Browsing by Subject "OVARIAN-CANCER"

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  • Havunen, Riikka; Santos, Joao M.; Sorsa, Suvi; Rantapero, Tommi; Lumen, Dave; Siurala, Mikko; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Tähtinen, Siri; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    Cancer treatment with local administration of armed oncolytic viruses could potentially induce systemic antitumor effects, or the abscopal effect, as they self-amplify in tumors, induce danger signaling, and promote tumor-associated antigen presentation. In this study, oncolytic adenovirus coding for human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 (also known as [a.k.a.] TILT-123) provoked antitumor efficacy in tumors that were injected with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 and those that were left non-injected in the same animal. Importantly, the virus was able to travel to distant tumors. To dissect the effects of oncolysis and cytokines, we studied replication-incompetent viruses in mice. Systemic antitumor effects were similar in both models, highlighting the importance of the arming device. The cytokines induced positive changes in immune cell infiltrates and induced the expression of several immune-reaction-related genes in tumors. In addition, Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 was able to increase homing of adoptively transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes into both injected and non-injected tumors, possibly mediated through chemokine expression. In summary, local treatment with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 resulted in systemic antitumor efficacy by inducing immune cell infiltration and trafficking into both treated and untreated tumors. Moreover, the oncolytic adenovirus platform had superior systemic effects over replication-deficient vector through spreading into distant tumors.
  • Garofalo, M.; Saari, H.; Somersalo, P.; Crescenti, D.; Kuryk, L.; Aksela, L.; Capasso, C.; Madetoja, M.; Koskinen, K.; Oksanen, T.; Mäkitie, A.; Jalasvuori, M.; Cerullo, V.; Ciana, P.; Yliperttula, M. (2018)
    Standard of care for cancer is commonly a combination of surgery with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, in some advanced cancer patients this approach might still remaininefficient and may cause many side effects, including severe complications and even death. Oncolytic viruses exhibit different anti-cancer mechanisms compared with conventional therapies, allowing the possibility for improved effect in cancer therapy. Chemotherapeutics combined with oncolytic viruses exhibit stronger cytotoxic responses and oncolysis. Here, we have investigated the systemic delivery of the oncolytic adenovirus and paclitaxel encapsulated in extracellular vesicles (EV) formulation that, in vitro, significantly increased the transduction ratio and the infectious titer when compared with the virus and paclitaxel alone. We demonstrated that the obtained EV formulation reduced the in vivo tumor growth in animal xenograft model of human lung cancer. Indeed, we found that combined treatment of oncolytic adenovirus and paclitaxel encapsulated in EV has enhanced anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo in lung cancer models. Transcriptomic comparison carried out on the explanted xenografts from the different treatment groups revealed that only 5.3% of the differentially expressed genes were overlapping indicating that a de novo genetic program is triggered by the presence of the encapsulated paclitaxel: this novel genetic program might be responsible of the observed enhanced antitumor effect. Our work provides a promising approach combining anticancer drugs and viral therapies by intravenous EV delivery as a strategy for the lung cancer treatment.
  • Fusciello, Manlio; Fontana, Flavia; Tähtinen, Siri; Capasso, Cristian; Feola, Sara; da Silva Lopes Martins, Beatriz; Chiaro, Jacopo; Peltonen, Karita; Ylösmäki, Leena; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Hamdan Hissaoui, Firas; Kari, Otto K.; Ndika, Joseph; Alenius, Harri; Urtti, Arto; Hirvonen, Jouni T.; Santos, Hélder A.; Cerullo, Vincenzo (2019)
    Virus-based cancer vaccines are nowadays considered an interesting approach in the field of cancer immunotherapy, despite the observation that the majority of the immune responses they elicit are against the virus and not against the tumor. In contrast, targeting tumor associated antigens is effective, however the identification of these antigens remains challenging. Here, we describe ExtraCRAd, a multi-vaccination strategy focused on an oncolytic virus artificially wrapped with tumor cancer membranes carrying tumor antigens. We demonstrate that ExtraCRAd displays increased infectivity and oncolytic effect in vitro and in vivo. We show that this nanoparticle platform controls the growth of aggressive melanoma and lung tumors in vivo both in preventive and therapeutic setting, creating a highly specific anti-cancer immune response. In conclusion, ExtraCRAd might serve as the next generation of personalized cancer vaccines with enhanced features over standard vaccination regimens, representing an alternative way to target cancer.
  • Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B.; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemacon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J.; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valerie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S.; Caligo, Maria A.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Nevanlinna, Heli; EMBRACE; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators (2017)
    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of similar to 320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 x 10(-6)). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.
  • Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2015)
    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients.
  • Ahonen, Marko T.; Diaconu, Iulia; Pesonen, Sari; Kanerva, Anna; Baumann, Marc; Parviainen, Suvi T.; Spiller, Brad; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli (2010)
  • Kanerva, Anna; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Oksanen, Minna; Joensuu, Timo; Hemminki, Otto; Palmgren, Juni; Hemminki, Kari; Hemminki, Akseli (2015)
  • Hallamies, Sanna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Poikonen-Saksela, Paula; Jekunen, Antti; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Auvinen, Paivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Mattson, Johanna; Nevanlinna, Heli (2017)
    Background: Several susceptibility genes have been established for female breast cancer, of which mutations in BRCA1 and especially in BRCA2 are also known risk factors for male breast cancer (MBC). The role of other breast cancer genes in MBC is less well understood. Methods: In this study, we have genotyped 68 MBC patients for the known breast or ovarian cancer associated mutations in the Finnish population in CHEK2, PALB2, RAD51C, RAD51D, and FANCM genes. Results: CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation was found in 4 patients (5.9%), which is significantly more frequent than in the control population (OR: 4.47, 95% CI 1.51-13.18, p = 0.019). Four CHEK2 I157T variants were also detected, but the frequency did not significantly differ from population controls (p = 0.781). No RAD51C, RAD51D, PALB2, or FANCM mutations were found. Conclusions: These data suggest that the CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation is associated with an increased risk for MBC in the Finnish population.
  • Ahtiainen, Laura; Mirantes, Cristina; Jahkola, Tiina; Escutenaire, Sophie; Diaconu, Iulia; Osterlund, Pamela; Kanerva, Anna; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli (2010)
  • Deng, Shan; Yang, Xiaojun; Lassus, Heini; Liang, Shun; Kaur, Sippy; Ye, Qunrui; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Li-Ping; Roby, Katherine F.; Orsulic, Sandra; Connolly, Denise C.; Zhang, Youcheng; Montone, Kathleen; Butzow, Ralf; Coukos, George; Zhang, Lin (2010)
  • Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclova, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Diez, Orland; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina; Conejero, Raquel Andres; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Beattie, Mary S.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; SWE-BRCA; HEBON; KConFab Investigators (2014)
  • Heiniö, Camilla; Sorsa, Suvi; Siurala, Mikko; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Havunen, Riikka; Haavisto, Elina; Koski, Anniina; Hemminki, Otto; Zafar, Sadia; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Munaro, Eleonora; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2019)
    After the discovery and characterization of the adenovirus in the 1950s, this prevalent cause of the common cold and other usually mild diseases has been modified and utilized in biomedicine in several ways. To date, adenoviruses are the most frequently used vectors and therapeutic (e.g., oncolytic) agents with a number of beneficial features. They infect both dividing and nondividing cells, enable high-level, transient protein expression, and are easy to amplify to high concentrations. As an important and versatile research tool, it is of essence to understand the limits and advantages that genetic modification of adenovirus vectors may entail. Therefore, a retrospective analysis was performed of adenoviral gene therapy constructs produced in the same laboratory with similar methods. The aim was to assess the impact of various modifications on the physical and functional titer of the virus. It was found that genome size (designed within "the 105% golden rule") did not significantly affect the physical titer of the adenovirus preparations, regardless of the type of transgene (e.g., immunostimulatory vs. other), number of engineered changes, and size of the mutated virus genome. One statistically significant exception was noted, however. Chimeric adenoviruses (5/3) had a slightly lower physical titer compared to Ad5-based viruses, although a trend for the opposite was true for functional titers. Thus, 5/3 chimeric viruses may in fact be appealing from a safety versus efficacy viewpoint. Armed viruses had lower functional and physical titers than unarmed viruses, while five genomic modifications started to decrease functional titer. Importantly, even highly modified armed viruses generally had good titers compatible with clinical testing. In summary, this paper shows the plasticity of adenovirus for various vector, oncolytic, and armed oncolytic uses. These results inform future generations of adenovirus-based drugs for human use. This information is directly transferable to academic laboratories and the biomedical industry involved in vector design and production optimization.
