Browsing by Subject "Oral glucose tolerance test"

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  • Palmu, Samuel; Kuneinen, Susanna; Kautiainen, Hannu; Eriksson, Johan G.; Korhonen, Päivi E. (2021)
    Background and aims: Current guidelines on prediabetes and diabetes (T2D) recommend to regularly perform an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on subjects at risk of T2D. However, it is not known why women tend to have relatively higher 2-h post-load plasma (2hPG) glucose concentrations during OGTT than men. The aim of the present study is to investigate if there are sex differences in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2hPG concentrations in relation to body size in apparently healthy non-diabetic subjects with normal glucose tolerance. We hypothesized that sex differences in glucose tolerance are physiological and related to different body surface area (BSA) in men and women. Methods and results: A 2-h 75 g OGTT was performed on 2010 subjects aged 45-70 years. Their BSA was calculated using the Mosteller formula. Men and women were separately divided into five BSA levels. Within the normal 2hPG range, women had higher mean 2hPG concentrations during the OGTT than men in all BSA levels estimated by sex-standardized BSA (p for linearity < 0.001). BSA adjusted for age, waist circumference, leisure-time physical activity, and smoking, showed an inverse association with 2hPG concentration in both sexes. Mean FPG concentrations were higher in men than in women. Conclusions: Body size has a negative inverse association with 2hPG concentration in an OGTT even within a physiological plasma glucose range. This may cause underestimation of glucose disorders in individuals with larger BSA and overestimation in individuals with smaller BSA when using an OGTT. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of The Italian Diabetes Society, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
  • Matz, Karl; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Teuschl, Yvonne; Dachenhausen, Alexandra; Brainin, Michael (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background Diabetes is an increasingly important risk factor for ischemic stroke and worsens stroke prognosis. Yet a large proportion of stroke patients who are eventually diabetic are undiagnosed. Therefore, it is important to have sensitive assessment of unrecognized hyperglycaemia in stroke patients. Design Secondary outcome analysis of a randomized controlled trial focussing on parameters of glucose metabolism and detection of diabetes and prediabetes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Methods A total of 130 consecutively admitted patients with AIS without previously known type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were screened for diabetes or prediabetes as part of secondary outcome analysis of a randomized controlled trial that tested lifestyle intervention to prevent post-stroke cognitive decline. Patients had the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measurements in the second week after stroke onset and after 1 year. The detection rates of diabetes and prediabetes based on the OGTT or HbA1c values were compared. Results By any of the applied tests at the second week after stroke onset 62 of 130 patients (48%) had prediabetes or T2DM. Seventy-five patients had results from both tests available, the OGTT and HbA1c; according to the OGTT 40 (53.3%) patients had normal glucose metabolism, 33 (44%) had prediabetes, two (2.7%) T2DM. In 50 (66.7%) patients the HbA1c results were normal, 24 (32%) in the prediabetic and one (1.3%) in the diabetic range. The detection rate for disorders of glucose metabolism was 10% higher (absolute difference; relative difference 29%) with the OGTT compared with HbA1c. After 1 year the detection rate for prediabetes or T2DM was 7% higher with the OGTT (26% relative difference). The study intervention led to a more favourable evolution of glycemic status after 1 year. Conclusion The OGTT is a more sensitive screening tool than HbA1c for the detection of previously unrecognized glycemic disorders in patients with acute stroke with an at least a 25% relative difference in detection rate. Therefore, an OGTT should be performed in all patients with stroke with no history of diabetes. Trial registration http://clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01109836.
  • Matz, Karl; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Teuschl, Yvonne; Dachenhausen, Alexandra; Brainin, Michael (2020)
    Background Diabetes is an increasingly important risk factor for ischemic stroke and worsens stroke prognosis. Yet a large proportion of stroke patients who are eventually diabetic are undiagnosed. Therefore, it is important to have sensitive assessment of unrecognized hyperglycaemia in stroke patients. Design Secondary outcome analysis of a randomized controlled trial focussing on parameters of glucose metabolism and detection of diabetes and prediabetes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Methods A total of 130 consecutively admitted patients with AIS without previously known type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were screened for diabetes or prediabetes as part of secondary outcome analysis of a randomized controlled trial that tested lifestyle intervention to prevent post-stroke cognitive decline. Patients had the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measurements in the second week after stroke onset and after 1 year. The detection rates of diabetes and prediabetes based on the OGTT or HbA1c values were compared. Results By any of the applied tests at the second week after stroke onset 62 of 130 patients (48%) had prediabetes or T2DM. Seventy-five patients had results from both tests available, the OGTT and HbA1c; according to the OGTT 40 (53.3%) patients had normal glucose metabolism, 33 (44%) had prediabetes, two (2.7%) T2DM. In 50 (66.7%) patients the HbA1c results were normal, 24 (32%) in the prediabetic and one (1.3%) in the diabetic range. The detection rate for disorders of glucose metabolism was 10% higher (absolute difference; relative difference 29%) with the OGTT compared with HbA1c. After 1 year the detection rate for prediabetes or T2DM was 7% higher with the OGTT (26% relative difference). The study intervention led to a more favourable evolution of glycemic status after 1 year. Conclusion The OGTT is a more sensitive screening tool than HbA1c for the detection of previously unrecognized glycemic disorders in patients with acute stroke with an at least a 25% relative difference in detection rate. Therefore, an OGTT should be performed in all patients with stroke with no history of diabetes. Trial registration. Unique identifier: NCT01109836.
