Browsing by Subject "OVARIAN-CANCER"

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  • Havunen, Riikka; Santos, Joao M.; Sorsa, Suvi; Rantapero, Tommi; Lumen, Dave; Siurala, Mikko; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Tähtinen, Siri; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    Cancer treatment with local administration of armed oncolytic viruses could potentially induce systemic antitumor effects, or the abscopal effect, as they self-amplify in tumors, induce danger signaling, and promote tumor-associated antigen presentation. In this study, oncolytic adenovirus coding for human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 (also known as [a.k.a.] TILT-123) provoked antitumor efficacy in tumors that were injected with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 and those that were left non-injected in the same animal. Importantly, the virus was able to travel to distant tumors. To dissect the effects of oncolysis and cytokines, we studied replication-incompetent viruses in mice. Systemic antitumor effects were similar in both models, highlighting the importance of the arming device. The cytokines induced positive changes in immune cell infiltrates and induced the expression of several immune-reaction-related genes in tumors. In addition, Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 was able to increase homing of adoptively transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes into both injected and non-injected tumors, possibly mediated through chemokine expression. In summary, local treatment with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 resulted in systemic antitumor efficacy by inducing immune cell infiltration and trafficking into both treated and untreated tumors. Moreover, the oncolytic adenovirus platform had superior systemic effects over replication-deficient vector through spreading into distant tumors.
  • Zafar, Sadia; Quixabeira, Dafne Carolina Alves; Kudling, Tatiana Viktorovna; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Santos, Joao Manuel; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Zhao, Fang; Aronen, Pasi; Heiniö, Camilla; Havunen, Riikka; Sorsa, Suvi; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2021)
    Oncolytic adenoviruses are promising cancer therapeutic agents. Clinical data have shown adenoviruses' ability to transduce tumors after systemic delivery in human cancer patients, despite antibodies. In the present work, we have focused on the interaction of a chimeric adenovirus Ad5/3 with human lymphocytes and human erythrocytes. Ad5/3 binding with human lymphocytes and erythrocytes was observed to occur in a reversible manner, which allowed viral transduction of tumors, and oncolytic potency of Ad5/3 in vitro and in vivo,with or without neutralizing antibodies. Immunodeficient mice bearing xenograft tumors showed enhanced tumor transduction following systemic administration, when Ad5/3 virus was bound to lymphocytes or erythrocytes (P <0.05). In conclusion, our findings reveal that chimeric Ad5/3 adenovirus reaches non-injected tumors in the presence of neutralizing antibodies: it occurs through reversible binding to lymphocytes and erythrocytes.
  • Garofalo, M.; Saari, H.; Somersalo, P.; Crescenti, D.; Kuryk, L.; Aksela, L.; Capasso, C.; Madetoja, M.; Koskinen, K.; Oksanen, T.; Mäkitie, A.; Jalasvuori, M.; Cerullo, V.; Ciana, P.; Yliperttula, M. (2018)
    Standard of care for cancer is commonly a combination of surgery with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, in some advanced cancer patients this approach might still remaininefficient and may cause many side effects, including severe complications and even death. Oncolytic viruses exhibit different anti-cancer mechanisms compared with conventional therapies, allowing the possibility for improved effect in cancer therapy. Chemotherapeutics combined with oncolytic viruses exhibit stronger cytotoxic responses and oncolysis. Here, we have investigated the systemic delivery of the oncolytic adenovirus and paclitaxel encapsulated in extracellular vesicles (EV) formulation that, in vitro, significantly increased the transduction ratio and the infectious titer when compared with the virus and paclitaxel alone. We demonstrated that the obtained EV formulation reduced the in vivo tumor growth in animal xenograft model of human lung cancer. Indeed, we found that combined treatment of oncolytic adenovirus and paclitaxel encapsulated in EV has enhanced anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo in lung cancer models. Transcriptomic comparison carried out on the explanted xenografts from the different treatment groups revealed that only 5.3% of the differentially expressed genes were overlapping indicating that a de novo genetic program is triggered by the presence of the encapsulated paclitaxel: this novel genetic program might be responsible of the observed enhanced antitumor effect. Our work provides a promising approach combining anticancer drugs and viral therapies by intravenous EV delivery as a strategy for the lung cancer treatment.
