Browsing by Subject "PATHWAY"

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  • Clement, Cristina C.; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chalmers, Samantha; Furtado, Raquel; Spada, Sheila; Mondanelli, Giada; Ianni, Federica; Gehrke, Sarah; Gargaro, Marco; Manni, Giorgia; Lopez Cara, Luisa Carlota; Runge, Peter; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Karaman, Sinem; Arasa, Jorge; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Ruben; Beck, Amanda; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gadina, Massimo; Halin, Cornelia; Fallarino, Francesca; Skobe, Mihaela; Veldhoen, Marc; Moretti, Simone; Formenti, Silvia; Demaria, Sandra; Soni, Rajesh K.; Galarini, Roberta; Sardella, Roccaldo; Lauvau, Gregoire; Putterman, Chaim; Alitalo, Kari; Grohmann, Ursula; Santambrogio, Laura (2021)
    Tryptophan catabolism is a major metabolic pathway utilized by several professional and non-professional antigen presenting cells to maintain immunological tolerance. Here we report that 3-hydroxy-l-kynurenamine (3-HKA) is a biogenic amine produced via an alternative pathway of tryptophan metabolism. In vitro, 3-HKA has an anti-inflammatory profile by inhibiting the IFN-gamma mediated STAT1/NF-kappa Beta pathway in both mouse and human dendritic cells (DCs) with a consequent decrease in the release of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, most notably TNF, IL-6, and IL12p70. 3-HKA has protective effects in an experimental mouse model of psoriasis by decreasing skin thickness, erythema, scaling and fissuring, reducing TNF, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma, and IL-17 production, and inhibiting generation of effector CD8(+) T cells. Similarly, in a mouse model of nephrotoxic nephritis, besides reducing inflammatory cytokines, 3-HKA improves proteinuria and serum urea nitrogen, overall ameliorating immune-mediated glomerulonephritis and renal dysfunction. Overall, we propose that this biogenic amine is a crucial component of tryptophan-mediated immune tolerance. 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenamine (3-HKA) is a metabolite deriving from a lateral pathway of tryptophan catabolism. Here the authors identify 3-HKA as a biogenic amine and show it has anti-inflammatory properties that can protect mice against psoriasis and nephrotoxic nephritis.
  • Gu, Ying; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Napolitano, Nicole; Clemens, McKenzie; Zhang, Yazhou; Sorsa, Timo; Zhang, Yu; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M. (2013)
  • Escala-Garcia, M.; Abraham, J.; Andrulis, I.L.; Anton-Culver, H.; Arndt, V.; Ashworth, A.; Auer, P.L.; Auvinen, P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Beesley, J.; Behrens, S.; Benitez, J.; Bermisheva, M.; Blomqvist, C.; Blot, W.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Bojesen, S.E.; Bolla, M.K.; Børresen-Dale, A.-L.; Brauch, H.; Brenner, H.; Brucker, S.Y.; Burwinkel, B.; Caldas, C.; Canzian, F.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chanock, S.J.; Chin, S.-F.; Clarke, C.L.; Couch, F.J.; Cox, A.; Cross, S.S.; Czene, K.; Daly, M.B.; Dennis, J.; Devilee, P.; Dunn, J.A.; Dunning, A.M.; Dwek, M.; Earl, H.M.; Eccles, D.M.; Eliassen, A.H.; Ellberg, C.; Evans, D.G.; Fasching, P.A.; Figueroa, J.; Flyger, H.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Gapstur, S.M.; García-Closas, M.; García-Sáenz, J.A.; Gaudet, M.M.; George, A.; Giles, G.G.; Goldgar, D.E.; González-Neira, A.; Grip, M.; Guénel, P.; Guo, Q.; Haiman, C.A.; Håkansson, N.; Hamann, U.; Harrington, P.A.; Hiller, L.; Hooning, M.J.; Hopper, J.L.; Howell, A.; Huang, C.-S.; Huang, G.; Hunter, D.J.; Jakubowska, A.; John, E.M.; Kaaks, R.; Kapoor, P.M.; Keeman, R.; Kitahara, C.M.; Koppert, L.B.; Kraft, P.; Kristensen, V.N.; Lambrechts, D.; Le Marchand, L.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Lindblom, A.; Lubiński, J.; Mannermaa, A.; Manoochehri, M.; Manoukian, S.; Margolin, S.; Martinez, M.E.; Maurer, T.; Mavroudis, D.; Meindl, A.; Milne, R.L.; Mulligan, A.M.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Newman, W.G.; Olshan, A.F.; Olson, J.E.; Olsson, H.; Orr, N.; Peterlongo, P.; Petridis, C.; Prentice, R.L.; Presneau, N.; Punie, K.; Ramachandran, D.; Rennert, G.; Romero, A.; Sachchithananthan, M.; Saloustros, E.; Sawyer, E.J.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Schwentner, L.; Scott, C.; Simard, J.; Sohn, C.; Southey, M.C.; Swerdlow, A.J.; Tamimi, R.M.; Tapper, W.J.; Teixeira, M.R.; Terry, M.B.; Thorne, H.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Tomlinson, I.; Troester, M.A.; Truong, T.; Turnbull, C.; Vachon, C.M.; van der Kolk, L.E.; Wang, Q.; Winqvist, R.; Wolk, A.; Yang, X.R.; Ziogas, A.; Pharoah, P.D.P.; Hall, P.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Bader, G.D.; Dörk, T.; Easton, D.F.; Canisius, S.; Schmidt, M.K. (2020)
    Identifying the underlying genetic drivers of the heritability of breast cancer prognosis remains elusive. We adapt a network-based approach to handle underpowered complex datasets to provide new insights into the potential function of germline variants in breast cancer prognosis. This network-based analysis studies similar to 7.3 million variants in 84,457 breast cancer patients in relation to breast cancer survival and confirms the results on 12,381 independent patients. Aggregating the prognostic effects of genetic variants across multiple genes, we identify four gene modules associated with survival in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and one in ER-positive disease. The modules show biological enrichment for cancer-related processes such as G-alpha signaling, circadian clock, angiogenesis, and Rho-GTPases in apoptosis.
