Browsing by Subject "PHANEROCHAETE-CHRYSOSPORIUM"

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  • Miyauchi, Shingo; Hage, Hayat; Drula, Elodie; Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Navarro, David; Favel, Anne; Chaduli, Delphine; Grisel, Sacha; Haon, Mireille; Piumi, Francois; Levasseur, Anthony; Lomascolo, Anne; Ahrendt, Steven; Barry, Kerrie; LaButti, Kurt M.; Chevret, Didier; Daum, Chris; Mariette, Jerome; Klopp, Christophe; Cullen, Daniel; de Vries, Ronald P.; Gathman, Allen C.; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Hilden, Kristiina S.; Kuees, Ursula; Lilly, Walt; Lipzen, Anna; Maekelae, Miia R.; Martinez, Angel T.; Morel-Rouhier, Melanie; Morin, Emmanuelle; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Ram, Arthur F. J.; Woesten, Han A. B.; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Riley, Robert; Record, Eric; Grigoriev, Igor; Rosso, Marie-Noelle (2020)
    White-rot (WR) fungi are pivotal decomposers of dead organic matter in forest ecosystems and typically use a large array of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes to deconstruct lignocellulose. However, the extent of lignin and cellulose degradation may vary between species and wood type. Here, we combined comparative genomics, transcriptomics and secretome proteomics to identify conserved enzymatic signatures at the onset of wood-decaying activity within the Basidiomycota genus Pycnoporus. We observed a strong conservation in the genome structures and the repertoires of protein-coding genes across the four Pycnoporus species described to date, despite the species having distinct geographic distributions. We further analysed the early response of P. cinnabarinus, P. coccineus and P. sanguineus to diverse (ligno)-cellulosic substrates. We identified a conserved set of enzymes mobilized by the three species for breaking down cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. The co-occurrence in the exo-proteomes of H2O2-producing enzymes with H2O2-consuming enzymes was a common feature of the three species, although each enzymatic partner displayed independent transcriptional regulation. Finally, cellobiose dehydrogenase-coding genes were systematically co-regulated with at least one AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase gene, indicative of enzymatic synergy in vivo. This study highlights a conserved core white-rot fungal enzymatic mechanism behind the wood-decaying process.
  • Oghenekaro, Abbot O.; Raffaello, Tommaso; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Asiegbu, Fred O. (2016)
    Background: The basidiomycete Rigidoporus microporus is a fungus that causes the white rot disease of the tropical rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, the major source of commercial natural rubber. Besides its lifestyle as a pathogen, the fungus is known to switch to saprotrophic growth on wood with the ability to degrade both lignin and cellulose. There is almost no genomic or transcriptomic information on the saprotrophic abilities of this fungus. In this study, we present the fungal transcriptomic profiles during saprotrophic growth on rubber wood. Results: A total of 266.6 million RNA-Seq reads were generated from six libraries of the fungus growing either on rubber wood or without wood. De novo assembly produced 34, 518 unigenes with an average length of 217(bp. Annotation of unigenes using public databases; GenBank, Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Gene Ontology (GO) produced 25, 880 annotated unigenes. Transcriptomic profiling analysis revealed that the fungus expressed over 300 genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes. Among these, 175 genes were up-regulated in rubber wood. These include three members of the glycoside hydrolase family 43, as well as various glycosyl transferases, carbohydrate esterases and polysaccharide lyases. A large number of oxidoreductases which includes nine manganese peroxidases were also significantly up-regulated in rubber wood. Several genes involved in fatty acid metabolism and degradation as well as natural rubber degradation were expressed in the transcriptome. Four genes (acyl-CoA synthetase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA acetyltransferase) potentially involved in rubber latex degradation pathway were also induced. A number of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters and hydrophobin genes were significantly expressed in the transcriptome during saprotrophic growth. Some genes related to energy metabolism were also induced. Conclusions: The analysed data gives an insight into the activation of lignocellulose breakdown machinery of R. microporus. This study also revealed genes with relevance in antibiotic metabolism (e.g. cephalosporin esterase) as well as those with potential applications in fatty acid degradation. This is the first study on the transcriptomic analysis of R. microporus on rubber wood and should serve as a pioneering resource for future studies of the fungus at the genomic or transcriptomic level.