  • Laury, Anna Ray; Blom, Sami; Ropponen, Tuomas; Virtanen, Anni; Carpen, Olli Mikael (2021)
    High-grade extrauterine serous carcinoma (HGSC) is an aggressive tumor with high rates of recurrence, frequent chemotherapy resistance, and overall 5-year survival of less than 50%. Beyond determining and confirming the diagnosis itself, pathologist review of histologic slides provides no prognostic or predictive information, which is in sharp contrast to almost all other carcinoma types. Deep-learning based image analysis has recently been able to predict outcome and/or identify morphology-based representations of underlying molecular alterations in other tumor types, such as colorectal carcinoma, lung carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and melanoma. Using a carefully stratified HGSC patient cohort consisting of women (n = 30) with similar presentations who experienced very different treatment responses (platinum free intervals of either = 18 months), we used whole slide images (WSI, n = 205) to train a convolutional neural network. The neural network was trained, in three steps, to identify morphologic regions (digital biomarkers) that are highly associating with one or the other treatment response group. We tested the classifier using a separate 22 slide test set, and 18/22 slides were correctly classified. We show that a neural network based approach can discriminate extremes in patient response to primary platinum-based chemotherapy with high sensitivity (73%) and specificity (91%). These proof-of-concept results are novel, because for the first time, prospective prognostic information is identified specifically within HGSC tumor morphology.
  • Fusciello, Manlio; Fontana, Flavia; Tähtinen, Siri; Capasso, Cristian; Feola, Sara; da Silva Lopes Martins, Beatriz; Chiaro, Jacopo; Peltonen, Karita; Ylösmäki, Leena; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Hamdan Hissaoui, Firas; Kari, Otto K.; Ndika, Joseph; Alenius, Harri; Urtti, Arto; Hirvonen, Jouni T.; Santos, Hélder A.; Cerullo, Vincenzo (2019)
    Virus-based cancer vaccines are nowadays considered an interesting approach in the field of cancer immunotherapy, despite the observation that the majority of the immune responses they elicit are against the virus and not against the tumor. In contrast, targeting tumor associated antigens is effective, however the identification of these antigens remains challenging. Here, we describe ExtraCRAd, a multi-vaccination strategy focused on an oncolytic virus artificially wrapped with tumor cancer membranes carrying tumor antigens. We demonstrate that ExtraCRAd displays increased infectivity and oncolytic effect in vitro and in vivo. We show that this nanoparticle platform controls the growth of aggressive melanoma and lung tumors in vivo both in preventive and therapeutic setting, creating a highly specific anti-cancer immune response. In conclusion, ExtraCRAd might serve as the next generation of personalized cancer vaccines with enhanced features over standard vaccination regimens, representing an alternative way to target cancer.
  • Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B.; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemacon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J.; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valerie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S.; Caligo, Maria A.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Nevanlinna, Heli; EMBRACE; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; kConFab Investigators (2017)
    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of similar to 320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 x 10(-6)). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.
  • Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2015)
    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients.
  • Ahonen, Marko T.; Diaconu, Iulia; Pesonen, Sari; Kanerva, Anna; Baumann, Marc; Parviainen, Suvi T.; Spiller, Brad; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli (2010)
  • Kanerva, Anna; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Oksanen, Minna; Joensuu, Timo; Hemminki, Otto; Palmgren, Juni; Hemminki, Kari; Hemminki, Akseli (2015)
  • Hallamies, Sanna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Poikonen-Saksela, Paula; Jekunen, Antti; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Auvinen, Paivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Mattson, Johanna; Nevanlinna, Heli (2017)
    Background: Several susceptibility genes have been established for female breast cancer, of which mutations in BRCA1 and especially in BRCA2 are also known risk factors for male breast cancer (MBC). The role of other breast cancer genes in MBC is less well understood. Methods: In this study, we have genotyped 68 MBC patients for the known breast or ovarian cancer associated mutations in the Finnish population in CHEK2, PALB2, RAD51C, RAD51D, and FANCM genes. Results: CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation was found in 4 patients (5.9%), which is significantly more frequent than in the control population (OR: 4.47, 95% CI 1.51-13.18, p = 0.019). Four CHEK2 I157T variants were also detected, but the frequency did not significantly differ from population controls (p = 0.781). No RAD51C, RAD51D, PALB2, or FANCM mutations were found. Conclusions: These data suggest that the CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation is associated with an increased risk for MBC in the Finnish population.