  • Su, Jing; Ekman, Carl; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Lahti, Leo; Ström, Kristoffer; Brazma, Alvis; Groop, Leif; Rung, Johan; Hansson, Ola (2015)
    Background: Although high-throughput studies of gene expression have generated large amounts of data, most of which is freely available in public archives, the use of this valuable resource is limited by computational complications and non-homogenous annotation. To address these issues, we have performed a complete re-annotation of public microarray data from human skeletal muscle biopsies and constructed a muscle expression compendium consisting of nearly 3000 samples. The created muscle compendium is a publicly available resource including all curated annotation. Using this data set, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of muscle aging and to describe how physical exercise may alleviate negative physiological effects. Results: We find 957 genes to be significantly associated with aging (p <0.05, FDR = 5 %, n = 361). Aging was associated with perturbation of many central metabolic pathways like mitochondrial function including reduced expression of genes in the ATP synthase, NADH dehydrogenase, cytochrome C reductase and oxidase complexes, as well as in glucose and pyruvate processing. Among the genes with the strongest association with aging were H3 histone, family 3B (H3F3B, p = 3.4 x 10(-13)), AHNAK nucleoprotein, desmoyokin (AHNAK, p = 6.9 x 10(-12)), and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4, p = 4.0 x 10(-9)). We also discover genes previously not linked to muscle aging and metabolism, such as fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 2 (FEZ2, p = 2.8 x 10(-8)). Out of the 957 genes associated with aging, 21 (p <0.001, false discovery rate = 5 %, n = 116) were also associated with maximal oxygen consumption (VO2MAX). Strikingly, 20 out of those 21 genes are regulated in opposite direction when comparing increasing age with increasing VO2MAX. Conclusions: These results support that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major age-related factor and also highlight the beneficial effects of maintaining a high physical capacity for prevention of age-related sarcopenia.
  • Intl Multiple Sclerosis Genetics; Madireddy, Lohith; Patsopoulos, Niklaos A.; Palotie, Aarno (2019)
    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 50,000 unique associations with common human traits. While this represents a substantial step forward, establishing the biology underlying these associations has proven extremely difficult. Even determining which cell types and which particular gene(s) are relevant continues to be a challenge. Here, we conduct a cell-specific pathway analysis of the latest GWAS in multiple sclerosis (MS), which had analyzed a total of 47,351 cases and 68,284 healthy controls and found more than 200 non-MHC genome-wide associations. Our analysis identifies pan immune cell as well as cell-specific susceptibility genes in T cells, B cells and monocytes. Finally, genotype-level data from 2,370 patients and 412 controls is used to compute intraindividual and cell-specific susceptibility pathways that offer a biological interpretation of the individual genetic risk to MS. This approach could be adopted in any other complex trait for which genome-wide data is available.
