Browsing by Subject "OUTPATIENTS"

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  • FinnDiane Study Grp; Ahola, Aila J.; Harjutsalo, Valma; Forsblom, Carol; Pouwer, Francois; Groop, Per-Henrik (2021)
    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between depression and diabetic nephropathy progression in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data from 3,730 participants without end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at baseline, participating in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study, were included. Depression was assessed in three ways. Depression diagnoses were obtained from the Finnish Care Register for Health Care. Antidepressant agent purchase data were obtained from the Drug Prescription Register. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Based on their urinary albumin excretion rate (AER), participants were classified as those with normal AER, microalbuminuria, and macroalbuminuria. Progression from normal AER to microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, or ESRD; from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria or ESRD; or from macroalbuminuria to ESRD, during the follow-up period, was investigated. RESULTS Over a mean follow-up period of 9.6 years, renal status deteriorated in 18.4% of the participants. Diagnosed depression and antidepressant purchases before baseline were associated with 53% and 32% increased risk of diabetic nephropathy progression, respectively. Diagnosed depression assessed during follow-up remained associated with increased risk of disease progression (32%). BDI-derived symptoms of depression showed no association with the progression, but the total number of antidepressant purchases modestly reduced the risk (hazard ratio 0.989 [95% CI 0.982-0.997]), P = 0.008). With the sample divided based on median age, the observations followed those seen in the whole group. However, symptoms of depression additionally predicted progression in those age
  • Ämmälä, Antti-Jussi; Urrila, Anna-Sofia; Lahtinen, Aleksandra; Santangeli, Olena; Hakkarainen, Antti; Kantojärvi, Katri; Castaneda, Anu E.; Lundbom, Nina; Marttunen, Mauri; Paunio, Tiina (2019)
    Objectives: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that sleep and depression have independent effects on brain development and plasticity in adolescents, and that these changes are reflected in changes in the epigenome. Methods: Participants were 17 medication-free adolescent boys (age 16.05 +/- 0.80 years, mean +/- standard deviation (SD); eight cases with depression and sleep symptoms, nine healthy controls). Sleep was assessed by polysomnography recordings and the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS) and Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS). Participants underwent a clinical evaluation. DNA methylation of blood leukocytes was measured by Illumina 450K array, and Ingenuity Pathway analysis was applied to identify the most significant pathways with differentially methylated positions (DMPs). Secondary analysis of the identified loci included linear correlations between methylation and the subjectively rated scales of sleep, depression and sleep microarchitecture. Results: Due to small sample size, we found no genome-wide significant differences in methylation between cases and controls. However, pathway analysis identified the synaptic long-term depression (LTD) canonical pathway (p = 0.00045) when the best 500 DMPs from the original case-control design were included. A flattened dissipation of slow wave sleep, tiredness and depression severity values correlated with five of 10 sites from the LTD pathway (IGF1R, PLAG16, PLA2R1, PPP2C5 and ERK12) in the secondary analysis when the case-control status was controlled for. Conclusion: Among adolescents, depressive disorder with sleep symptoms is associated with a distinctive epigenetic pattern of DNA methylation in blood leukocytes. The enrichment of DMPs on genes related to synaptic LTD emphasizes the role of sleep in synaptic plasticity and the widespread physiological consequences of disturbed sleep. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Teramura-Gronblad, Mariko; Raivio, Minna; Savikko, Niina; Muurinen, Seija; Soini, Helena; Suominen, Merja; Pitkala, Kaisu (2016)
    Objective: This study aims to assess potentially severe class D drug-drug interactions (DDDIs) in residents 65 years or older in assisted living facilities with the use of a Swedish and Finnish drug-drug interaction database (SFINX). Design: A cross-sectional study of residents in assisted living facilities in Helsinki, Finland. Setting: A total of 1327 residents were assessed in this study. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and DDDIs were coded according to the SFINX. Main outcome measures: Prevalence of DDDIs, associated factors and 3-year mortality among residents. Results: Of the participants (mean age was 82.7 years, 78.3% were females), 5.9% (N=78) are at risk for DDDIs, with a total of 86 interactions. Participants with DDDIs had been prescribed a higher number of drugs (10.8 (SD 3.8) vs. 7.9 (SD 3.7), p Conclusions: Of the residents in assisted living, 5.9% were exposed to DDDIs associated with the use of a higher number of drugs. Physicians should be trained to find safer alternatives to drugs associated with DDDIs.
