Browsing by Subject "Osteoarthritis"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 30
  • Nieminen, H. J.; Gahunia, H. K.; Pritzker, K. P. H.; Ylitalo, T.; Rieppo, L.; Karhula, S. S.; Lehenkari, P.; Haeggstörm, E.; Saarakkala, S. (2017)
    Objective: Histopathological grading of osteochondral (OC) tissue is widely used in osteoarthritis (OA) research, and it is relatively common in post-surgery in vitro diagnostics. However, relying on thin tissue section, this approach includes a number of limitations, such as: (1) destructiveness, (2) sample processing artefacts, (3 ) 2D section does not represent spatial 3D structure and composition of the tissue, and (4) the final outcome is subjective. To overcome these limitations, we recently developed a contrast-enhanced mu CT (CE mu CT) imaging technique to visualize the collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of articular cartilage (AC). In the present study, we demonstrate that histopathological scoring of OC tissue from CE mu CT is feasible. Moreover, we establish a new, semi-quantitative OA mu CT grading system for OC tissue. Results: Pathological features were clearly visualized in AC and subchondral bone (SB) with mu CT and verified with histology, as demonstrated with image atlases. Comparison of histopathological grades (OARSI or severity (0-3)) across the characterization approaches, CE mu CT and histology, excellent (0.92, 95% CI = [0.84, 0.96], n = 30) or fair (0.50, 95% CI = [0.16, 0.74], n = 27) intra-class correlations (ICC), respectively. A new mu CT grading system was successfully established which achieved an excellent cross-method (mu CT vs histology) reader-to-reader intra-class correlation (0.78, 95% CI = [0.58, 0.89], n = 27). Conclusions: We demonstrated that histopathological information relevant to OA can reliably be obtained from CE mu CT images. This new grading system could be used as a reference for 3D imaging and analysis techniques intended for volumetric evaluation of OA pathology in research and clinical applications. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Osteoarthritis Research Society International.
  • Kauppinen, S.; Karhula, S. S.; Thevenot, J.; Ylitalo, T.; Rieppo, L.; Kestilä, I.; Haapea, M.; Hadjab, I.; Finnilä, M. A.; Quenneville, E.; Garon, M.; Gahunia, H. K.; Pritzker, K. P. H.; Buschmann, M. D.; Saarakkala, S.; Nieminen, H. J. (2019)
    Objective: Our aim is to establish methods for quantifying morphometric properties of calcified cartilage (CC) from micro-computed tomography (mu CT). Furthermore, we evaluated the feasibility of these methods in investigating relationships between osteoarthritis (OA), tidemark surface morphology and open subchondral channels (OSCCs). Method: Samples (n = 15) used in this study were harvested from human lateral tibial plateau (n = 8). Conventional roughness and parameters assessing local 3-dimensional (3D) surface variations were used to quantify the surface morphology of the CC. Subchondral channel properties (percentage, density, size) were also calculated. As a reference, histological sections were evaluated using Histopathological osteoarthritis grading (OARSI) and thickness of CC and subchondral bone (SCB) was quantified. Results: OARSI grade correlated with a decrease in local 3D variations of the tidemark surface (amount of different surface patterns (r(s) = -0.600, P = 0.018), entropy of patterns (EP) (r(s) = -0.648, P = 0.018), homogeneity index (HI) (r(s) = 0.555, P = 0.032)) and tidemark roughness (TMR) (r(s) = -0.579, P = 0.024). Amount of different patterns (ADP) and EP associated with channel area fraction (CAF) (r(p) = 0.876, P <0.0001; r(p) = 0.665, P = 0.007, respectively) and channel density (CD) (r(p) = 0.680, P = 0.011; r(p) = 0.582, P = 0.023, respectively). TMR was associated with CAF (r(p) = 0.926, P <0.0001) and average channel size (r(p) = 0.574, P = 0.025). CC topography differed statistically significantly in early OA vs healthy samples. Conclusion: We introduced a mu-CT image method to quantify 3D CC topography and perforations through CC. CC topography was associated with OARSI grade and OSCC properties; this suggests that the established methods can detect topographical changes in tidemark and CC perforations associated with OA. (c) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Osteoarthritis Research Society International. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
  • MacKay, C.; Webster, F.; Venkataramanan, Natarajan S.; Bytautas, J.; Perruccio, A. V.; Wong, R.; Carlesso, L.; Davis, A. M. (2017)