  • Livson, Sivan; Jarva, Hanna; Kalliala, Ilkka; Lokki, A. Inkeri; Heikkinen-Eloranta, Jenni; Nieminen, Pekka; Meri, Seppo (2021)
    Background Human pregnancy alters profoundly the immune system. The local involvement and mechanisms of activation of the complement system in the cervicovaginal milieu during pregnancy and delivery remain unexplored. Objectives To determine whether normal pregnancy and delivery are associated with local activation of complement or changes in the immunoglobulin profile in the cervix. Study Design This study was designed to assess IgA, IgG, and complement activation in the cervicovaginal area in three groups of patients: i) 49 pregnant women (week 41+3-42+0) not in active labor, ii) 24 women in active labor (38+4-42+2), and iii) a control group of nonpregnant women (n=23) at child-bearing age. We collected mucosal samples from the lateral fornix of the vagina and external cervix during routine visits and delivery. The Western blot technique was used to detect complement C3 and its activation products. For semiquantitative analysis, the bands of the electrophoresed proteins in gels were digitized on a flatbed photo scanner and analyzed. IgA and IgG were analyzed by Western blotting and quantified by ELISA. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Comparison tests were used for statistical comparisons. Results A higher abundance but lower activation level of C3 in both the external cervix (P Conclusions Our results reveal an unexpectedly strong activation of the complement system and the presence IgG immunoglobulins in the cervicovaginal area during pregnancy, active labor, and among nonpregnant women. In contrast to the higher amounts of C3 in the cervicovaginal secretions during labor, its activation level was lower. Complement activating IgG was detected in higher concentrations than IgA in the mucosal secretions during pregnancy and labor. Taken together our results imply the presence a locally operating humoral immune system in the cervicovaginal mucosa.
  • Mäkitie, Riikka E.; Hackl, Matthias; Niinimäki, Riitta; Kakko, Sakari; Grillari, Johannes; Mäkitie, Outi (2018)
    Context: WNT signaling is fundamental to bone health, and its aberrant activation leads to skeletal pathologies. The heterozygous missense mutation p.C218G in WNT1, a key WNT pathway ligand, leads to severe early-onset and progressive osteoporosis with multiple peripheral and spinal fractures. Despite the severe skeletal manifestations, conventional bone turnover markers are normal in mutation-positive patients. Objective: This study sought to explore the circulating microRNA (miRNA) pattern in patients with impaired WNT signaling. Design and Setting: A cross-sectional cohort study at a university hospital. Participants: Altogether, 12 mutation-positive (MP) subjects (median age, 39 years; range, 11 to 76 years) and 12 mutation-negative (MN) subjects (35 years; range, 9 to 59 years) from two Finnish families with WNT1 osteoporosis due to the heterozygous p.C218G WNT1 mutation. Methods and Main Outcome Measure: Serum samples were screened for 192 miRNAs using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Findings were compared between WNT1 MP and MN subjects. Results: The pattern of circulating miRNAs was significantly different in the MP subjects compared with the MN subjects, with two upregulated (miR-18a-3p and miR-223-3p) and six downregulated miRNAs (miR-22-3p, miR-31-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-143-5p, miR-423-5p, and miR-423-3p). Three of these (miR-22-3p, miR-34a-5p, and miR-31-5p) are known inhibitors of WNT signaling: miR-22-3p and miR-34a-5p target WNT1 messenger RNA, and miR-31-5p is predicted to bind to WNT1 3'UTR. Conclusions: The circulating miRNA pattern reflects WNT1 mutation status. The findings suggest that the WNT1 mutation disrupts feedback regulation between these miRNAs and WNT1, providing insights into the pathogenesis of WNT-related bone disorders. These miRNAs may have potential in the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis.
  • El-Khoury, Riyad; Dufour, Eric; Rak, Malgorzata; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Grandchamp, Nicolas; Csaba, Zsolt; Duvillie, Bertrand; Benit, Paule; Gallego, Jorge; Gressens, Pierre; Sarkis, Chamsy; Jacobs, Howard T.; Rustin, Pierre (2013)
  • Lokki, A. Inkeri; Kaartokallio, Tea; Holmberg, Ville; Onkamo, Paivi; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Villa, Pia M.; Hiltunen, Leena; Laivuori, Hannele; Meri, Seppo (2017)
    Preeclampsia (PE) is a common vascular disease of pregnancy with genetic predisposition. Dysregulation of the complement system has been implicated, but molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, we determined the potential linkage of severe PE to the most central complement gene, C3. Three cohorts of Finnish patients and controls were recruited for a genetic case-control study. Participants were genotyped using Sequenom genotyping and Sanger sequencing. Initially, we studied 259 Finnish patients with severe PE and 426 controls from the Southern Finland PE and the Finnish population-based PE cohorts. We used a custom-made single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay consisting of 98 SNPs in 18 genes that encode components of the complement system. Following the primary screening, C3 was selected as the candidate gene and consequently Sanger sequenced. Fourteen SNPs from C3 were also genotyped by a Sequenom panel in 960 patients with severe PE and 705 controls, including already sequenced individuals. Three of the 43 SNPs observed within C3 were associated with severe PE: rs2287845 (p = 0.038, OR = 1.158), rs366510 (p = 0.039, OR = 1.158), and rs2287848 (p = 0.041, OR = 1.155). We also discovered 16 SNP haplotypes with extreme linkage disequilibrium in the middle of the gene with a protective (p = 0.044, OR = 0.628) or a predisposing (p = 0.011, OR = 2.110) effect to severe PE depending on the allele combination. Genetic variants associated with PE are located in key domains of C3 and could thereby influence the function of C3. This is, as far as we are aware, the first candidate gene in the complement system with an association to a clinically relevant PE subphenotype, severe PE. The result highlights a potential role for the complement system in the pathogenesis of PE and may help in defining prognostic and therapeutic subgroups of preeclamptic women.