  • Adolescent Depression Study Grp; Urrila, Anna S.; Kiviruusu, Olli; Haravuori, Henna; Karlsson, Linnea; Viertiö, Satu; Suvisaari, Jaana; Marttunen, Mauri (2020)
    Sleep abnormalities in major depressive disorder (MDD) have been suggested to represent a vulnerability trait, which might predispose the individual to long-term psychiatric morbidity. In this study, we sought to assess whether the presence of sleep symptoms among adolescents with MDD is associated with poorer long-term outcome in young adulthood during naturalistic follow-up. Adolescent outpatients diagnosed with MDD (n=166; age 13-19 years, 17.5% boys) were followed up during 8 years in naturalistic settings. N=112 adolescents (16.1% boys) completed the 8-year assessment. Sleep symptoms and psychosocial functioning were assessed with structured clinical interviews, and depressive and anxiety symptoms with questionnaires. The severity of sleep symptoms at baseline was not associated with worse outcome at 8 years in terms of any of the outcome measures tested. In particular, the presence of a disturbed sleep-wake rhythm at baseline was associated with a more favourable outcome at 8 years: less depression and anxiety symptoms and higher level of psychosocial functioning. The presence of sleep symptoms in young adulthood was associated with the presence of current depression and anxiety symptoms and poorer psychosocial functioning. The presence of sleep symptoms at follow-up seems to be state-dependent: they are observed in conjunction with other psychiatric symptoms. Contrary to our hypothesis, our results suggest that sleep complaints among adolescents with MDD do not lead to poorer long-term clinical outcome in young adulthood. The link between sleep-wake rhythm disturbance and better long-term outcome needs to be confirmed and examined in detail in further studies, but here we speculate about possible explanations.
  • Garcia-Velázquez, Regina; Komulainen, Kaisla; Gluschkoff, Kia; Airaksinen, Jaakko; Määttänen, Ilmari; Rosenström, Tom Henrik; Jokela, Markus (2021)
    Objective: Individuals with low socioeconomic status have higher rates of depression, but it is unknown whether the socioeconomically disadvantaged also have more disabling depressive symptoms. We examined (1) the associations of three indicators of socioeconomic status with depression-related severe role impairment, and (2) whether socioeconomic factors moderate the association between individual depression symptoms and depression-related severe role impairment. Methods: We used data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Depressive symptoms, role impairment and socioeconomic indicators (poverty, participation in workforce, educational attainment) were self-reported by participants. The analytic sample consisted of participants who screened positive for a depressive episode during past 12 months (n = 32 661). We used survey-weighted logistic models to examine the associations of depressive symptoms with severe role impairment and the modifying effects of socioeconomic indicators. Results: The association between depression symptom count and severe role impairment was stronger among those not in workforce (OR = 1.12[1.02-1.23]). The association between specific depression symptoms and severe role impairment was stronger for conditions of poverty (fatigue, OR = 2.97 [1.54-5.73]; and anhedonia, OR = 1.93[1.13-3.30]), workforce non-participation (inability to concentrate/indecisiveness, OR = 1.54 [1.12-2.12]), and lower educational attainment (anhedonia, OR = 0.77 [0.59-0.99]). Feelings of worthlessness was the only symptom with independent associations for all socioeconomic groups (adjusted OR = 1.91 [1.35-2.70]). Conclusion: Depression was more frequent and also more disabling for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups, especially when assessed with workforce participation. Additionally, some specific symptoms showed socioeconomic differences. Our findings highlight the need to prioritize population groups with more severe impairment associated with depressive symptoms.
  • Garcia-Velázquez, Regina; Komulainen, Kaisla; Gluschkoff, Kia; Airaksinen, Jaakko; Määttänen, Ilmari; Rosenström, Tom Henrik; Jokela, Markus (2021)
    Objective: Individuals with low socioeconomic status have higher rates of depression, but it is unknown whether the socioeconomically disadvantaged also have more disabling depressive symptoms. We examined (1) the associations of three indicators of socioeconomic status with depression-related severe role impairment, and (2) whether socioeconomic factors moderate the association between individual depression symptoms and depression-related severe role impairment. Methods: We used data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Depressive symptoms, role impairment and socioeconomic indicators (poverty, participation in workforce, educational attainment) were self-reported by participants. The analytic sample consisted of participants who screened positive for a depressive episode during past 12 months (n = 32 661). We used survey-weighted logistic models to examine the associations of depressive symptoms with severe role impairment and the modifying effects of socioeconomic indicators. Results: The association between depression symptom count and severe role impairment was stronger among those not in workforce (OR = 1.12[1.02-1.23]). The association between specific depression symptoms and severe role impairment was stronger for conditions of poverty (fatigue, OR = 2.97 [1.54-5.73]; and anhedonia, OR = 1.93[1.13-3.30]), workforce non-participation (inability to concentrate/indecisiveness, OR = 1.54 [1.12-2.12]), and lower educational attainment (anhedonia, OR = 0.77 [0.59-0.99]). Feelings of worthlessness was the only symptom with independent associations for all socioeconomic groups (adjusted OR = 1.91 [1.35-2.70]). Conclusion: Depression was more frequent and also more disabling for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups, especially when assessed with workforce participation. Additionally, some specific symptoms showed socioeconomic differences. Our findings highlight the need to prioritize population groups with more severe impairment associated with depressive symptoms.