  • Berg, Björn (2018)
    Decomposition of foliar litter may be complete or proceed at a progressively lower rate to become zero and a limit value for decomposition may be estimated. Limit values for decomposition have been found to range from 100% accumulated mass loss to 42%, resulting in 'stable' fractions of 0 and 58%, respectively. A limit value does not necessarily mean a complete stop in decomposition but litter mass loss may proceed at a very low rate. An asymptotic function is used to estimate limit value/stable fraction, separating a readily decomposed and a stable residue. The stabilized litter fraction defined as (100 - limit value)/100 may be used for estimating the accumulation rate of stable carbon (C) in organic layers.
  • Daly, Paul; Lopez, Sara Casado; Peng, Mao; Lancefield, Christopher S.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Kim, Young-Mo; Zink, Erika M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Singan, Vasanth R.; Lipzen, Anna; Dilworth, David; Wang, Mei; Ng, Vivian; Robinson, Errol; Orr, Galya; Baker, Scott E.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Hilden, Kristiina S.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Mäkelä, Miia R.; de Vries, Ronald P. (2018)
    White-rot fungi, such as Dichomitus squalens, degrade all wood components and inhabit mixed-wood forests containing both soft- and hardwood species. In this study, we evaluated how D. squalens responded to the compositional differences in softwood [guaiacyl (G) lignin and higher mannan content] and hardwood [syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) lignin and higher xylan content] using semi-natural solid cultures. Spruce (softwood) and birch (hardwood) sticks were degraded by D. squalens as measured by oxidation of the lignins using 2D-NMR. The fungal response as measured by transcriptomics, proteomics and enzyme activities showed a partial tailoring to wood composition. Mannanolytic transcripts and proteins were more abundant in spruce cultures, while a proportionally higher xylanolytic activity was detected in birch cultures. Both wood types induced manganese peroxidases to a much higher level than laccases, but higher transcript and protein levels of the manganese peroxidases were observed on the G-lignin rich spruce. Overall, the molecular responses demonstrated a stronger adaptation to the spruce rather than birch composition, possibly because D. squalens is mainly found degrading softwoods in nature, which supports the ability of the solid wood cultures to reflect the natural environment.
  • Choi, Jaeyoung; Detry, Nicolas; Kim, Ki-Tae; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Lee, Yong-Hwan (2014)
  • Mäkinen, Mari; Kuuskeri, Jaana; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Zeng, Zhen; Asiegbu, Fred; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Lundell, Taina (2019)
    Background The white rot fungus Phlebia radiata, a type species of the genus Phlebia, is an efficient decomposer of plant cell wall polysaccharides, modifier of softwood and hardwood lignin, and is able to produce ethanol from various waste lignocellulose substrates. Thus, P. radiata is a promising organism for biotechnological applications aiming at sustainable utilization of plant biomass. Here we report the genome sequence of P. radiata isolate 79 originally isolated from decayed alder wood in South Finland. To better understand the evolution of wood decay mechanisms in this fungus and the Polyporales phlebioid clade, gene content and clustering of genes encoding specific carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in seven closely related fungal species was investigated. In addition, other genes encoding proteins reflecting the fungal lifestyle including peptidases, transporters, small secreted proteins and genes involved in secondary metabolism were identified in the genome assembly of P. radiata. Results The PACBio sequenced nuclear genome of P. radiata was assembled to 93 contigs with 72X sequencing coverage and annotated, revealing a dense genome of 40.4 Mbp with approximately 14 082 predicted protein-coding genes. According to functional annotation, the genome harbors 209 glycoside hydrolase, 27 carbohydrate esterase, 8 polysaccharide lyase, and over 70 auxiliary redox enzyme-encoding genes. Comparisons with the genomes of other phlebioid fungi revealed shared and specific properties among the species with seemingly similar saprobic wood-decay lifestyles. Clustering of especially GH10 and AA9 enzyme-encoding genes according to genomic localization was discovered to be conserved among the phlebioid species. In P. radiata genome, a rich repertoire of genes involved in the production of secondary metabolites was recognized. In addition, 49 genes encoding predicted ABC proteins were identified in P. radiata genome together with 336 genes encoding peptidases, and 430 genes encoding small secreted proteins. Conclusions The genome assembly of P. radiata contains wide array of carbohydrate polymer attacking CAZyme and oxidoreductase genes in a composition identifiable for phlebioid white rot lifestyle in wood decomposition, and may thus serve as reference for further studies. Comparative genomics also contributed to enlightening fungal decay mechanisms in conversion and cycling of recalcitrant organic carbon in the forest ecosystems.