  • Chu, Man; Li, Taotao; Shen, Bin; Cao, Xudong; Zhong, Haoyu; Zhang, Luqing; Zhou, Fei; Ma, Wenjuan; Jiang, Haijuan; Xie, Pancheng; Liu, Zhengzheng; Dong, Ningzheng; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xu, Guoqiang; Lu, Peirong; Luo, Jincai; Wu, Qingyu; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young; Adams, Ralf H.; He, Yulong (2016)
    Mechanisms underlying the vein development remain largely unknown. Tie2 signaling mediates endothelial cell (EC) survival and vascular maturation and its activating mutations are linked to venous malformations. Here we show that vein formation are disrupted in mouse skin and mesentery when Tie2 signals are diminished by targeted deletion of Tek either ubiquitously or specifically in embryonic ECs. Postnatal Tie2 attenuation resulted in the degeneration of newly formed veins followed by the formation of haemangioma-like vascular tufts in retina and venous tortuosity. Mechanistically, Tie2 insufficiency compromised venous EC identity, as indicated by a significant decrease of COUP-TFII protein level, a key regulator in venogenesis. Consistently, angiopoietin-1 stimulation increased COUP-TFII in cultured ECs, while Tie2 knockdown or blockade of Tie2 downstream PI3K/Akt pathway reduced COUP-TFII which could be reverted by the proteasome inhibition. Together, our results imply that Tie2 is essential for venous specification and maintenance via Akt mediated stabilization of COUP-TFII.
  • Jantti, Maria H.; Talman, Virpi; Räsänen, Kati; Tarvainen, Ilari; Koistinen, Hannu; Tuominen, Raimo K. (2018)
    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Although it has a relatively high 5-year survival rate, development of resistance to standard androgen-deprivation therapy is a significant clinical problem. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. The protein kinase C (PKC) family is a putative prostate cancer drug target, but so far no PKC-targeting drugs are available for clinical use. By contrast to the standard approach of developing PKC inhibitors, we have developed isophthalate derivatives as PKC agonists. In this study, we have characterized the effects of the most potent isophthalate, 5-(hydroxymethyl) isophthalate 1a3 (HMI-1a3), on three prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, DU145, and PC3) using both 2D and 3D cell culture models. In 2D cell culture, HMI-1a3 reduced cell viability or proliferation in all cell lines as determined by the metabolic activity of the cells (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay) and thymidine incorporation. However, the mechanism of action in LNCaP cells was different to that in DU145 or PC3 cells. In LNCaP cells, HMI-1a3 induced a PKC-dependent activation of caspase 3/7, indicating an apoptotic response, whereas in DU145 and PC3 cells, it induced senescence, which was independent of PKC. This was observed as typical senescent morphology, increased beta-galactosidase activity, and upregulation of the senescence marker p21 and downregulation of E2F transcription factor 1. Using a multicellular spheroid model, we further showed that HMI-1a3 affects the growth of LNCaP and DU145 cells in a 3D culture, emphasizing its potential as a lead compound for cancer drug development.
  • Pekkala, Satu; Keskitalo, Anniina; Kettunen, Emilia; Lensu, Sanna; Nykänen, Noora; Kuopio, Teijo; Ritvos, Olli; Hentilä, Jaakko; Nissinen, Tuuli A.; Hulmi, Juha J. (2019)
    Colorectal cancer (CRC) and cachexia are associated with the gut microbiota and microbial surface molecules. We characterized the CRC-associated microbiota and investigated whether cachexia affects the microbiota composition. Further, we examined the possible relationship between the microbial surface molecule flagellin and CRC. CRC cells (C26) were inoculated into mice. Activin receptor (ACVR) ligands were blocked, either before tumor formation or before and after, to increase muscle mass and prevent muscle loss. The effects of flagellin on C26-cells were studied in vitro. The occurrence of similar phenomena were studied in murine and human tumors. Cancer modulated the gut microbiota without consistent effects of blocking the ACVR ligands. However, continued treatment for muscle loss modified the association between microbiota and weight loss. Several abundant microbial taxa in cancer were flagellated. Exposure of C26-cells to flagellin increased IL6 and CCL2/MCP-1 mRNA and IL6 excretion. Murine C26 tumors expressed more IL6 and CCL2/MCP-1 mRNA than C26-cells, and human CRC tumors expressed more CCL2/MCP-1 than healthy colon sites. Additionally, flagellin decreased caspase-1 activity and the production of reactive oxygen species, and increased cytotoxicity in C26-cells. Conditioned media from flagellin-treated C26-cells deteriorated C2C12-myotubes and decreased their number. In conclusion, cancer increased flagellated microbes that may promote CRC survival and cachexia by inducing inflammatory proteins such as MCP-1. Cancer-associated gut microbiota could not be rescued by blocking ACVR ligands.
