Browsing by Subject "PALLIATIVE CARE"

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  • Kokkonen, Kristiina; Tasmuth, Tiina; Lehto, Juho T.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Elme, Anneli; Jaaskelainen, Anna-Stina; Saarto, Tiina (2019)
    Background/Aim: To observe changes in symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over 7 years among cancer patients at different stages of the disease. Patients and Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study at the Helsinki University Hospital Cancer Center, was carried out in 2006 and repeated in 2013. All participants filled in the EORTC-QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Results: Altogether, 581 patients responded (49% in 2006 and 54% in 2013). The disease was local in 51% and advanced in 49% of patients. The HRQoL was significantly lower, except for emotional and cognitive functions, and the symptom burden more severe in advanced cancer. The most prevalent symptoms were fatigue (93% and 85%; moderate/severe 22% and 9%), pain (65% and 47%; moderate/severe 16% and 5%), and insomnia (64% and 60%; moderate/severe 20 and 21%), respectively. No changes in HRQoL or symptoms were found at 7 years. Conclusion: There is a need for early integrated palliative care to improve HRQoL during cancer treatments.
  • Rantsi, Mervi; Pitkälä, Kaisu H.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Hyttinen, Virva; Kankaanpää, Eila (2022)
    Background Educational interventions can reduce potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use in older people. Their effectiveness has been measured mainly as changes in PIM use. In this economic evaluation, we analyse the impact of an educational intervention in terms of costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Methods The educational intervention consisted of activating and interactive training sessions for nursing staff and consulting physicians, and was compared with treatment as usual (TAU). Participants (n = 227) in a cluster randomised trial (cRCT) were residents living permanently in assisted living facilities (n = 20 wards). For economic evaluation, participants' healthcare service use costs and costs for the intervention were estimated for a 12 month period. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated for QALYs per participant. Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted from a healthcare perspective. A bootstrapped cost-effectiveness plane and one-way sensitivity analysis were undertaken to analyse the uncertainty surrounding the estimates. Results The educational intervention was estimated to be less costly and less effective in terms of QALYs than TAU at the 12 month follow-up [incremental costs -euro1,629, confidence interval (CI) -euro5,489 to euro2,240; incremental effect -0.02, CI -0.06 to 0.02]. The base case ICER was >euro80,000/QALY. Conclusion The educational intervention was estimated to be less costly and less effective in terms of QALYs compared with TAU, but the results are subject to some uncertainties. Reduction in PIM use or benefits in quality of life did not seem to translate into improvements in QALYs. Our findings emphasise the need for better understanding of the impact of decreasing PIM use on health outcomes.
  • Hakola, Outi (2021)
    Background: The 21st century has seen a proliferation of end-of-life documentary films and television documentaries that contribute to building a public image of hospice and palliative care. The way in which terminally ill patients are represented in these documentaries creates impressions of who is welcomed to receive end-of-life care. These documentary representations have not been previously mapped. Methods: Using quantitative content analysis, I analyzed 35 contemporary Western documentaries and studied their diversity in the representations. I focused on terminally ill patients who are given time and space in the narration to voice their views about the end-of-life process. I paid attention to such elements as gender, race and ethnicity, age, class, religion and sexuality. Results: The documentaries welcomed the representations and voices of terminally ill people. Class, religion and sexuality often had a marginal role in narration. The gender diversity of the representations was quite balanced. Regarding age, the documentaries preferred stories about working age patients for dramatic purposes, yet all age groups were represented. However, the documentaries had an identifiable racial and ethnic bias. With a few exceptions, terminally ill who had a personal voice in the narrations were white. In comparison, racial and ethnic minorities were either absent from most of the documentaries, or their role was limited to illustrations of the general story. Conclusions: End-of-life documentaries provide identifiable access to the patients’ experiences and as such they provide emotionally and personally engaging knowledge about hospice and palliative care. While these representations are people-oriented, they include racial disparities and they focus mostly on the experiences of white terminally ill patients. This bias reinforces the misleading image of hospice and palliative care as a racialized healthcare service.