    Objectives: Studies show limited improvement in the frequency of engaging in life activities after joint replacement. However, there is a paucity of research that has examined factors, including other life events, which influence engagement following total hip replacement (THR). This research sought to identify factors associated with engaging in life activities following THR. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted with 376 people who had a THR for osteoarthritis (OA). Data were collected pre-surgery and 1 year post-surgery. The primary outcome was change in frequency in engagement in life activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI): higher scores indicate higher frequency of engagement (range 0e80)). Analyses included multivariable regression. Factors considered included: positive/negative life events, a new comorbidity, another joint replacement and complications post-surgery. Results: Participants' mean age was 64 years; 46% were male. 68% of participants had at least one comorbidity pre-surgery; 36% reported at least one new comorbidity after surgery. The mean change in LLDI frequency was an increase of 6.29 (+/- 8.10). 36% reported one or more positive impact life events in the year following surgery; 63% reported one or more negative life events. The number of positive life events (beta=1.24; 95% CI: 0.49, 1.99) was significantly associated with change in LLDI frequency after adjusting for age, sex, education, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities pre-surgery, number of symptomatic joints and pre-surgery pain and function, LLDI limitations and depression. Conclusions: These findings highlight the significant influence of social factors and life circumstances on engagement in life activities following THR. (C) 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Käkelä, Reijo; Finnilä, Mikko A. J.; Sawatsky, Andrew; Korhonen, Rami K.; Saarakkala, Simo; Herzog, Walter; Paakkonen, Tommi; Nieminen, Petteri (2019)
    The infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) of the knee joint has received lots of attention recently due to its emerging role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA), where it displays an inflammatory phenotype. The aim of the present study was to examine the infrapatellar fatty acid (FA) composition in a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) model of early OA created by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT).
  • Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Käkelä, Reijo; Finnilä, Mikko A J; Sawatsky, Andrew; Korhonen, Rami K; Saarakkala, Simo; Herzog, Walter; Paakkonen, Tommi; Nieminen, Petteri (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background The infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) of the knee joint has received lots of attention recently due to its emerging role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA), where it displays an inflammatory phenotype. The aim of the present study was to examine the infrapatellar fatty acid (FA) composition in a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) model of early OA created by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). Methods OA was induced randomly in the left or right knee joint of skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits by ACLT, while the contralateral knee was left intact. A separate group of unoperated rabbits served as controls. The IFP of the ACLT, contralateral, and control knees were harvested following euthanasia 2 or 8 weeks post-ACLT and their FA composition was determined with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results The n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) ratio shifted in a pro-inflammatory direction after ACLT, already observed 2 weeks after the operation (0.20 ± 0.008 vs. 0.18 ± 0.009). At 8 weeks, the FA profile of the ACLT group was characterized with increased percentages of 20:4n-6 (0.44 ± 0.064 vs. 0.98 ± 0.339 mol-%) and 22:6n-3 (0.03 ± 0.014 vs. 0.07 ± 0.015 mol-%) and with decreased monounsaturated FA (MUFA) sums (37.19 ± 1.586 vs. 33.20 ± 1.068 mol-%) and n-3/n-6 PUFA ratios (0.20 ± 0.008 vs. 0.17 ± 0.008). The FA signature of the contralateral knees resembled that of the unoperated controls in most aspects, but had increased proportions of total n-3 PUFA and reduced MUFA sums. Conclusions These findings provide novel information on the effects of early OA on the infrapatellar FA profile in the rabbit ACLT model. The reduction in the n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio of the IFP is in concordance with the inflammation and cartilage degradation in early OA and could contribute to disease pathogenesis.