  • Leikas, Juuso V.; Kohtala, Samuel; Theilmann, Wiebke; Jalkanen, Aaro J.; Forsberg, Markus M.; Rantamaki, Tomi (2017)
    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder primarily affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. The link between heightened activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK313) and neurodegenerative processes has encouraged investigation into the potential disease-modifying effects of novel GSK3 beta inhibitors in experimental models of PD. Therefore, the intriguing ability of several anesthetics to readily inhibit GSK3 beta within the cortex and hippocampus led us to investigate the effects of brief isoflurane anesthesia on striatal GSK3 beta signaling in nave rats and in a rat model of early-stage PD. Deep but brief (20-min) isoflurane anesthesia exposure increased the phosphorylation of GSK3 beta at the inhibitory Ser9 residue, and induced phosphorylation of AKT(Thr308) (protein kinase B; negative regulator of GSK3 beta) in the striatum of naive rats and rats with unilateral striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. The 6-OHDA protocol produced gradual functional deficiency within the nigrostriatal pathway, reflected as a preference for using the limb ipsilateral to the lesioned striatum at 2 weeks post 6-OHDA. Interestingly, such motor impairment was not observed in animals exposed to four consecutive isoflurane treatments (20-min anesthesia every 48 h; treatments started 7 days after 6-OHDA delivery). However, isoflurane had no effect on striatal or nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker of dopaminergic neurons) protein levels. This brief report provides promising results regarding the therapeutic potential and neurobiological mechanisms of anesthetics in experimental models of PD and guides development of novel disease-modifying therapies.
  • Piran, Mehran; Karbalaei, Reza; Piran, Mehrdad; Aldahdooh, Jehad; Mirzaie, Mehdi; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Tang, Jing; Jafari, Mohieddin (2020)
    Studying relationships among gene products by expression profile analysis is a common approach in systems biology. Many studies have generalized the outcomes to the different levels of central dogma information flow and assumed a correlation of transcript and protein expression levels. However, the relation between the various types of interaction (i.e., activation and inhibition) of gene products to their expression profiles has not been widely studied. In fact, looking for any perturbation according to differentially expressed genes is the common approach, while analyzing the effects of altered expression on the activity of signaling pathways is often ignored. In this study, we examine whether significant changes in gene expression necessarily lead to dysregulated signaling pathways. Using four commonly used and comprehensive databases, we extracted all relevant gene expression data and all relationships among directly linked gene pairs. We aimed to evaluate the ratio of coherency or sign consistency between the expression level as well as the causal relationships among the gene pairs. Through a comparison with random unconnected gene pairs, we illustrate that the signaling network is incoherent, and inconsistent with the recorded expression profile. Finally, we demonstrate that, to infer perturbed signaling pathways, we need to consider the type of relationships in addition to gene-product expression data, especially at the transcript level. We assert that identifying enriched biological processes via differentially expressed genes is limited when attempting to infer dysregulated pathways.
  • Contu, Lara; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Domanski, Michal; Uldry, Anne-Christine; Muhlemann, Oliver (2021)
    The positive-sense, single-stranded RNA alphaviruses pose a potential epidemic threat. Understanding the complex interactions between the viral and the host cell proteins is crucial for elucidating the mechanisms underlying successful virus replication strategies and for developing specific antiviral interventions. Here we present the first comprehensive protein-protein interaction map between the proteins of Semliki Forest Virus (SFV), a mosquito-borne member of the alphaviruses, and host cell proteins. Among the many identified cellular interactors of SFV proteins, the enrichment of factors involved in translation and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) was striking, reflecting the virus' hijacking of the translation machinery and indicating viral countermeasures for escaping NMD by inhibiting NMD at later time points during the infectious cycle. In addition to observing a general inhibition of NMD about 4 hours post infection, we also demonstrate that transient expression of the SFV capsid protein is sufficient to inhibit NMD in cells, suggesting that the massive production of capsid protein during the SFV reproduction cycle is responsible for NMD inhibition. Author summary To take over control of the host cell and ensure its own replication, viral proteins do interact with a plethora of host cell proteins. Elucidating these viral-host cell protein interactions is therefore key for understanding the mechanisms that a virus applies to successfully hijack the host cell. This study provides the first comprehensive protein-protein interaction map between the proteins of Semliki Forest Virus (SFV), a positive-strand, single-stranded RNA virus of the alphavirus family. While we previously discovered that the host cell recognizes and degrades the incoming viral genomic RNA by a cellular quality control system called Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD), our interactome study now led to uncovering of the other side of this arms race between SFV and the infected cells: We show in this study that the viral capsid protein has the capacity to inhibit NMD.
