patients aged 90 years and over. Data from years 2012 and 2017 included all the oral health care of 2.04 million patients receiving reimbursement for treatment by private dentists; a total of 183 932 patients received at least one endodontic treatment and were analysed. The number of teeth receiving endodontic treatment was counted separately as pulp cappings, pulpotomies and root canal fillings according to number of canals filled per tooth. Statistical associations were assessed as correlation coefficients. Results The mean age of endodontic patients was 53.6 years in 2012 and 55.9 years in 2017. In both years, 38% were aged from 50 to 64 years. In 2012, 9.9%, and in 2017, 8.0% of patients received at least one endodontic treatment; the older the patients, the fewer received endodontic treatment (r = -0.9). From 2012 to 2017, numbers of all patients and treatments decreased, endodontic patients and treatments even more notably, and in all age groups. Per thousand patients in 2017, 62.1 teeth received root canal treatment and 14.9 pulp capping. Pulp capping comprised 19.2%, pulpotomies 0.8% and root canal fillings 80.0% of teeth receiving endodontic treatment. Of root filled teeth, 45.1% received filling in one canal, 17.0% in two and 37.9% in three or more canals, multi-canal options being less frequent in older patients (r = -0.94). Conclusions Endodontic treatment, received by 9% of adult patients visiting private dentists in Finland, was strongly age-dependent, showing a decreasing trend with age and time.
  • Kasenda, Benjamin; von Elm, Erik; You, John J.; Bluemle, Anette; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J.; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K.; Tikkinen, Kari A. O.; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M.; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A.; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Lamontagne, Francois; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Raatz, Heike; Moja, Lorenzo; Ebrahim, Shanil; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; Vandvik, Per O.; Johnston, Bradley C.; Walter, Martin A.; Burnand, Bernard; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Hemkens, Lars G.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Briel, Matthias (2016)
    Background Little is known about publication agreements between industry and academic investigators in trial protocols and the consistency of these agreements with corresponding statements in publications. We aimed to investigate (i) the existence and types of publication agreements in trial protocols, (ii) the completeness and consistency of the reporting of these agreements in subsequent publications, and (iii) the frequency of co-authorship by industry employees. Methods and Findings We used a retrospective cohort of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) based on archived protocols approved by six research ethics committees between 13 January 2000 and 25 November 2003. Only RCTs with industry involvement were eligible. We investigated the documentation of publication agreements in RCT protocols and statements in corresponding journal publications. Of 647 eligible RCT protocols, 456 (70.5%) mentioned an agreement regarding publication of results. Of these 456, 393 (86.2%) documented an industry partner's right to disapprove or at least review proposed manuscripts; 39 (8.6%) agreements were without constraints of publication. The remaining 24 (5.3%) protocols referred to separate agreement documents not accessible to us. Of those 432 protocols with an accessible publication agreement, 268 (62.0%) trials were published. Most agreements documented in the protocol were not reported in the subsequent publication (197/268 [73.5%]). Of 71 agreements reported in publications, 52 (73.2%) were concordant with those documented in the protocol. In 14 of 37 (37.8%) publications in which statements suggested unrestricted publication rights, at least one co-author was an industry employee. In 25 protocol-publication pairs, author statements in publications suggested no constraints, but 18 corresponding protocols documented restricting agreements. Conclusions Publication agreements constraining academic authors' independence are common. Journal articles seldom report on publication agreements, and, if they do, statements can be discrepant with the trial protocol.