  • Lehtovirta, S.; Mäkitie, R. E.; Casula, V.; Haapea, M.; Niinimäki, J.; Niinimäki, T.; Peuna, A.; Lammentausta, E.; Mäkitie, O.; Nieminen, M.T. (2019)
    Objective: WNT signaling is of key importance in chondrogenesis and defective WNT signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and other cartilage diseases. Biochemical composition of articular cartilage in patients with aberrant WNT signaling has not been studied. Our objective was to assess the knee articular cartilage in WNT1 mutation-positive individuals using a 3.0T MRI unit to measure cartilage thickness, relaxation times, and texture features. Design: Cohort comprised mutation-positive (N = 13; age 17-76 years) and mutation-negative (N = 13; 16-77 years) subjects from two Finnish families with autosomal dominant WNT1 osteoporosis due to a heterozygous missense mutation c.652T>G (p.C218G) in WNT1. All subjects were imaged with a 3.0T MRI unit and assessed for cartilage thickness, T2 and T1 rho relaxation times, and T2 texture features contrast, dissimilarity and homogeneity of T2 relaxation time maps in six regions of interest (ROIs) in the tibiofemoral cartilage. Results: All three texture features showed opposing trends with age between the groups in the medial tibiofemoral cartilage (P = 0.020-0.085 for the difference of the regression coefficients), the mutation-positive individuals showing signs of cartilage preservation. No significant differences were observed in the lateral tibiofemoral cartilage. Cartilage thickness and means of T2 relaxation time did not differ between groups. Means of T1r relaxation time were significantly different in one ROI but the regression analysis displayed no differences. Conclusions: Our results show less age-related cartilage deterioration in the WNT1 mutation-positive than the mutation-negative subjects. This suggests, that the WNT1 mutation may alter cartilage turnover and even have a potential cartilage-preserving effect. (C) 2019 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Nieminen, Heikki J.; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Rahunen, Krista; Salmi, Ari; Saarakkala, Simo; Serimaa, Ritva; Haeggstrom, Edward (2015)
    There is no cure for osteoarthritis. Current drug delivery relies on systemic delivery or injections into the joint. Because articular cartilage (AC) degeneration can be local and drug exposure outside the lesion can cause adverse effects, localized drug delivery could permit new drug treatment strategies. We investigated whether intense megahertz ultrasound (frequency: 1.138 MHz, peak positive pressure: 2.7 MPa, I-spta: 5 W/cm(2), beam width: 5.7 mm at -6 dB, duty cycle: 5%, pulse repetition frequency: 285 Hz, mechanical index: 1.1) can deliver agents into AC without damaging it. Using ultrasound, we delivered a drug surrogate down to a depth corresponding to 53% depth of the AC thickness without causing histologically detectable damage to the AC. This may be important because early osteoarthritis typically exhibits histopathologic changes in the superficial AC. In conclusion, we identify intense megahertz ultrasound as a technique that potentially enables localized non-destructive delivery of osteoarthritis drugs or drug carriers into articular cartilage. (E-mail: heikki.nieminen@helsinki.fi) (C) 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology.
  • Nieminen, H. J.; Ylitalo, T.; Karhula, S.; Suuronen, J. -P.; Kauppinen, S.; Serimaa, R.; Haeggstrom, E.; Pritzker, K. P. H.; Valkealahti, M.; Lehenkari, P.; Finnila, M.; Saarakkala, S. (2015)
    Objective: Collagen distribution within articular cartilage (AC) is typically evaluated from histological sections, e.g., using collagen staining and light microscopy (LM). Unfortunately, all techniques based on histological sections are time-consuming, destructive, and without extraordinary effort, limited to two dimensions. This study investigates whether phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), two collagen-specific markers and X-ray absorbers, could (1) produce contrast for AC X-ray imaging or (2) be used to detect collagen distribution within AC. Method: We labeled equine AC samples with PTA or PMA and imaged them with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) at pre-defined time points 0, 18, 36, 54, 72, 90, 180, 270 h during staining. The micro-CT image intensity was compared with collagen distributions obtained with a reference technique, i.e., Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FTIRI). The labeling time and contrast agent producing highest association (Pearson correlation, BlandeAltman analysis) between FTIRI collagen distribution and micro-CT -determined PTA distribution was selected for human AC. Results: Both, PTA and PMA labeling permitted visualization of AC features using micro-CT in non-calcified cartilage. After labeling the samples for 36 h in PTA, the spatial distribution of X-ray attenuation correlated highly with the collagen distribution determined by FTIRI in both equine (mean +/- S.D. of the Pearson correlation coefficients, r = 0.96 +/- 0.03, n = 12) and human AC (r = 0.82 +/- 0.15, n = 4). Conclusions: PTA-induced X-ray attenuation is a potential marker for non-destructive detection of AC collagen distributions in 3D. This approach opens new possibilities in development of non-destructive 3D histopathological techniques for characterization of OA. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd and Osteoarthritis Research Society International.
  • Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Käkelä, Reijo; Lehenkari, Petri; Huhtakangas, Johanna; Turunen, Sanna; Joukainen, Antti; Kaariainen, Tommi; Paakkonen, Tommi; Kroger, Heikki; Nieminen, Petteri (2019)
    Background: Infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) has recently emerged as a potential source of inflammation in knee arthropathies. It has been proposed to be one source of adipocytokines, fatty acids (FA), and FA-derived lipid mediators that could contribute to the pathophysiological processes in the knee joint. Alterations in synovial fluid (SF) lipid composition have been linked to both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to compare the FA signatures in the IFP and SF of RA and OA patients. Methods: Pairs of IFP and SF samples were collected from the same knees of RA (n=10) and OA patients (n=10) undergoing total joint replacement surgery. Control SF samples (n=6) were harvested during diagnostic or therapeutic arthroscopic knee surgery unrelated to RA or OA. The FA composition in the total lipids of IFP and SF was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection. Results: Arthropathies resulted in a significant reduction in the SF proportions of n-6 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA), more pronouncedly in OA than in RA. OA was also characterized with reduced percentages of 22:6n-3 and lower product/precursor ratios of n-3 PUFA. The proportions of total monounsaturated FA increased in both RA and OA SF. Regarding IFP, RA patients had lower proportions of 20:4n-6, total n-6 PUFA, and 22:6n-3, as well as lower product/precursor ratios of n-3 PUFA compared to OA patients. The average chain length of SF FA decreased in both diagnoses and the double bond index in OA. Conclusions: The observed complex alterations in the FA signatures could have both contributed to but also limited the inflammatory processes and cartilage destruction in the RA and OA knees.
  • Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Käkelä, Reijo; Lehenkari, Petri; Huhtakangas, Johanna; Turunen, Sanna; Joukainen, Antti; Kääriäinen, Tommi; Paakkonen, Tommi; Kröger, Heikki; Nieminen, Petteri (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) has recently emerged as a potential source of inflammation in knee arthropathies. It has been proposed to be one source of adipocytokines, fatty acids (FA), and FA-derived lipid mediators that could contribute to the pathophysiological processes in the knee joint. Alterations in synovial fluid (SF) lipid composition have been linked to both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to compare the FA signatures in the IFP and SF of RA and OA patients. Methods Pairs of IFP and SF samples were collected from the same knees of RA (n = 10) and OA patients (n = 10) undergoing total joint replacement surgery. Control SF samples (n = 6) were harvested during diagnostic or therapeutic arthroscopic knee surgery unrelated to RA or OA. The FA composition in the total lipids of IFP and SF was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection. Results Arthropathies resulted in a significant reduction in the SF proportions of n-6 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA), more pronouncedly in OA than in RA. OA was also characterized with reduced percentages of 22:6n-3 and lower product/precursor ratios of n-3 PUFA. The proportions of total monounsaturated FA increased in both RA and OA SF. Regarding IFP, RA patients had lower proportions of 20:4n-6, total n-6 PUFA, and 22:6n-3, as well as lower product/precursor ratios of n-3 PUFA compared to OA patients. The average chain length of SF FA decreased in both diagnoses and the double bond index in OA. Conclusions The observed complex alterations in the FA signatures could have both contributed to but also limited the inflammatory processes and cartilage destruction in the RA and OA knees.