  • Menden, Michael P.; Wang, Dennis; Mason, Mike J.; Szalai, Bence; Bulusu, Krishna C.; Guan, Yuanfang; Yu, Thomas; Kang, Jaewoo; Jeon, Minji; Wolfinger, Russ; Nguyen, Tin; Zaslavskiy, Mikhail; Abante, Jordi; Abecassis, Barbara Schmitz; Aben, Nanne; Aghamirzaie, Delasa; Aittokallio, Tero; Akhtari, Farida S.; Al-lazikani, Bissan; Alam, Tanvir; Allam, Amin; Allen, Chad; de Almeida, Mariana Pelicano; Altarawy, Doaa; Alves, Vinicius; Amadoz, Alicia; Anchang, Benedict; Antolin, Albert A.; Ash, Jeremy R.; Aznar, Victoria Romeo; Ba-alawi, Wail; Bagheri, Moeen; Bajic, Vladimir; Ball, Gordon; Ballester, Pedro J.; Baptista, Delora; Bare, Christopher; Bateson, Mathilde; Bender, Andreas; Bertrand, Denis; Wijayawardena, Bhagya; Boroevich, Keith A.; Bosdriesz, Evert; Bougouffa, Salim; Bounova, Gergana; Brouwer, Thomas; Bryant, Barbara; Calaza, Manuel; Calderone, Alberto; Calza, Stefano; Capuzzi, Stephen; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Carlin, Daniel; Carter, Hannah; Castagnoli, Luisa; Celebi, Remzi; Cesareni, Gianni; Chang, Hyeokyoon; Chen, Guocai; Chen, Haoran; Chen, Huiyuan; Cheng, Lijun; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Chicco, Davide; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Cho, Sunghwan; Choi, Daeseon; Choi, Jaejoon; Choi, Kwanghun; Choi, Minsoo; Cock, Martine De; Coker, Elizabeth; Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Cserzö, Miklós; Cubuk, Cankut; Curtis, Christina; Daele, Dries Van; Dang, Cuong C.; Dijkstra, Tjeerd; Dopazo, Joaquin; Draghici, Sorin; Drosou, Anastasios; Dumontier, Michel; Ehrhart, Friederike; Eid, Fatma-Elzahraa; ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; Elmarakeby, Haitham; van Engelen, Bo; Engin, Hatice Billur; de Esch, Iwan; Evelo, Chris; Falcao, Andre O.; Farag, Sherif; Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Fisch, Kathleen; Flobak, Asmund; Fornari, Chiara; Foroushani, Amir B. K.; Fotso, Donatien Chedom; Fourches, Denis; Friend, Stephen; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Gao, Feng; Gao, Xiaoting; Gerold, Jeffrey M.; Gestraud, Pierre; Ghosh, Samik; Gillberg, Jussi; Godoy-Lorite, Antonia; Godynyuk, Lizzy; Godzik, Adam; Goldenberg, Anna; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Gonen, Mehmet; de Graaf, Chris; Gray, Harry; Grechkin, Maxim; Guimera, Roger; Guney, Emre; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Han, Younghyun; Hase, Takeshi; He, Di; He, Liye; Heath, Lenwood S.; Hellton, Kristoffer H.; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Hidalgo, Marta R.; Hidru, Daniel; Hill, Steven M.; Hochreiter, Sepp; Hong, Seungpyo; Hovig, Eivind; Hsueh, Ya-Chih; Hu, Zhiyuan; Huang, Justin K.; Huang, R. Stephanie; Hunyady, László; Hwang, Jinseub; Hwang, Tae Hyun; Hwang, Woochang; Hwang, Yongdeuk; Isayev, Olexandr; Don’t Walk, Oliver Bear; Jack, John; Jahandideh, Samad; Ji, Jiadong; Jo, Yousang; Kamola, Piotr J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; Karacosta, Loukia; Karimi, Mostafa; Kaski, Samuel; Kazanov, Marat; Khamis, Abdullah M.; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kiani, Narsis A.; Kim, Allen; Kim, Jinhan; Kim, Juntae; Kim, Kiseong; Kim, Kyung; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Yunseong; Kirk, Paul D. W.; Kitano, Hiroaki; Klambauer, Gunter; Knowles, David; Ko, Melissa; Kohn-Luque, Alvaro; Kooistra, Albert J.; Kuenemann, Melaine A.; Kuiper, Martin; Kurz, Christoph; Kwon, Mijin; van Laarhoven, Twan; Laegreid, Astrid; Lederer, Simone; Lee, Heewon; Lee, Jeon; Lee, Yun