Browsing by Subject "OXIDIZED LDL"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-1 of 1
  • Akhi, R.; Wang, C.; Nissinen, A. E.; Kankaanpaa, J.; Bloigu, R.; Paju, S.; Mantyla, P.; Buhlin, K.; Sinisalo, J.; Pussinen, P. J.; Horkko, S. (2019)
    A large body of literature has established the link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (OxLDLs) have a crucial role in atherosclerosis progression through initiation of immunological response. Monoclonal IgM antibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL) and to malondialdehyde acetaldehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MAA-LDL) have been shown to cross-react with the key virulence factors of periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We have previously shown that salivary IgA antibodies to MAA-LDL cross-react with P. gingivalis in healthy humans. In this study, we aim to assess whether oral mucosal immune response represented by salivary IgA to MAA-LDL and oral pathogens is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). Also, the molecular mimicry through antibody cross-reaction between salivary IgA to MAA-LDL and oral pathogens was evaluated. The study subjects consisted of 451 patients who underwent a coronary angiography with no CAD (n = 133), stable CAD (n = 169), and acute coronary syndrome (ACS, n = 149). Elevated salivary IgA antibody levels to MAA-LDL, Rgp44 (gingipain A hemagglutinin domain of P. gingivalis), and Aa-HSP60 (heat shock protein 60 of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were discovered in stable-CAD and ACS patients when compared to no-CAD patients. In a multinomial regression model adjusted for known cardiovascular risk factors, stable CAD and ACS were associated with IgA to MAA-LDL (P = 0.016, P = 0.043), Rgp44 (P = 0.012, P = 0.004), Aa-HSP60 (P = 0.032, P = 0.030), Tannerella forsythia (P = 0.002, P = 0.004), Porphyromonas endodontalis (P = 0.016, P = 0.020), Prevotella intermedia (P = 0.038, P = 0.005), and with total IgA antibody concentration (P = 0.002, P = 0.016). Salivary IgA to MAA-LDL showed cross-reactivity with the oral pathogens tested in the study patients. The study highlights an association between salivary IgA to MAA-LDL and atherosclerosis. However, whether salivary IgA to MAA-LDL and the related oral humoral responses play a causal role in the development in the CAD should be elucidated in the future.