  • Waller, Benjamin; Munukka, Matti; Multanen, Juhani; Rantalainen, Timo; Poyhonen, Tapani; Nieminen, Miika T.; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Kautiainen, Hannu; Selanne, Harri; Dekker, Joost; Sipila, Sarianna; Kujala, Urho M.; Hakkinen, Arja; Heinonen, Ari (2013)
  • Waller, B.; Munukka, M.; Rantalainen, T.; Lammentausta, E.; Nieminen, M. T.; Kiviranta, I.; Kautiainen, H.; Hakkinen, A.; Kujala, U. M.; Heinonen, A. (2017)
    Objective: To investigate the effects of 4-months intensive aquatic resistance training on body composition and walking speed in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis (OA), immediately after intervention and after 12-months follow-up. Additionally, influence of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) will be investigated. Design: This randomised clinical trial assigned eighty-seven volunteer postmenopausal women into two study arms. The intervention group (n = 43) participated in 48 supervised intensive aquatic resistance training sessions over 4-months while the control group (n = 44) maintained normal physical activity. Eighty four participants continued into the 12-months' follow-up period. Body composition was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Walking speed over 2 km and the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) were measured. LTPA was recorded with self-reported diaries. Results: After the 4-month intervention there was a significant decrease (P = 0.002) in fat mass (mean change: -1.17 kg; 95% CI: -2.00 to -0.43) and increase (P = 0.002) in walking speed (0.052 m/s; 95% CI: 0.018 to 0.086) in favour of the intervention group. Body composition returned to baseline after 12-months. In contrast, increased walking speed was maintained (0.046 m/s; 95% CI 0.006 to 0.086, P = 0.032). No change was seen in lean mass or KOOS. Daily LTPA over the 16-months had a significant effect (P = 0.007) on fat mass loss (f(2) = 0.05) but no effect on walking speed. Conclusions: Our findings show that high intensity aquatic resistance training decreases fat mass and improves walking speed in post-menopausal women with mild knee OA. Only improvements in walking speed were maintained at 12-months follow-up. Higher levels of LTPA were associated with fat mass loss. (C) 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Munukka, M.; Waller, B.; Rantalainen, T.; Hakkinen, A.; Nieminen, M. T.; Lammentausta, E.; Kujala, U. M.; Paloneva, J.; Sipila, S.; Peuna, A.; Kautiainen, H.; Selanne, H.; Kiviranta, I.; Heinonen, A. (2016)
    Objective: To study the efficacy of aquatic resistance training on biochemical composition of tibiofemoral cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Eighty seven volunteer postmenopausal women, aged 60-68 years, with mild knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grades I/II and knee pain) were recruited and randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 43) and control (n = 44) group. The intervention group participated in 48 supervised aquatic resistance training sessions over 16 weeks while the control group maintained usual level of physical activity. The biochemical composition of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral cartilage was estimated using single-slice transverse relaxation time (T2) mapping and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC index). Secondary outcomes were cardiorespiratory fitness, isometric knee extension and flexion force and knee injury and OA outcome (KOOS) questionnaire. Results: After 4-months aquatic training, there was a significant decrease in both T2 -1.2 ms (95% confidence interval (CI): -2.3 to -0.1, P = 0.021) and dGEMRIC index -23 ms (-43 to -3, P = 0.016) in the training group compared to controls in the full thickness posterior region of interest (ROI) of the medial femoral cartilage. Cardiorespiratory fitness significantly improved in the intervention group by 9.8% (P = 0.010). Conclusions: Our results suggest that, in postmenopausal women with mild knee OA, the integrity of the collagen-interstitial water environment (T2) of the tibiofemoral cartilage may be responsive to low shear and compressive forces during aquatic resistance training. More research is required to understand the exact nature of acute responses in dGEMRIC index to this type of loading. Further, aquatic resistance training improves cardiorespiratory fitness. (C) 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Anturaniemi (o.s. Roine), Johanna; Sankari, Satu; Griinari, Mikko; Atroshi, Faik; Ounjaijean, Sakaewan; Hielm-Bjorkman, Anna Katrina (2016)