  • PRACTICAL Consortium; Bouras, Emmanouil; Karhunen, Ville; Gill, Dipender; Ahola-Olli, Ari; Mannikko, Minna; Auvinen, Juha; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K. (2022)
    Background Epidemiological and experimental evidence has linked chronic inflammation to cancer aetiology. It is unclear whether associations for specific inflammatory biomarkers are causal or due to bias. In order to examine whether altered genetically predicted concentration of circulating cytokines are associated with cancer development, we performed a two-sample Mendelian randomisation (MR) analysis. Methods Up to 31,112 individuals of European descent were included in genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses of 47 circulating cytokines. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) robustly associated with the cytokines, located in or close to their coding gene (cis), were used as instrumental variables. Inverse-variance weighted MR was used as the primary analysis, and the MR assumptions were evaluated in sensitivity and colocalization analyses and a false discovery rate (FDR) correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Corresponding germline GWAS summary data for five cancer outcomes (breast, endometrial, lung, ovarian, and prostate), and their subtypes were selected from the largest cancer-specific GWASs available (cases ranging from 12,906 for endometrial to 133,384 for breast cancer). Results There was evidence of inverse associations of macrophage migration inhibitory factor with breast cancer (OR per SD = 0.88, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.94), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist with endometrial cancer (0.86, 0.80 to 0.93), interleukin-18 with lung cancer (0.87, 0.81 to 0.93), and beta-chemokine-RANTES with ovarian cancer (0.70, 0.57 to 0.85) and positive associations of monokine induced by gamma interferon with endometrial cancer (3.73, 1.86 to 7.47) and cutaneous T-cell attracting chemokine with lung cancer (1.51, 1.22 to 1.87). These associations were similar in sensitivity analyses and supported in colocalization analyses. Conclusions Our study adds to current knowledge on the role of specific inflammatory biomarker pathways in cancer aetiology. Further validation is needed to assess the potential of these cytokines as pharmacological or lifestyle targets for cancer prevention.
  • Ahtiainen, Laura; Mirantes, Cristina; Jahkola, Tiina; Escutenaire, Sophie; Diaconu, Iulia; Osterlund, Pamela; Kanerva, Anna; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli (2010)
  • Deng, Shan; Yang, Xiaojun; Lassus, Heini; Liang, Shun; Kaur, Sippy; Ye, Qunrui; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Li-Ping; Roby, Katherine F.; Orsulic, Sandra; Connolly, Denise C.; Zhang, Youcheng; Montone, Kathleen; Butzow, Ralf; Coukos, George; Zhang, Lin (2010)
  • Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclova, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Diez, Orland; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina; Conejero, Raquel Andres; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Beattie, Mary S.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; SWE-BRCA; HEBON; kConFab Investigators (2014)
  • Heiniö, Camilla; Sorsa, Suvi; Siurala, Mikko; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Havunen, Riikka; Haavisto, Elina; Koski, Anniina; Hemminki, Otto; Zafar, Sadia; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Munaro, Eleonora; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2019)
    After the discovery and characterization of the adenovirus in the 1950s, this prevalent cause of the common cold and other usually mild diseases has been modified and utilized in biomedicine in several ways. To date, adenoviruses are the most frequently used vectors and therapeutic (e.g., oncolytic) agents with a number of beneficial features. They infect both dividing and nondividing cells, enable high-level, transient protein expression, and are easy to amplify to high concentrations. As an important and versatile research tool, it is of essence to understand the limits and advantages that genetic modification of adenovirus vectors may entail. Therefore, a retrospective analysis was performed of adenoviral gene therapy constructs produced in the same laboratory with similar methods. The aim was to assess the impact of various modifications on the physical and functional titer of the virus. It was found that genome size (designed within "the 105% golden rule") did not significantly affect the physical titer of the adenovirus preparations, regardless of the type of transgene (e.g., immunostimulatory vs. other), number of engineered changes, and size of the mutated virus genome. One statistically significant exception was noted, however. Chimeric adenoviruses (5/3) had a slightly lower physical titer compared to Ad5-based viruses, although a trend for the opposite was true for functional titers. Thus, 5/3 chimeric viruses may in fact be appealing from a safety versus efficacy viewpoint. Armed viruses had lower functional and physical titers than unarmed viruses, while five genomic modifications started to decrease functional titer. Importantly, even highly modified armed viruses generally had good titers compatible with clinical testing. In summary, this paper shows the plasticity of adenovirus for various vector, oncolytic, and armed oncolytic uses. These results inform future generations of adenovirus-based drugs for human use. This information is directly transferable to academic laboratories and the biomedical industry involved in vector design and production optimization.