  • Beets, Geerard; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Arnold, Dirk; Beishon, Marc; Crul, Mirjam; Dekker, Jan Willem; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Flejou, Jean-Francois; Grisold, Wolfgang; Henning, Geoffrey; Laghi, Andrea; Lovey, Jozsef; Negrouk, Anastassia; Pereira, Philippe; Roca, Pierre; Saarto, Tiina; Seufferlein, Thomas; Taylor, Claire; Ugolini, Giampaolo; van de Velde, Cornelis; van Herck, Bert; Yared, Wendy; Costa, Alberto; Naredi, Peter (2017)
    Background: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are checklists and explanations of organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific tumour type. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Colorectal cancer: essential requirements for quality care Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer death in Europe and has wide variation in outcomes among countries. Increasing numbers of older people are contracting the disease, and treatments for advanced stages are becoming more complex. A growing number of survivors also require specialist support. High-quality care can only be a carried out in specialised CRC units or centres which have both a core multidisciplinary team and an extended team of allied professionals, and which are subject to quality and audit procedures. Such units or centres are far from universal in all European countries. It is essential that, to meet European aspirations for comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations implement the essential requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis, to treatment, to survivorship. Conclusion: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality CRC service. The ECCO expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary units or centres must be guaranteed for all those with CRC. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Wouters, Michel W.; Michielin, Olivier; Bastiaannet, Esther; Beishon, Marc; Catalano, Orlando; del Marmol, Veronique; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Dendale, Remi; Trill, Maria Die; Ferrari, Andrea; Forsea, Ana-Maria; Kreckel, Hannelore; Lövey, Jozsef; Luyten, Gre; Massi, Daniela; Mohr, Peter; Oberst, Simon; Pereira, Philippe; Paiva Prata, Joao Paulo; Rutkowski, Piotr; Saarto, Tiina; Sheth, Sapna; Spurrier-Bernard, Gilly; Vuoristo, Meri-Sisko; Costad, Alberto; Naredi, Peter (2018)
    Background ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are explanations and descriptions of challenges, organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific type of cancer. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Melanoma: essential requirements for quality care: Melanoma, the most-deadly skin cancer, is rising in incidence among fair-skinned people in Europe. Increasing complexity of care for advanced disease in clinical areas such as staging and new therapies requires attention to a number of challenges and inequalities in a diverse patient group. Care for advanced melanoma must only be carried out in, or in collaboration with, specialist melanoma centres which have both a core multidisciplinary team and an extended team of allied professionals, and which are subject to quality and audit procedures. Access to such units is far from universal in all European countries. It is essential that, to meet European aspirations for high-quality comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations implement the requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis to treatment and follow-up, to improve survival and quality of life for patients. Conclusion: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality service for melanoma. The ERQCC expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary teams and specialised treatments is guaranteed to all patients with melanoma.
  • Allum, William; Lordick, Florian; Alsina, Maria; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Beishon, Marc; Braga, Marco; Caballero, Carmela; Carneiro, Fatima; Cassinello, Fernando; Dekker, Jan Willem; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Haustermans, Karin; Henning, Geoffrey; Hutter, Bettina; Lovey, Jozsef; Netikova, Irena Stenglova; Oberrnannova, Radka; Oberst, Simon; Rostoft, Siri; Saarto, Tiina; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sheth, Sapna; Wynter-Blyth, Venetia; Costa, Alberto; Naredi, Peter Z. (2018)
    Background: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are checklists and explanations of organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific type of cancer. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Oesophageal and gastric: essential requirements for quality care: Oesophageal and gastric (OG) cancers are a challenging tumour group with a poor prognosis and wide variation in outcomes among European countries. Increasing numbers of older people are contracting the diseases, and treatments and care pathways are becoming more complex in both curative and palliative settings. High-quality care can only be a carried out in specialised OG cancer units or centres which have both a core multidisciplinary team and an extended team of allied professionals, and which are subject to quality and audit procedures. Such units or centres are far from universal in all European countries. It is essential that, to meet European aspirations for comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations implement the essential requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis, to treatment, to survivorship. Conclusion: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality OG cancer service. The ERQCC expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary units or centres must be guaranteed for all those with OG cancer.