    Background: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of disease, and the antioxidant physiological effect of omega-3 from fish oil may lead to improvement of canine spontaneous osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: In this prospective randomized, controlled, double-blinded study, we assessed haematological and biochemical parameters in dogs with OA following supplementation with either a concentrated omega-3 deep sea fish oil product or corn oil. Blood samples from 77 client-owned dogs diagnosed as having OA were taken before (baseline) and 16 weeks after having orally ingested 0.2 ml/Kg bodyweight/day of deep sea fish oil or corn oil. Circulating malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI), free carnitine (Free-Car), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), and serum fatty acids, haemograms and serum biochemistry were evaluated. Differences within and between groups from baseline to end, were analysed using repeated samples T-test or Wilcoxon rank test and independent samples T-test or a Mann-Whitney test. Results: Supplementation with fish oil resulted in a significant reduction from day 0 to day 112 in MDA (from 3.41 +/- 1.34 to 2.43 +/- 0.92 mu mol/L; P <0.001) and an elevation in Free-Car (from 18.18 +/- 9.78 to 21.19 +/- 9.58 mu mol/L; P = 0.004) concentrations, whereas dogs receiving corn oil presented a reduction in MDA (from 3.41 +/- 1.34 to 2.41 +/- 1.01 mu mol/L; P = 0.001) and NTBI (from -1.25 +/- 2.17 to -2.31 +/- 1.64 mu mol/L; P = 0.002). Both groups showed increased (albeit not significantly) GSH and 8-OH-dG blood values. Dogs supplemented with fish oil had a significant reduction in the proportions of monocytes (from 3.84 +/- 2.50 to 1.77 +/- 1.92 %; P = 0.030) and basophils (from 1.47 +/- 1.22 to 0.62 +/- 0.62 %; P = 0.012), whereas a significant reduction in platelets counts (from 316.13 +/- 93.83 to 288.41 +/- 101.68 x 10(9)/L; P = 0.029), and an elevation in glucose (from 5.18 +/- 0.37 to 5.32 +/- 0.47 mmol/L; P = 0.041) and cholesterol (from 7.13 +/- 1.62 to 7.73 +/- 2.03 mmol/L; P = 0.011) measurements were observed in dogs receiving corn oil. Conclusions: In canine OA, supplementation with deep sea fish oil improved diverse markers of oxidative status in the dogs studied. As corn oil also contributed to the reduction in certain oxidative markers, albeit to a lesser degree, there was no clear difference between the two oil groups. No clinical, haematological or biochemical evidence of side effects emerged related to supplementation of either oil. Although a shift in blood fatty acid values was apparent due to the type of nutraceutical product given to the dogs, corn oil seems not to be a good placebo.
  • Wang, Yafei; Yu, Dongsheng; Liu, Zhiming; Zhou, Fang; Dai, Jun; Wu, Bingbing; Zhou, Jing; Heng, Boon C; Zou, Xiao H; Ouyang, Hongwei; Liu, Hua (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis (OA) has been widely investigated, but the mechanisms are still unclear. Exosomes that serve as carriers of genetic information have been implicated in many diseases and are known to participate in many physiological processes. Here, we investigate the therapeutic potential of exosomes from human embryonic stem cell-induced mesenchymal stem cells (ESC-MSCs) in alleviating osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Exosomes were harvested from conditioned culture media of ESC-MSCs by a sequential centrifugation process. Primary mouse chondrocytes treated with interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) were used as an in vitro model to evaluate the effects of the conditioned medium with or without exosomes and titrated doses of isolated exosomes for 48 hours, prior to immunocytochemistry or western blot analysis. Destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery was performed on the knee joints of C57BL/6 J mice as an OA model. This was followed by intra-articular injection of either ESC-MSCs or their exosomes. Cartilage destruction and matrix degradation were evaluated with histological staining and OARSI scores at the post-surgery 8 weeks. Results We found that intra-articular injection of ESC-MSCs alleviated cartilage destruction and matrix degradation in the DMM model. Further in vitro studies illustrated that this effect was exerted through ESC-MSC-derived exosomes. These exosomes maintained the chondrocyte phenotype by increasing collagen type II synthesis and decreasing ADAMTS5 expression in the presence of IL-1β. Immunocytochemistry revealed colocalization of the exosomes and collagen type II-positive chondrocytes. Subsequent intra-articular injection of exosomes derived from ESC-MSCs successfully impeded cartilage destruction in the DMM model. Conclusions The exosomes from ESC-MSCs exert a beneficial therapeutic effect on OA by balancing the synthesis and degradation of chondrocyte extracellular matrix (ECM), which in turn provides a new target for OA drug and drug-delivery system development.