  • Endometriosis Guideline Core Grp; ESHRE Endometriosis Guideline Grp; Becker, Christian M.; Bokor, Attila; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Vermeulen, Nathalie (2022)
    STUDY QUESTION: How should endometriosis be diagnosed and managed based on the best available evidence from published literature? SUMMARY ANSWER: The current guideline provides 109 recommendations on diagnosis, treatments for pain and infertility, management of disease recurrence, asymptomatic or extrapelvic disease, endometriosis in adolescents and postmenopausal women, prevention and the association with cancer. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Endometriosis is a chronic condition with a plethora of presentations in terms of not only the occurrence of lesions, but also the presence of signs and symptoms. The most important symptoms include pain and infertility. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: The guideline was developed according to the structured methodology for development of ESHRE guidelines. After formulation of key questions by a group of experts, literature searches and assessments were performed. Papers published up to 1 December 2020 and written in English were included in the literature review. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Based on the collected evidence, recommendations were formulated and discussed within specialist subgroups and then presented to the core guideline development group (GDG) until consensus was reached. A stakeholder review was organized after finalization of the draft. The final version was approved by the GDG and the ESHRE Executive Committee. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: This guideline aims to help clinicians to apply best care for women with endometriosis. Although studies mostly focus on women of reproductive age, the guideline also addresses endometriosis in adolescents and postmenopausal women. The guideline outlines the diagnostic process for endometriosis, which challenges laparoscopy and histology as gold standard diagnostic tests. The options for treatment of endometriosis-associated pain symptoms include analgesics, medical treatments and surgery. Non-pharmacological treatments are also discussed. For management of endometriosis-associated infertility, surgical treatment and/or medically assisted reproduction are feasible. While most of the more recent studies confirm previous ESHRE recommendations, there are five topics in which significant changes to recommendations were required and changes in clinical practice are to be expected. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The guideline describes different management options but, based on existing evidence, no firm recommendations could be formulated on the most appropriate treatments. Also, for specific clinical issues, such as asymptomatic endometriosis or extrapelvic endometriosis, the evidence is too scarce to make evidence-based recommendations. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: The guideline provides clinicians with clear advice on best practice in endometriosis care, based on the best evidence currently available. In addition, a list of research recommendations is provided to stimulate further studies in endometriosis.
  • Purrington, Kristen S.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Wang, Chen; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Cox, Angela; Giles, Graham G.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lakis, Sotiris; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Fountzilas, George; Kabisch, Maria; Ruediger, Thomas; Heikkila, Paivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Cross, Simon S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Olson, Janet E.; Gilbert, Judy; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Jones, J. Louise; Zheng, Wei; Mannermaa, Arto; Eccles, Diana M.; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Jane Carpenter ABCTC Investigators (2016)
    Distinct subtypes of triple negative (TN) breast cancer have been identified by tumor expression profiling. However, little is known about the relationship between histopathologic features of TN tumors, which reflect aspects of both tumor behavior and tumor microenvironment, and molecular TN subtypes. The histopathologic features of TN tumors were assessed by central review and 593 TN tumors were subjected to whole genome expression profiling using the Illumina Whole Genome DASL array. TN molecular subtypes were defined based on gene expression data associated with histopathologic features of TN tumors. Gene expression analysis yielded signatures for four TN subtypes (basal-like, androgen receptor positive, immune, and stromal) consistent with previous studies. Expression analysis also identified genes significantly associated with the 12 histological features of TN tumors. Development of signatures using these markers of histopathological features resulted in six distinct TN subtype signatures, including an additional basal-like and stromal signature. The additional basal-like subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of cell motility and glucose metabolism genes and reduced expression of immune signaling genes, whereas the additional stromal subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of immunomodulatory pathway genes. Histopathologic features that reflect heterogeneity in tumor architecture, cell structure, and tumor microenvironment are related to TN subtype. Accounting for histopathologic features in the development of gene expression signatures, six major subtypes of TN breast cancer were identified.