  • Lundell, Taina K.; Mäkelä, Miia R.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Hilden, Kristiina S. (Academic Press, 2014)
    Advances in Botanical Research
    Saprobic (saprotrophic and saprophytic) wood-decay fungi are in majority species belonging to the fungal phylum Basidiomycota, whereas saprobic plant litter-decomposing fungi are species of both the Basidiomycota and the second Dikarya phylum Ascomycota. Wood-colonizing white rot and brown rot fungi are principally polypore, gilled pleurotoid, or corticioid Basidiomycota species of the class Agaricomycetes, which also includes forest and grassland soil-inhabiting and litter-decomposing mushroom species. In this chapter, examples of lignocellulose degradation patterns are presented in the current view of genome sequencing and comparative genomics of fungal wood-decay enzymes. Specific attention is given to the model white rot fungus, lignin-degrading species Phanerochaete chrysosporium and its wood decay-related gene expression (transcriptomics) on lignocellulose substrates. Types of fungal decay patterns on wood and plant lignocellulose are discussed in the view of fungal lifestyle strategies. Potentiality of the plant biomass-decomposing Basidiomycota species, their secreted enzymes and respective lignocellulose-attacking genes is evaluated in regard to development of biotechnological and industrial applications.
  • Esterhuizen, Maranda; Behman Sani, Shirin; Wang, Lin; Kim, Young Jun; Pflugmacher, Stephan (2021)
    Untreated pharmaceutical pollution and their possibly toxic metabolites, resulting from overloaded wastewater treatment processes, end up in aquatic environments and are hazardous to the ecosystem homeostasis. Biological wastewater remediation could supplement traditional methods and overcome the release of these biologically active compounds in the environment. Mycoremediation is especially promising due to the unspecific nature of fungi to decompose compounds through exoenzymes and the uptake of compounds as nutrients. In the present study, we improved on the previous advances made using the fungus Mucor hiemalis to remediate one of the most commonly occurring pharmaceuticals, acetaminophen (APAP), at higher concentrations. The limitation of nitrogen, adjustment of pH, and comparison to, as well as co-cultivation with the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were tested. Nitrogen limitation did not significantly improve the APAP remediation efficiency of M. hiemalis. Maintaining the pH of the media improved the remediation restraint of 24 h previously observed. The APAP remediation efficiency of P. chrysosporium was far superior to that of M. hiemalis, and co-cultivation of the two resulted in a decreased remediation efficiency compared to P. chrysosporium in single.
  • Makela, Miia R.; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; de Vries, Ronald P.; Timonen, Sari; Hilden, Kristiina (2014)
  • Marinovic, Mila; Aguilar-Pontes, Maria Victoria; Zhou, Miaomiao; Miettinen, Otto Kullervo; de Vries, Ronald; Mäkelä, Miia Riitta; Hilden, Sari Kristiina (2018)
    The basidiomycete white-rot fungus Obba rivulosa, a close relative of Gelatoporia (Ceriporiopsis) subvermispora, is an efficient degrader of softwood. The dikaryotic O. rivulosa strain T241i (FBCC949) has been shown to selectively remove lignin from spruce wood prior to depolymerization of plant cell wall polysaccharides, thus possessing potential in biotechnological applications such as pretreatment of wood in pulp and paper industry. In this work, we studied the time-course of the conversion of spruce by the genome-sequenced monokaryotic O. rivulosa strain 3A-2, which is derived from the dikaryon T241i, to get insight into transcriptome level changes during prolonged solid state cultivation. During 8-week cultivation, O. rivulosa expressed a constitutive set of genes encoding putative plant cell wall degrading enzymes. High level of expression of the genes targeted towards all plant cell wall polymers was detected at 2-week time point, after which majority of the genes showed reduced expression. This implicated non-selective degradation of lignin by the O. rivulosa monokaryon and suggests high variation between mono- and dikaryotic strains of the white-rot fungi with respect to their abilities to convert plant cell wall polymers.