  • Mikkola, Lea; Holopainen, Saila; Pessa-Morikawa, Tiina; Lappalainen, Anu K; Hytönen, Marjo K; Lohi, Hannes; Iivanainen, Antti (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis continue to be prevalent problems in veterinary and human medicine. Canine hip dysplasia is particularly problematic as it massively affects several large-sized breeds and can cause a severe impairment of the quality of life. In Finland, the complex condition is categorized to five classes from normal to severe dysplasia, but the categorization includes several sub-traits: congruity of the joint, Norberg angle, subluxation degree of the joint, shape and depth of the acetabulum, and osteoarthritis. Hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis have been proposed to have separate genetic etiologies. Results Using Fédération Cynologique Internationale -standardized ventrodorsal radiographs, German shepherds were rigorously phenotyped for osteoarthritis, and for joint incongruity by Norberg angle and femoral head center position in relation to dorsal acetabular edge. The affected dogs were categorized into mild, moderate and severe dysplastic phenotypes using official hip scores. Three different genome-wide significant loci were uncovered. The strongest candidate genes for hip joint incongruity were noggin (NOG), a bone and joint developmental gene on chromosome 9, and nanos C2HC-type zinc finger 1 (NANOS1), a regulator of matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) on chromosome 28. Osteoarthritis mapped to a long intergenic region on chromosome 1, between genes encoding for NADPH oxidase 3 (NOX3), an intriguing candidate for articular cartilage degradation, and AT-rich interactive domain 1B (ARID1B) that has been previously linked to joint laxity. Conclusions Our findings highlight the complexity of canine hip dysplasia phenotypes. In particular, the results of this study point to the potential involvement of specific and partially distinct loci and genes or pathways in the development of incongruity, mild dysplasia, moderate-to-severe dysplasia and osteoarthritis of canine hip joints. Further studies should unravel the unique and common mechanisms for the various sub-traits.
  • Mikkola, Lea; Holopainen, Saila; Pessa-Morikawa, Tiina; Lappalainen, Anu K.; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Lohi, Hannes; Iivanainen, Antti (2019)
    Background Hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis continue to be prevalent problems in veterinary and human medicine. Canine hip dysplasia is particularly problematic as it massively affects several large-sized breeds and can cause a severe impairment of the quality of life. In Finland, the complex condition is categorized to five classes from normal to severe dysplasia, but the categorization includes several sub-traits: congruity of the joint, Norberg angle, subluxation degree of the joint, shape and depth of the acetabulum, and osteoarthritis. Hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis have been proposed to have separate genetic etiologies. Results Using Federation Cynologique Internationale -standardized ventrodorsal radiographs, German shepherds were rigorously phenotyped for osteoarthritis, and for joint incongruity by Norberg angle and femoral head center position in relation to dorsal acetabular edge. The affected dogs were categorized into mild, moderate and severe dysplastic phenotypes using official hip scores. Three different genome-wide significant loci were uncovered. The strongest candidate genes for hip joint incongruity were noggin (NOG), a bone and joint developmental gene on chromosome 9, and nanos C2HC-type zinc finger 1 (NANOS1), a regulator of matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) on chromosome 28. Osteoarthritis mapped to a long intergenic region on chromosome 1, between genes encoding for NADPH oxidase 3 (NOX3), an intriguing candidate for articular cartilage degradation, and AT-rich interactive domain 1B (ARID1B) that has been previously linked to joint laxity. Conclusions Our findings highlight the complexity of canine hip dysplasia phenotypes. In particular, the results of this study point to the potential involvement of specific and partially distinct loci and genes or pathways in the development of incongruity, mild dysplasia, moderate-to-severe dysplasia and osteoarthritis of canine hip joints. Further studies should unravel the unique and common mechanisms for the various sub-traits.