Woo; Lepp_aho, Eemeli; Lewis, Richard; Li, Jing; Li, Lang; Liley, James; Lim, Weng Khong; Lin, Chieh; Liu, Yiyi; Lopez, Yosvany; Low, Joshua; Lysenko, Artem; Machado, Daniel; Madhukar, Neel; Maeyer, Dries De; Malpartida, Ana Belen; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Marabita, Francesco; Marchal, Kathleen; Marttinen, Pekka; Mason, Daniel; Mazaheri, Alireza; Mehmood, Arfa; Mehreen, Ali; Michaut, Magali; Miller, Ryan A.; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Modos, Dezso; Moerbeke, Marijke Van; Moo, Keagan; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Movva, Rajiv; Muraru, Sebastian; Muratov, Eugene; Mushthofa, Mushthofa; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Nakken, Sigve; Nath, Aritro; Neuvial, Pierre; Newton, Richard; Ning, Zheng; Niz, Carlos De; Oliva, Baldo; Olsen, Catharina; Palmeri, Antonio; Panesar, Bhawan; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Park, Jaesub; Park, Seonyeong; Park, Sungjoon; Pawitan, Yudi; Peluso, Daniele; Pendyala, Sriram; Peng, Jian; Perfetto, Livia; Pirro, Stefano; Plevritis, Sylvia; Politi, Regina; Poon, Hoifung; Porta, Eduard; Prellner, Isak; Preuer, Kristina; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Ramnarine, Ricardo; Reid, John E.; Reyal, Fabien; Richardson, Sylvia; Ricketts, Camir; Rieswijk, Linda; Rocha, Miguel; Rodriguez-Gonzalvez, Carmen; Roell, Kyle; Rotroff, Daniel; de Ruiter, Julian R.; Rukawa, Ploy; Sadacca, Benjamin; Safikhani, Zhaleh; Safitri, Fita; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Sauer, Sebastian; Schlichting, Moritz; Seoane, Jose A.; Serra, Jordi; Shang, Ming-Mei; Sharma, Alok; Sharma, Hari; Shen, Yang; Shiga, Motoki; Shin, Moonshik; Shkedy, Ziv; Shopsowitz, Kevin; Sinai, Sam; Skola, Dylan; Smirnov, Petr; Soerensen, Izel Fourie; Soerensen, Peter; Song, Je-Hoon; Song, Sang Ok; Soufan, Othman; Spitzmueller, Andreas; Steipe, Boris; Suphavilai, Chayaporn; Tamayo, Sergio Pulido; Tamborero, David; Tang, Jing; Tanoli, Zia-ur-Rehman; Tarres-Deulofeu, Marc; Tegner, Jesper; Thommesen, Liv; Tonekaboni, Seyed Ali Madani; Tran, Hong; Troyer, Ewoud De; Truong, Amy; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Turu, Gábor; Tzeng, Guang-Yo; Verbeke, Lieven; Videla, Santiago; Consortium, AstraZeneca-Sanger Drug Combination DREAM (2019)
    The effectiveness of most cancer targeted therapies is short-lived. Tumors often develop resistance that might be overcome with drug combinations. However, the number of possible combinations is vast, necessitating data-driven approaches to find optimal patient-specific treatments. Here we report AstraZeneca’s large drug combination dataset, consisting of 11,576 experiments from 910 combinations across 85 molecularly characterized cancer cell lines, and results of a DREAM Challenge to evaluate computational strategies for predicting synergistic drug pairs and biomarkers. 160 teams participated to provide a comprehensive methodological development and benchmarking. Winning methods incorporate prior knowledge of drug-target interactions. Synergy is predicted with an accuracy matching biological replicates for >60% of combinations. However, 20% of drug combinations are poorly predicted by all methods. Genomic rationale for synergy predictions are identified, including ADAM17 inhibitor antagonism when combined with PIK3CB/D inhibition contrasting to synergy when combined with other PI3K-pathway inhibitors in PIK3CA mutant cells.