  • Purrington, Kristen S.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Wang, Chen; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Cox, Angela; Giles, Graham G.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lakis, Sotiris; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Fountzilas, George; Kabisch, Maria; Ruediger, Thomas; Heikkila, Paivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Cross, Simon S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Olson, Janet E.; Gilbert, Judy; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Jones, J. Louise; Zheng, Wei; Mannermaa, Arto; Eccles, Diana M.; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Jane Carpenter ABCTC Investigators (2016)
    Distinct subtypes of triple negative (TN) breast cancer have been identified by tumor expression profiling. However, little is known about the relationship between histopathologic features of TN tumors, which reflect aspects of both tumor behavior and tumor microenvironment, and molecular TN subtypes. The histopathologic features of TN tumors were assessed by central review and 593 TN tumors were subjected to whole genome expression profiling using the Illumina Whole Genome DASL array. TN molecular subtypes were defined based on gene expression data associated with histopathologic features of TN tumors. Gene expression analysis yielded signatures for four TN subtypes (basal-like, androgen receptor positive, immune, and stromal) consistent with previous studies. Expression analysis also identified genes significantly associated with the 12 histological features of TN tumors. Development of signatures using these markers of histopathological features resulted in six distinct TN subtype signatures, including an additional basal-like and stromal signature. The additional basal-like subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of cell motility and glucose metabolism genes and reduced expression of immune signaling genes, whereas the additional stromal subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of immunomodulatory pathway genes. Histopathologic features that reflect heterogeneity in tumor architecture, cell structure, and tumor microenvironment are related to TN subtype. Accounting for histopathologic features in the development of gene expression signatures, six major subtypes of TN breast cancer were identified.
  • Gaudet, Mia M.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Vijai, Joseph; Klein, Robert J.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Healey, Sue; Dicks, Ed; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olgam.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Wang, Xianshu; Eldridge, Ronald C.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Garber, Judith; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Goldgar, David E.; D'Andrea, Emma; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; KConFab Investigators; Ontario Canc Genetics Network; HEBON; EMBRACE; GEMO Study Collaborators; GENICA Network (2013)
  • Zeng, Chenjie; Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Droit, Arnaud; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kar, Siddhartha; Freeman, Adam; Hopper, John L.; Milne, Roger L.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Arason, Adalgeir; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Bacot, Francois; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J.; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Bruening, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Carpenter, Jane; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; EMBRACE; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab; AOCS Investigators (2016)
    Background: Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk. Method: We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more than 1300 imputed genetic variants in 48,155 cases and 43,612 controls of European descent, 6269 cases and 6624 controls of East Asian descent and 1116 cases and 932 controls of African descent in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC; http://bcac.ccge.medschl.cam.ac.uk/), and in 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Stepwise regression analyses were performed to identify independent association signals. Data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project (ENCODE) and the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used for functional annotation. Results: Analysis of data from European descendants found evidence for four independent association signals at 12p11, represented by rs7297051 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.12; P = 3 x 10(-9)), rs805510 (OR = 1.08, 95 % CI = 1.04-1.12, P = 2 x 10(-5)), and rs1871152 (OR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.06; P = 2 x 10(-4)) identified in the general populations, and rs113824616 (P = 7 x 10(-5)) identified in the meta-analysis of BCAC ER-negative cases and BRCA1 mutation carriers. SNPs rs7297051, rs805510 and rs113824616 were also associated with breast cancer risk at P <0.05 in East Asians, but none of the associations were statistically significant in African descendants. Multiple candidate functional variants are located in putative enhancer sequences. Chromatin interaction data suggested that PTHLH was the likely target gene of these enhancers. Of the six variants with the strongest evidence of potential functionality, rs11049453 was statistically significantly associated with the expression of PTHLH and its nearby gene CCDC91 at P <0.05. Conclusion: This study identified four independent association signals at 12p11 and revealed potentially functional variants, providing additional insights into the underlying biological mechanism(s) for the association observed between variants at 12p11 and breast cancer risk.
  • Häkkinen, Antti; Alkodsi, Amjad; Facciotto, Chiara; Zhang, Kaiyang; Kaipio, Katja; Leppa, Sirpa; Carpen, Olli; Grenman, Seija; Hynninen, Johanna; Hietanen, Sakari; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa (2018)
    Motivation: DNA methylation aberrations are common in many cancer types. A major challenge hindering comparison of patient-derived samples is that they comprise of heterogeneous collection of cancer and microenvironment cells. We present a computational method that allows comparing cancer methylomes in two or more heterogeneous tumor samples featuring differing, unknown fraction of cancer cells. The method is unique in that it allows comparison also in the absence of normal cell control samples and without prior tumor purity estimates, as these are often unavailable or unreliable in clinical samples. Results: We use simulations and next-generation methylome, RNA and whole-genome sequencing data from two cancer types to demonstrate that the method is accurate and outperforms alternatives. The results show that our method adapts well to various cancer types and to a wide range of tumor content, and works robustly without a control or with controls derived from various sources.