  • Baron, Frederic; Galimard, Jacques-Emmanue; Labopin, Myriam; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Niittyvuopio, Riitta; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Griskevicius, Laimonas; Wu, Depei; Forcade, Edouard; Richard, Carlos; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Helbig, Grzegorz; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2020)
    We compared severe graft-versus-host-disease GyHD) free and relapse-free survival and other transplantation outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients given bone marrow (BM) without and-thymocyte globulin (ATG) versus peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) with ATG after myeloablative conditioning. In the cohort of patients receiving grafts from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donor, patients given PBSC with ATG (n=1,021) and those given BM without ATG (n=1,633) presented comparable severe GvHD-free relapse-free survival (GRSF)(hazard ratio [HR]=0.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8-1.1, P=0.5) and overall survival (HR=1.0, 95% CI: 0.8-1.2, P=0.8). They had however, a lower incidence of chronic GvHD (cGvHD) (HR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01). In the cohort of patients receiving grafts from HLA-matched unrelated donor , patients given PBSC with ATG (n=2,318) had better severe GvHD-free and relapse-free survival (GRFS) than those given BM without ATG (n=303) (HR=0.8, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.001). They also had a lower incidence of cGvHD (HR=0.6, 95% CI: 0.5-0.8, P=0.0006) and better overall survival (HR=0.8, 95% CI: 0.6-1.0, P=0.04). In summary, these data suggest that PBSC with ATG results in comparable (in the case of sibling donor) or significantly better (in the case of unrelated donor) severe GRFS than BM without ATG in patients with AML in complete remission receiving grafts after myeloablative conditioning.
  • Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Dietrich, Sascha; Blok, Henric-Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Ayuk, Francis; Finke, Juergen; Tischer, Johanna; Mayer, Jiri; Koc, Yener; Sora, Federica; Passweg, Jakob; Byrne, Jenny L.; Jindra, Pavel; Veelken, Joan Hendrik; Socie, Gerard; Maertens, Johan; Schaap, Nicolaas; Stadler, Michael; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Tholouli, Eleni; Arat, Mutlu; Rocha, Vanderson; Ljungman, Per; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Chalandon, Yves (2019)
    The prognosis of patients with blast crisis (BC) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is still dismal. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment option, but data on transplant outcomes are scarce. We therefore conducted a retrospective, registry-based study of adult patients allografted for BC CML, focusing on patients with active disease at transplant and pretransplant prognostic factors. One hundred seventy patients allografted for BC CML after tyrosine kinase inhibitor pretreatment between 2004 and 2016 were analyzed. Before transplant, 95 patients were in remission, whereas 75 patients had active BC. In multivariable analysis of the entire cohort, active BC at transplant was the strongest factor associated with decreased overall survival (hazrd ratio, 1.87; P = .010) and shorter leukemia-free survival (LFS; hazard ratio, 1.69; P= .017). For patients with BC in remission at transplant, advanced age (>= 45 years), lower performance status (12 months), myeloablative conditioning, and unrelated donor (UD) transplant were risk factors for inferior survival. In patients with active BC, only UD transplant was significantly associated with prolonged LFS and trended toward improved overall survival. In summary, survival of patients allografted for BC CML was strongly dependent on pretransplant remission status. In patients with remission of BC, conventional prognostic factors remained the major determinants of outcome, whereas in those with active BC at transplant, UD transplant was associated with prolonged LFS in our study. (C) 2019 American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Kataja, Anu; Tarvasmäki, Tuukka; Lassus, Johan; Kober, Lars; Sionis, Alessandro; Spinar, Jindrich; Parissis, John; Carubelli, Valentina; Cardoso, Jose; Banaszewski, Marek; Marino, Rossella; Nieminen, Markku S.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Harjola, Veli-Pekka (2018)
    Background: Altered mental status is among the signs of hypoperfusion in cardiogenic shock, the most severe form of acute heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of altered mental status, to identify factors associating with it, and to assess the prognostic significance of altered mental status in cardiogenic shock. Methods: Mental status was assessed at presentation of shock in 215 adult cardiogenic shock patients in a multinational, prospective, observational study. Clinical picture, biochemical variables, and short-term mortality were compared between patients presenting with altered and normal mental status. Results: Altered mental status was detected in 147 (68%) patients, whereas 68 (32%) patients had normal mental status. Patients with altered mental status were older (68 vs. 64 years, p=0.04) and more likely to have an acute coronary syndrome than those with normal mental status (85% vs. 74%, p=0.04). Altered mental status was associated with lower systolic blood pressure (76 vs. 80 mmHg, p=0.03) and lower arterial pH (7.27 vs. 7.35, p Conclusions: Altered mental status is a common clinical sign of systemic hypoperfusion in cardiogenic shock and is associated with poor outcome. It is also associated with several biochemical findings that reflect inadequate tissue perfusion, of which low arterial pH is independently associated with altered mental status.