  • Brausi, Maurizio; Hoskin, Peter; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Banks, Ian; Beishon, Marc; Boyle, Helen; Colecchia, Maurizio; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Hoeckel, Michael; Leonard, Kay; Loevey, Jozsef; Maroto, Pablo; Mastris, Ken; Medeiros, Rui; Naredi, Peter; Oyen, Raymond; de Reijke, Theo; Selby, Peter; Saarto, Tiina; Valdagni, Riccardo; Costa, Alberto; Poortmans, Philip (2020)
    Background ECCO Essential Requirements for Quality Cancer Care (ERQCC) are written by experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care in Europe. They give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of essential care throughout the patient journey. Prostate cancer Prostate cancer is the second most common male cancer and has a wide variation in outcomes in Europe. It has complex diagnosis and treatment challenges, and is a major healthcare burden. Care must only be a carried out in prostate/urology cancer units or centres that have a core multidisciplinary team (MDT) and an extended team of health professionals. Such units are far from universal in European countries. To meet European aspirations for comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations must consider the requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis, to treatment, to survivorship.
  • Andritsch, Elisabeth; Beishon, Marc; Bielack, Stefan; Bonvalot, Sylvie; Casali, Paolo; Crul, Mirjam; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Donatih, Davide Maria; Douis, Hassan; Haas, Rick; Hogendoorn, Pancras; Kozhaeva, Olga; Lavender, Verna; Lovey, Jozsef; Negrouk, Anastassia; Pereira, Philippe; Roca, Pierre; de Lempdes, Godelieve Rochette; Saarto, Tiina; van Berck, Bert; Vassal, Gilles; Wartenberg, Markus; Yared, Wendy; Costa, Alberto; Naredi, Peter (2017)
    Background: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are checklists and explanations of organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific tumour type. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Sarcoma: essential requirements for quality care Sarcomas - which can be classified into soft tissue and bone sarcomas - are rare, but all rare cancers make up more than 20% of cancers in Europe, and there are substantial inequalities in access to high-quality care. Sarcomas, of which there are many subtypes, comprise a particularly complex and demanding challenge for healthcare systems and providers. This paper presents essential requirements for quality cancer care of soft tissue sarcomas in adults and bone sarcomas. High-quality care must only be carried out in specialised sarcoma centres (including paediatric cancer centres) which have both a core multidisciplinary team and an extended team of allied professionals, and which are subject to quality and audit procedures. Access to such units is far from universal in all European countries. It is essential that, to meet European aspirations for high-quality comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations implement the requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis and follow-up, to treatment, to improve survival and quality of life for patients. Conclusion: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality service for soft tissue sarcomas in adults and bone sarcomas. The ECCO expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary teams is guaranteed to all patients with sarcoma. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Rajala, Kaisa; Lehto, Juho T.; Saarinen, M.; Sutinen, E.; Saarto, T.; Myllarniemi, M. (2016)
    Background: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease with median survival from 2 to 7 years. Palliative care is an important part of patients' care as lung transplantation is not an option for the majority of patients. The aim of this study was to describe treatment practices, decision-making and symptoms during end-of-life care of IPF patients. Methods: We identified 59 deceased patients from a national prospective IPF cohort study (FinnishIPF) and analyzed retrospectively their health care documentation during the 6 months that preceded death. Results: Hospital was the place of death for 47 patients (80 %). A majority of the patients (93 %) were hospitalized for a mean of 30 days (range 1-96 days) during the last 6 months of their life. Altogether, patients spent 15 % of their last 6 months of life in a hospital. End-of-life decisions and do not resuscitate (DNR) orders were made for 19 (32 %) and 34 (57 %) of the patients, respectively, and 22 (42 %) of these decisions were made Conclusions: The majority of IPF patients died in a hospital with ongoing life-prolonging procedures until death. The frequent use of opioids is an indicator of an intention to relieve symptoms, but end-of-life decisions were still made very late. Early integrated palliative care with advance care plan could improve the end-of-life care of dying IPF patients.
