Browsing by Subject "PHASE-I TRIAL"

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  • Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Bauerschmitz, Gerd; Abo-Ramadan, Usama; Halavaara, Juha; Escutenaire, Sophie; Diaconu, Iulia; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli; Pesonen, Sari (2010)
  • Callegari, Elisa; Elamin, Bahaeldin K.; D'Abundo, Lucilla; Falzoni, Simonetta; Donvito, Giovanna; Moshiri, Farzaneh; Milazzo, Maddalena; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Giacomelli, Luciano; Fornari, Francesca; Hemminki, Akseli; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Gramantieri, Laura; Negrini, Massimo; Sabbioni, Silvia (2013)
  • Cerullo, Vincenzo; Capasso, Cristian; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Otto; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and it is the first approved virus-derived drug for treatment of cancer. As an oncolytic agent, it can induce lysis of infected cells, but it can also engage the immune system, promoting activation and maturation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In essence, oncolysis combined with the associated immunostimulatory actions result in a "personalized in situ vaccine" for each patient. In order to take full advantage of these features, we should try to understand how adenovirus interacts with the immune system, what are the receptors involved in triggering subsequent signals and which kind of responses they elicit. Tackling these questions will give us further insight in how to manipulate adenovirus-mediated immune responses for enhancement of anti-tumor efficacy. In this review, we first highlight how oncolytic adenovirus interacts with the innate immune system and its receptors such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors and other immune sensors. Then we describe the effect of these interactions on the adaptive immune system and its cells, especially B and T lymphocytes. Finally, we summarize the most significant preclinical and clinical results in the field of gene therapy where researchers have engineered adenovirus to manipulate the host immune system by expressing cytokines and signal-ingmediators.
  • Koski, Anniina; Karli, Eerika; Kipar, Anja; Escutenaire, Sophie; Kanerva, Anna-Maija; Hemminki, Akseli (2013)
  • Hemminki, Otto; dos Santos, Joao Manuel; Hemminki, Akseli (2020)
    In this review, we discuss the use of oncolytic viruses in cancer immunotherapy treatments in general, with a particular focus on adenoviruses. These serve as a model to elucidate how versatile viruses are, and how they can be used to complement other cancer therapies to gain optimal patient benefits. Historical reports from over a hundred years suggest treatment efficacy and safety with adenovirus and other oncolytic viruses. This is confirmed in more contemporary patient series and multiple clinical trials. Yet, while the first viruses have already been granted approval from several regulatory authorities, room for improvement remains. As good safety and tolerability have been seen, the oncolytic virus field has now moved on to increase efficacy in a wide array of approaches. Adding different immunomodulatory transgenes to the viruses is one strategy gaining momentum. Immunostimulatory molecules can thus be produced at the tumor with reduced systemic side effects. On the other hand, preclinical work suggests additive or synergistic effects with conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In addition, the newly introduced checkpoint inhibitors and other immunomodulatory drugs could make perfect companions to oncolytic viruses. Especially tumors that seem not to be recognized by the immune system can be made immunogenic by oncolytic viruses. Logically, the combination with checkpoint inhibitors is being evaluated in ongoing trials. Another promising avenue is modulating the tumor microenvironment with oncolytic viruses to allow T cell therapies to work in solid tumors. Oncolytic viruses could be the next remarkable wave in cancer immunotherapy.