  • Harju, Vilhelmiina; Koskinen, Antti; Pehkonen, Leila (2019)
    Background: The importance of digital technologies for enhancing learning in formal education settings has been widely acknowledged. In the light of this expectation, it is important to investigate the effects of these technologies on students' learning and development. Purpose: This study explores longitudinal empirical research on digital learning in the context of primary and secondary education. By focusing on a small selection of the peer-reviewed literature, the aim is to examine the kinds of longitudinal study published on this topic during the period 2012-2017 and, thorough categorisation, to bring together insights about the reported influences of digital technology use on students' learning. Design and methods: The databases searched for the purposes of this review were Scopus and Web of Science. Of 1,989 articles, 13 were finally included in the review. Using qualitative content analysis, these were analysed, coded and categorised. Results: The reviewed studies were found to have approached digital learning in different ways: they varied, for example, in terms of research methods and design and the digital technologies used. The studies addressed different aspects of learning, which we assigned to six categories: affection, attitude, and motivation; subject-specific knowledge and skills; transversal skills; learning experience; elements of the learning environment; and identity. We identified both positive and negative influences of technology on learning. Conclusions: This review offers a snapshot of the variety of research in this fast-moving area. The studies we explored were found to approach digital learning from several different perspectives, and no straightforward conclusions can be drawn about the influences of digital technology use on students' learning. We conclude that further longitudinal studies of digital learning are needed, and this study assists by highlighting gaps in the existing literature.
  • Tolvi, Morag; Mattila, Kimmo; Haukka, Jari; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Lehtonen, Lasse (2020)
    Background: The weekend effect, the phenomenon of patients admitted at the weekend having a higher mortality risk, has been widely investigated and documented in both elective and emergency patients. Research on the issue is scarce in Europe, with the exception of the United Kingdom. We examined the situation in Helsinki University Hospital over a 14-year period from a specialty-specific approach. Materials and methods: We collected the data for all patient visits for 2000-2013, selecting patients with in-hospital care in the university hospital and extracting patients that died during their hospital stay or within 30 days of discharge. These patients were categorized according to urgency of care and specialty. Results: A total of 1,542,230 in-patients (853,268 emergency patients) met the study criteria, with 47,122 deaths in-hospital or within 30 days of discharge. Of 12 specialties, we found a statistically significant weekend effect for in-hospital mortality in 7 specialties (emergency admissions) and 4 specialties (elective admissions); for 30-day post-discharge mortality in 1 specialty (emergency admissions) and 2 specialties (elective admissions). Surgery, internal medicine, neurology, and gynecology and obstetrics were most sensitive to the weekend effect. Conclusions: The study confirms a weekend effect for both elective and emergency admissions in most specialties. Reducing the number of weekend elective procedures may be necessary. More disease-specific research is needed to find the diagnoses most susceptible. (C) 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Spillerova, K.; Settembre, N.; Biancari, F.; Albäck, A.; Venermo, M. (2017)
    Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of angiosome targeted (direct) revascularisation according to revascularisation method in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods: This retrospective study cohort comprised 545 diabetic patients with critical limb ischaemia and tissue loss (Rutherford 5, 6). All patients underwent infrapopliteal endovascular (PTA) or open surgical revascularisation between January 2008 and December 2013. Differences in the outcome after direct revascularisation, bypass surgery, and PTA were investigated by means of Cox proportional hazards analysis. The endpoints were wound healing, leg salvage, and amputation free survival. Results: Overall, 60.3% of the ischaemic wounds healed during 1 year of follow-up. The highest wound healing rate was achieved after direct bypass (77%) and the worst after indirect PTA (52%). The Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that the number of affected angiosomes = 10 mg/dL (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.45-2.90), atrial fibrillation (HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.26), and number of affected angiosomes >3 (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.24-2.46) were significantly associated with poor leg salvage. Direct PTA was associated with a lower rate of major amputation compared with indirect PTA (HR 0.57 95% CI 0.37-0.89). Conclusion: In diabetics, indirect endovascular revascularisation leads to significantly worse wound healing and leg salvage rates compared with direct revascularisation. Therefore, endovascular procedures should be targeted according to the angiosome concept. In bypass surgery, however, the concept is of less value and the artery with the best runoff should be selected as the outflow artery. (C) 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.