  • Hemminki, Otto; Parviainen, Suvi; Juhila, Juuso; Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Lundin, Johan; Kankainen, Matti; Ristimaki, Ari; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Oksanen, Minna; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.; Kairemo, Kalevi; Partanen, Kaarina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2015)
    Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate in tumor cells can be used for treatment of cancer. Accumulating data suggests that virus induced oncolysis can enhance anti-tumor immunity and break immune tolerance. To capitalize on the immunogenic nature of oncolysis, we generated a quadruple modified oncolytic adenovirus expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF). Ad5/3-E2F-Delta 24-GMCSF (CGTG-602) was engineered to contain a tumor specific E2F1 promoter driving an E1 gene deleted at the retinoblastoma protein binding site ("Delta 24"). The fiber features a knob from serotype 3 for enhanced gene delivery to tumor cells. The virus was tested preclinically in vitro and in vivo and then 13 patients with solid tumors refractory to standard therapies were treated. Treatments were well tolerated and frequent tumor-and adenovirus-specific T-cell immune responses were seen. Overall, with regard to tumor marker or radiological responses, signs of antitumor efficacy were seen in 9/12 evaluable patients (75%). The radiological disease control rate with positron emission tomography was 83% while the response rate (including minor responses) was 50%. Tumor biopsies indicated accumulation of immunological cells, especially T-cells, to tumors after treatment. RNA expression analyses of tumors indicated immunological activation and metabolic changes secondary to virus replication.
  • Kovac, Bianca; Makela, Tomi P.; Vallenius, Tea (2018)
    The controlled formation and stabilization of E-cadherin-based adhesions is vital for epithelial integrity. This requires co-operation between the E-cadherin-based adhesions and the associated actin cytoskeleton. In cancer, this co-operation often fails, predisposing cells to migration through molecular mechanisms that have only been partially characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the actin filament cross-linker alpha-actinin-1 is frequently increased in human breast cancer. In mammary epithelial cells, the increased alpha-actinin-1 levels promote cell migration and induce disorganized acini-like structures in Matrigel. This is accompanied by a major reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the associated E-cadherin-based adhesions. Increased expression of alpha-actinin-1 is particularly noted in basal-like breast cancer cell lines, and in breast cancer patients it associates with poor prognosis in basal-like subtypes. Downregulation of alpha-actinin-1 in E-cadherin expressing basal-like breast cancer cells demonstrate that alpha-actinin-1-assembled actin fibers destabilize E-cadherin-based adhesions. Taken together, these results indicate that increased alpha-actinin-1 expression destabilizes E-cadherin-based adhesions, which is likely to promote the migratory potential of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, our results identify alpha-actinin-1 as a candidate prognostic biomarker in basal-like breast cancer.
  • Gaber, Alexander; Nodin, Bjorn; Hotakainen, Kristiina; Nilsson, Elise; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Bjartell, Anders; Birgisson, Helgi; Jirstrom, Karin (2010)
  • Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Friebel, Tara M.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Chen, Stephanie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Raanan; Berthet, Pascaline; Borg, Ake; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Carter, Jonathan; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cybulski, Cezary; Daly, Mary B.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Durda, Katarzyna; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Foretova, Lenka; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; John, Esther M.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Nevanlinna, Heli; EMBRACE; HEBON; KConFab Investigators (2016)
    Background: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. Methods: From 32,295 female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we identified 93 TH (0.3 %). "Cases" were defined as TH, and "controls" were single mutations at BRCA1 (SH1) or BRCA2 (SH2). Matched SH1 "controls" carried a BRCA1 mutation found in the TH "case". Matched SH2 "controls" carried a BRCA2 mutation found in the TH "case". After matching the TH carriers with SH1 or SH2, 91 TH were matched to 9316 SH1, and 89 TH were matched to 3370 SH2. Results: The majority of TH (45.2 %) involved the three common Jewish mutations. TH were more likely than SH1 and SH2 women to have been ever diagnosed with breast cancer (BC; p = 0.002). TH were more likely to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer (OC) than SH2 (p = 0.017), but not SH1. Age at BC diagnosis was the same in TH vs. SH1 (p = 0.231), but was on average 4.5 years younger in TH than in SH2 (p <0.001). BC in TH was more likely to be estrogen receptor (ER) positive (p = 0.010) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive (p = 0.013) than in SH1, but less likely to be ER positive (p <0.001) or PR positive (p = 0.012) than SH2. Among 15 tumors from TH patients, there was no clear pattern of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for BRCA1 or BRCA2 in either BC or OC. Conclusions: Our observations suggest that clinical TH phenotypes resemble SH1. However, TH breast tumor marker characteristics are phenotypically intermediate to SH1 and SH2.