  • Haverinen, Annina; Kangasniemi, Marika; Luiro, Kaisu; Piltonen, Terhi; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Tapanainen, Juha S. (2021)
    Objective: To compare the effects of two formulations of combined oral contraceptives (COCs), estradiol valerate (EV) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) combined with dienogest (DNG), and DNG-only, on glucose tolerance. Study Design: We performed a randomized, controlled 9-week clinical trial. Inclusion criteria were: age 18-35 years, regular menstrual cycle (28 +/- 7 days), no polycystic ovaries, non-smoking, no contraindications for COC use and a 2-month wash-out from hormonal contraceptive use. The women were randomized to EV + DNG (n = 20), EE + DNG (n = 20), and DNG-only (n = 19), and evaluated at baseline, at 4-5 weeks and 8-9 weeks of treatment. Study medications were used continuously for 63 days. Primary outcome measure was change in the whole-body insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda index) derived from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) over the treatment period. Secondary outcome measures were area under curves (AUC) of glucose and insulin, homeostatic model assessment - insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI). Results: Fifty-nine women enrolled, and 56 women completed the study. The Matsuda index changed from baseline as follows (mean percentage change, mean change [95%CI]): DNG-only -12%, -1.45 [95%CI -3.22-0.325] P = 0.10; EV + DNG + 2.7%, -0.10 [-1.34 to 1.14] P = 0.86; EE + DNG -5.5%, -1.02 [-2.51 to 0.46] P = 0.16, comparing the groups P = 0.27. There were no clinically significant differences in glucose tolerance between the COC groups, but the DNG-only group showed an improvement in the 2-h glucose levels (5.5 [95%CI 5.0-6.0] to 4.7 mmol/l [4.2-5.2], P = 0.001). Conclusion: We found no clinically significant differences between EV and EE combined with DNG and DNG-only on glucose tolerance in healthy, young, normal-weight women, indicating that these preparations appear close to neutral regarding glucose metabolism when used continuously for nine weeks. (C) 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Matikainen, N.; Söderlund, S.; Björnson, E.; Bogl, L. H.; Pietiläinen, K. H.; Hakkarainen, A.; Lundbom, N.; Eliasson, B.; Räsänen, Sari; Rivellese, A.; Patti, L.; Prinster, A.; Riccardi, G.; Despres, J. -P.; Almeras, N.; Holst, J. J.; Deacon, C. F.; Boren, J.; Taskinen, M. -R. (2017)
    Background and aims: Incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are affected early on in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiologic studies consistently link high fructose consumption to insulin resistance but whether fructose consumption impairs the incretin response remains unknown. Methods and results: As many as 66 obese (BMI 26-40 kg/m(2)) male subjects consumed fructose-sweetened beverages containing 75 g fructose/day for 12 weeks while continuing their usual lifestyle. Glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP were measured during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and triglycerides (TG), GLP-1, GIP and PYY during a mixed meal test before and after fructose intervention. Fructose intervention did not worsen glucose and insulin responses during OGTT, and GLP-1 and GIP responses during OGTT and fat-rich meal were unchanged. Postprandial TG response increased significantly, p = 0.004, and we observed small but significant increases in weight and liver fat content, but not in visceral or subcutaneous fat depots. However, even the subgroups who gained weight or liver fat during fructose intervention did not worsen their glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or PYY responses. A minor increase in GIP response during OGTT occurred in subjects who gained liver fat (p = 0.049). Conclusion: In obese males with features of metabolic syndrome, 12 weeks fructose intervention 75 g/day did not change glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or GIP responses during OGTT or GLP-1, GIP or PYY responses during a mixed meal. Therefore, fructose intake, even accompanied with mild weight gain, increases in liver fat and worsening of postprandial TG profile, does not impair glucose tolerance or gut incretin response to oral glucose or mixed meal challenge. (C) 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.