  • Belitskin, Denis; Pant, Shishir M.; Munne, Pauliina; Suleymanova, Ilida; Belitskina, Kati; Ala-Hongisto, Hanna; Englund, Johanna; Raatikainen, Tiina; Klezovitch, Olga; Vasioukhin, Valeri; Li, Shuo; Wu, Qingyu; Monni, Outi; Kuure, Satu; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Pouwels, Jeroen; Tervonen, Topi A.; Klefström, Juha (2021)
    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine with a well-established role in mammary gland development and both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions. The extracellular matrix (ECM) indirectly regulates TGF beta activity by acting as a storage compartment of latent-TGF beta, but how TGF beta is released from the ECM via proteolytic mechanisms remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that hepsin, a type II transmembrane protease overexpressed in 70% of breast tumors, promotes canonical TGF beta signaling through the release of latent-TGF beta from the ECM storage compartment. Mammary glands in hepsin CRISPR knockout mice showed reduced TGF beta signaling and increased epithelial branching, accompanied by increased levels of fibronectin and latent-TGF beta 1, while overexpression of hepsin in mammary tumors increased TGF beta signaling. Cell-free and cell-based experiments showed that hepsin is capable of direct proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin but not latent-TGF beta and, importantly, that the ability of hepsin to activate TGF beta signaling is dependent on fibronectin. Altogether, this study demonstrates a role for hepsin as a regulator of the TGF beta pathway in the mammary gland via a novel mechanism involving proteolytic downmodulation of fibronectin.
  • Färkkilä, Anniina; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Oikkonen, Jaana; Gulhan, Doga C.; Huy Nguyen; Dominguez, Julieta; Ramos, Sandra; Mills, Caitlin E.; Perez-Villatoro, Fernando; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Zhou, Jia; Clairmont, Connor S.; Moreau, Lisa A.; Park, Peter J.; Sorger, Peter K.; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frias, Sara; D'Andrea, Alan D. (2021)
    Homologous recombination (HR)-deficient cancers are sensitive to poly- ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors (PARPi), which have shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of high-grade serous cancers (HGSC). However, the majority of patients will relapse, and acquired PARPi resistance is emerging as a pressing clinical problem. Here we generated seven single-cell clones with acquired PARPi resistance derived from a PARPi-sensitive TP53(-/-) and BRCA1(-/-) epithelial cell line generated using CRISPR/Cas9. These clones showed diverse resistance mechanisms, and some clones presented with multiple mechanisms of resistance at the same time. Genomic analysis of the clones revealed unique transcriptional and mutational profiles and increased genomic instability in comparison with a PARPi-sensitive cell line. Clonal evolutionary analyses suggested that acquired PARPi resistance arose via clonal selection from an intrinsically unstable and heterogenous cell population in the sensitive cell line, which contained preexisting drug-tolerant cells. Similarly, clonal and spatial heterogeneity in tumor biopsies from a clinical patient with BRCA1-mutant HGSC with acquired PARPi resistance was observed. In an imaging-based drug screening, the clones showed heterogenous responses to targeted therapeutic agents, indicating that not all PARPi-resistant clones can be targeted with just one therapy. Furthermore, PARPi-resistant clones showed mechanism-dependent vulnerabilities to the selected agents, demonstrating that a deeper understanding on the mechanisms of resistance could lead to improved targeting and biomarkers for HGSC with acquired PARPi resistance. Significance: This study shows that BRCA1-deficient cells can give rise to multiple genomically and functionally heterogenous PARPi-resistant clones, which are associated with various vulnerabilities that can be targeted in a mechanism-specific manner.
  • Gaudet, Mia M.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Vijai, Joseph; Klein, Robert J.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Healey, Sue; Dicks, Ed; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olgam.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Wang, Xianshu; Eldridge, Ronald C.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Garber, Judith; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Goldgar, David E.; D'Andrea, Emma; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; kConFab Investigators; Ontario Canc Genetics Network; HEBON; EMBRACE; GEMO Study Collaborators; GENICA Network (2013)