  • Mroueh, R.; Haapaniemi, A.; Saarto, T.; Grönholm, L.; Grénman, R.; Salo, T.; Mäkitie, A. A. (2019)
    PurposeLate-stage OTSCC is associated with poor overall survival (OS). Non-curative treatment approach aims to improve quality of life and prolong survival of patients deemed incurable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the used non-curative treatment modalities for OTSSC and patient survival.MethodsAll patients diagnosed with OTSCC and treated with non-curative intent at the HUS Helsinki University Hospital (Helsinki, Finland) during the 12-year period of 2005-2016 were included. Survival analysis after the non-curative treatment decision was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method in this population-based study.ResultsEighty-two patients were identified. A non-curative treatment decision was made at presentation without any previous treatment in 26 patients (7% of all patients diagnosed with OTSCC during the study period). Palliative radiotherapy was administered to 24% of all patients. The average survival time after the non-curative treatment decision was 3.7months (median 2 and range 0-26).ConclusionsDue to the short mean survival time after decision for treatment with non-curative intent, and the notable symptom burden in this patient population, a prompt initiation of all non-curative measures is warranted.
  • Lamppu, Pauli J; Pitkälä, Kaisu (2021)
    Objectives: The aim was to review evidence from all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using palliative care education or staff training as an intervention to improve nursing home residents' quality of life (QOL) or quality of dying (QOD) or to reduce burdensome hospitalizations. Design: A systematic review with a narrative summary. Setting and Participants: Residents in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar, references of known articles, previous reviews, and recent volumes of key journals. RCTs were included in the review. Methodologic quality was assessed. Results: The search yielded 932 articles after removing the duplicates. Of them, 16 cluster RCTs fulfilled inclusion criteria for analysis. There was a great variety in the interventions with respect to learning methods, intensity, complexity, and length of staff training. Most interventions featured other elements besides staff training. In the 6 high-quality trials, only 1 showed a reduction in hospitalizations, whereas among 6 moderate-quality trials 2 suggested a reduction in hospitalizations. None of the high-quality trials showed effects on residents' QOL or QOD. Staff reported an improved QOD in 1 moderatequality trial. Conclusions and Implications: Irrespective of the means of staff training, there were surprisingly few effects of education on residents' QOL, QOD, or burdensome hospitalizations. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons behind these findings. (C) 2020 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.
  • Biganzoli, Laura; Cardoso, Fatima; Beishon, Marc; Cameron, David; Cataliotti, Luigi; Coles, Charlotte E.; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C.; Trill, Maria Die; Erdem, Sema; Fjell, Maria; Geiss, Romain; Goossens, Mathijs; Kuhl, Christiane; Marotti, Lorenza; Naredi, Peter; Oberst, Simon; Palussière, Jean; Ponti, Antonio; Rosselli del Turco, Marco; Rubio, Isabel T.; Sapino, Anna; Senkus-Konefka, Elzbieta; Sheth, Sapna; Skelin, Marko; Sousa, Berta; Saarto, Tiina; Costa, Alberto; Poortmans, Philip (2020)
    Abstract This article is an update of the requirements of a specialist breast centre, produced by EUSOMA and endorsed by ECCO as part of Essential Requirements for Quality Cancer Care (ERQCC) programme, and ESMO. To meet aspirations for comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations must consider the requirements in this article, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis, to treatment, to survivorship.