  • Sonnenblick, Amir; Brohee, Sylvain; Fumagalli, Debora; Vincent, Delphine; Venet, David; Ignatiadis, Michail; Salgado, Roberto; Van den Eynden, Gert; Rothe, Francoise; Desmedt, Christine; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Joensuu, Heikki; Loi, Sherene; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos (2015)
    Background: The likelihood of recurrence in patients with breast cancer who have HER2-positive tumors is relatively high, although trastuzumab is a remarkably effective drug in this setting. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protein (STAT3), a transcription factor that is persistently tyrosine-705 phosphorylated (pSTAT3) in response to numerous oncogenic signaling pathways, activates downstream proliferative and anti-apoptotic pathways. We hypothesized that pSTAT3 expression in HER2-positive breast cancer will confer trastuzumab resistance. Methods: We integrated reverse phase protein array (RPPA) and gene expression data from patients with HER2-positive breast cancer treated with trastuzumab in the adjuvant setting. Results: We show that a pSTAT3-associated gene signature (pSTAT3-GS) is able to predict pSTAT3 status in an independent dataset (TCGA; AUC = 0.77, P = 0.02). This suggests that STAT3 induces a characteristic set of gene expression changes in HER2-positive cancers. Tumors characterized as high pSTAT3-GS were associated with trastuzumab resistance (log rank P = 0.049). These results were confirmed using data from the prospective, randomized controlled FinHer study, where the effect was especially prominent in HER2-positive estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors (interaction test P = 0.02). Of interest, constitutively activated pSTAT3 tumors were associated with loss of PTEN, elevated IL6, and stromal reactivation. Conclusions: This study provides compelling evidence for a link between pSTAT3 and trastuzumab resistance in HER2-positive primary breast cancers. Our results suggest that it may be valuable to add agents targeting the STAT3 pathway to trastuzumab for treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer.
  • Andalibi, Vafa; Hokkanen, Henri; Vanni, Simo (2019)
    Simulation of the cerebral cortex requires a combination of extensive domain-specific knowledge and efficient software. However, when the complexity of the biological system is combined with that of the software, the likelihood of coding errors increases, which slows model adjustments. Moreover, few life scientists are familiar with software engineering and would benefit from simplicity in form of a high-level abstraction of the biological model. Our primary aim was to build a scalable cortical simulation framework for personal computers. We isolated an adjustable part of the domain-specific knowledge from the software. Next, we designed a framework that reads the model parameters from comma-separated value files and creates the necessary code for Brian2 model simulation. This separation allows rapid exploration of complex cortical circuits while decreasing the likelihood of coding errors and automatically using efficient hardware devices. Next, we tested the system on a simplified version of the neocortical microcircuit proposed by Markram and colleagues (2015). Our results indicate that the framework can efficiently perform simulations using Python, C++, and GPU devices. The most efficient device varied with computer hardware and the duration and scale of the simulated system. The speed of Brian2 was retained despite an overlying layer of software. However, the Python and C++ devices inherited the single core limitation of Brian2. The CxSystem framework supports exploration of complex models on personal computers and thus has the potential to facilitate research on cortical networks and systems.
  • Casar-Borota, Olivera; Boldt, Henning Bünsow; Engstrom, Britt Eden; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Baussart, Bertrand; Bengtsson, Daniel; Berinder, Katarina; Ekman, Bertil; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Hoybye, Charlotte; Jorgensen, Jens Otto L.; Kolnes, Anders Jensen; Korbonits, Marta; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Lindsay, John R.; Loughrey, Paul Benjamin; Maiter, Dominique; Manojlovic-Gacic, Emilija; Pahnke, Jens; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Popovic, Vera; Ragnarsson, Oskar; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Scheie, David; Toth, Miklos; Villa, Chiara; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Kunicki, Jacek; Burman, Pia (2021)
    Context: Aggressive pituitary tumors (APTs) are characterized by unusually rapid growth and lack of response to standard treatment. About 1% to 2% develop metastases being classified as pituitary carcinomas (PCs). For unknown reasons, the corticotroph tumors are overrepresented among APTs and PCs. Mutations in the alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene, regulating chromatin remodeling and telomere maintenance, have been implicated in the development of several cancer types, including neuroendocrine tumors. Objective: To study ATRX protein expression and mutational status of the ATRX gene in APTs and PCs. Design: We investigated ATRX protein expression by using immunohistochemistry in 30 APTs and 18 PCs, mostly of Pit-1 and T-Pit cell lineage. In tumors lacking ATRX immunolabeling, mutational status of the ATRX gene was explored. Results: Nine of the 48 tumors (19%) demonstrated lack of ATRX immunolabelling with a higher proportion in patients with PCs (5/18; 28%) than in those with APTs (4/30;13%). Lack of ATRX was most common in the corticotroph tumors, 7/22 (32%), versus tumors of the Pit-1 lineage, 2/24 (8%). Loss-of-function ATRX mutations were found in all 9 ATRX immunonegative cases: nonsense mutations (n = 4), frameshift deletions (n = 4), and large deletions affecting 22-28 of the 36 exons (n = 3). More than 1 ATRX gene defect was identified in 2 PCs. Conclusion: ATRX mutations occur in a subset of APTs and are more common in corticotroph tumors. The findings provide a rationale for performing ATRX immunohistochemistry to identify patients at risk of developing aggressive and potentially metastatic pituitary tumors.