Browsing by Subject "Old Testament studies"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-10 of 10
  • Alstola, Tero (Suomen eksegeettinen seura, 2020)
    Suomen eksegeettisen seuran julkaisuja
  • Alstola, Tero (Suomen eksegeettinen seura, 2020)
    Suomen eksegeettisen seuran julkaisuja
  • Alstola, Tero (2017)
    This article focuses on Judean merchants in Babylonia, their social networks, and their business activities in the sixth century BCE. I argue that these people were integrated into the commercial sphere of Babylonian society and that they had native Babylonian merchants as well as traders of foreign origin among their acquaintances. Judeans participated in Babylonian long-distance trade, and documented evidence shows that some of them travelled as far as Iran for the purpose of trading. Furthermore, because travelling and the transportation of goods are an integral part of commercial activity, merchants provide an example of people who could have maintained connections between Judeans living in Judah and Babylonia.
  • Alstola, Tero (Brill, 2020)
    Culture and History of the Ancient Near East
    In Judeans in Babylonia, Tero Alstola presents a comprehensive investigation of deportees in the sixth and fifth centuries BCE. By using cuneiform documents as his sources, he offers the first book-length social historical study of the Babylonian Exile, commonly regarded as a pivotal period in the development of Judaism. The results are considered in the light of the wider Babylonian society and contrasted against a comparison group of Neirabian deportees. Studying texts from the cities and countryside and tracking developments over time, Alstola shows that there was notable diversity in the Judeans’ socio-economic status and integration into Babylonian society.
  • Alstola, Tero (University of Helsinki, 2018)
    This dissertation investigates the life of Judean deportees in Babylonia in the sixth and fifth centuries BCE. The results from the study of Judeans are placed in the wider context of Babylonian society and are evaluated by using a group of Neirabian deportees as a point of comparison. The sources of this study consist of 289 clay tablets written in Akkadian cuneiform, such as promissory notes, leases, receipts, and lists. The dissertation shows that there was considerable diversity in the deportees’ socio-economic status and integration into Babylonian society. The majority of deportees were settled in the countryside and integrated into the land-for-service system, which was aimed at increasing agricultural output and providing the state with labour, soldiers, and tax income. In addition, foreign professionals were employed in cities, and the worlds of commerce and royal administration were open to some deportees. A relatively small number of deportees were donated to Babylonian temples. The Babylonian practice of settling deportees in ethnically homogenous rural communities supported the survival of their culture and traditions in the countryside. Adoption of Babylonian names and culture was faster among those Judeans who lived in cities and were in regular contact with the native population.
  • Alstola, Tero (Suomen eksegeettinen seura, 2020)
    Suomen eksegeettisen seuran julkaisuja
  • Alstola, Tero (Suomen eksegeettinen seura, 2020)
    Suomen eksegeettisen seuran julkaisuja
  • Alstola, Tero (Suomen eksegeettinen seura, 2020)
    Suomen eksegeettisen seuran julkaisuja
  • Alstola, Tero (Suomen eksegeettinen seura, 2020)
    Suomen eksegeettisen seuran julkaisuja
  • Alstola, Tero (Suomen eksegeettinen seura, 2020)
    Suomen eksegeettisen seuran julkaisuja