  • Kestilä, I.; Thevenot, J.; Finnilä, M. A.; Karhula, S. S.; Hadjab, I.; Kauppinen, S.; Garon, M.; Quenneville, E.; Haapea, M.; Rieppo, L.; Pritzker, K. P.; Buschmann, M. D.; Nieminen, H. J.; Saarakkala, S. (2018)
    Objective: The aims of this study were: to 1) develop a novel sample processing protocol to visualize human articular cartilage (AC) chondrons using micro-computed tomography (mu CT), 2) develop and validate an algorithm to quantify the chondron morphology in 3D, and 3) compare the differences in chondron morphology between intact and osteoarthritic AC. Method: The developed protocol is based on the dehydration of samples with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), followed by imaging with a desktop mCT. Chondron density and depth, as well as volume and sphericity, were calculated in 3D with a custom-made and validated algorithm employing semiautomatic chondron selection and segmentation. The quantitative parameters were analyzed at three AC depth zones (zone 1: 0-10%; zone 2: 10-40%; zone 3: 40-100%) and grouped by the OARSI histological grades (OARSI grades 0-1.0, n = 6; OARSI grades 3.0-3.5, n = 6). Results: After semi-automatic chondron selection and segmentation, 1510 chondrons were approved for 3D morphometric analyses. The chondrons especially in the deeper tissue (zones 2 and 3) were significantly larger (P Conclusion: We have developed a novel sample processing protocol for chondron imaging in 3D, as well as a high-throughput algorithm to semi-automatically quantify chondron/ chondrocyte 3D morphology in AC. Our results also suggest that 3D chondron morphology is affected by the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). (c) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Osteoarthritis Research Society International. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
  • Schrama, Johannes Cornelis; Fenstad, Anne M; Dale, Håvard; Havelin, Leif; Hallan, Geir; Overgaard, Soren; Pedersen, Alma B; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Pulkkinen, Pekka; Eskelinen, Antti; Mäkelä, Keijo; Engesaeter, Lars B; Fevang, Bjorg-Tilde (2015)
    Background and purpose - Medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, including immune modulation. We investigated the risk of revision for infection after primary total hip replacement (THR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis over a 16-year period, and compared it with that in THR patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods - We identified 13,384 THRs in RA patients and 377,287 THRs in OA patients from 1995 through 2010 in a dataset from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Kaplan-Meier survival curves, with revision for infection as the endpoint, were constructed. Cox regression analyses were performed to calculate the relative risk (RR) of revision for infection adjusted for age, sex, fixation technique, and year of primary surgery. Results - RA patients had a 1.3 times (95% CI 1.0-1.6) higher risk of revision for infection. After 2001, this risk increased more for RA patients than for OA patients. During the first 3 months and from 8 years postoperatively, the risk of revision for infection was higher in RA patients with THRs fixated with antibiotic-loaded cement than in corresponding OA patients. Interpretation - We found a slightly higher overall risk of revision for infection in RA patients than in OA patients, but this difference was only present after 2001. In THRs with antibiotic-loaded cement, the risk of very early and late infections leading to revision was higher in RA patients than in OA patients.
  • Julkunen, Heikki; Lohman, Martina (2019)
    Nivelrustoissa ja niveliä ympäröivissä rakenteissa esiintyvät kalsiumpyrofosfaatti (CPP) -kertymät ovat yleisiä iäkkäillä. Akuutissa artriitissa CPP-kiteet välittävät reumaattisen tulehduksen. Krooninen CPP-artropatia voi olla nivelrikon tai seronegatiivisen polyartriitin kaltainen. Tukirangan ja pehmytkudosten CPP-kertymät saattavat aiheuttaa yllättäviä taudinkuvia. Hoidossa voidaan käyttää tulehduskipulääkkeitä, kortikosteroideja, kolkisiinia, hydroksiklorokiinia, metotreksaattia ja interleukiini-1:n salpaajia.