Browsing by Subject "PHOTOSYNTHETICALLY ACTIVE RADIATION"

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  • Brelsford, Craig; Morales Suarez, Luis Orlando; Nezval, Jakub; Kotilainen, Titta Katariina; Hartikainen, Saara Maria; Aphalo, Pedro J.; Robson, Thomas Matthew (2019)
    We studied how plants acclimated to growing conditions that included combinations of blue light (BL) and ultraviolet (UV)-A radiation, and whether their growing environment affected their photosynthetic capacity during and after a brief period of acute high light (as might happen during an under-canopy sunfleck). Arabidopsis thaliana Landsberg erecta wild-type were compared with mutants lacking functional blue light and UV photoreceptors: phototropin 1, cryptochromes (CRY1 and CRY2) and UV RESISTANT LOCUS 8 (uvr8). This was achieved using light-emitting-diode (LED) lamps in a controlled environment to create treatments with or without BL, in a split-plot design with or without UV-A radiation. We compared the accumulation of phenolic compounds under growth conditions and after exposure to 30 min of high light at the end of the experiment (46 days), and likewise measured the operational efficiency of photosystem II (phi PSII, a proxy for photosynthetic performance) and dark-adapted maximum quantum yield (F-v/F-m to assess PSII damage). Our results indicate that cryptochromes are the main photoreceptors regulating phenolic compound accumulation in response to BL and UV-A radiation, and a lack of functional cryptochromes impairs photosynthetic performance under high light. Our findings also reveal a role for UVR8 in accumulating flavonoids in response to a low UV-A dose. Interestingly, phototropin 1 partially mediated constitutive accumulation of phenolic compounds in the absence of BL. Low-irradiance BL and UV-A did not improve phi PSII and F-v/F-m upon our acute high-light treatment; however, CRYs played an important role in ameliorating high-light stress.
  • Rai, Neha; Morales, Luis Orlando; Aphalo, Pedro Jose (2021)
    About 95% of the ultraviolet (UV) photons reaching the Earth's surface are UV-A (315-400 nm) photons. Plant responses to UV-A radiation have been less frequently studied than those to UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation. Most previous studies on UV-A radiation have used an unrealistic balance between UV-A, UV-B, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Consequently, results from these studies are difficult to interpret from an ecological perspective, leaving an important gap in our understanding of the perception of solar UV radiation by plants. Previously, it was assumed UV-A/blue photoreceptors, cryptochromes and phototropins mediated photomorphogenic responses to UV-A radiation and "UV-B photoreceptor" UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) to UV-B radiation. However, our understanding of how UV-A radiation is perceived by plants has recently improved. Experiments using a realistic balance between UV-B, UV-A, and PAR have demonstrated that UVR8 can play a major role in the perception of both UV-B and short-wavelength UV-A (UV-A(sw), 315 to similar to 350 nm) radiation. These experiments also showed that UVR8 and cryptochromes jointly regulate gene expression through interactions that alter the relative sensitivity to UV-B, UV-A, and blue wavelengths. Negative feedback loops on the action of these photoreceptors can arise from gene expression, signaling crosstalk, and absorption of UV photons by phenolic metabolites. These interactions explain why exposure to blue light modulates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B and UV-A(sw) radiation. Future studies will need to distinguish between short and long wavelengths of UV-A radiation and to consider UVR8's role as a UV-B/UV-A(sw) photoreceptor in sunlight.
  • Durand, Maxime; Matule, Baiba; Burgess, Alexandra J.; Robson, T. Matthew (2021)
    Light in canopies is highly dynamic since the strength and composition of incoming radiation is determined by the wind and the Sun's trajectory and by canopy structure. For this highly dynamic environment, we mathematically defined sunflecks as periods of high irradiance relative to the background light environment. They can account for a large proportion of the light available for photosynthesis. Based on high-frequency irradiance measurements with a CCD array spectroradiometer, we investigated how the frequency of measurement affects what we define as sunflecks. Do different plant canopies produce sunflecks with different properties? How does the spectral composition and strength of irradiance in the shade vary during a sunfleck? Our results suggest that high-frequency measurements improved our description of light fluctuations and led to the detection of shorter, more frequent and intense sunflecks. We found that shorter wind-induced sunflecks contribute most of the irradiance attributable to sunflecks, contrary to previous reports from both forests and crops. Large variations in sunfleck properties related to canopy depth and species, including distinct spectral composition under shade and sunflecks, suggest that mapping canopy structural traits may help us model photosynthesis dynamically.
  • Park, Sung-Bin; Knohl, Alexander; Migliavacca, Mirco; Thum, Tea; Vesala, Timo; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kolle, Olaf; Lavric, Jost; Park, Sang Seo; Heimann, Martin (2021)
    Climate change impacts the characteristics of the vegetation carbon-uptake process in the northern Eurasian terrestrial ecosystem. However, the currently available direct CO2 flux measurement datasets, particularly for central Siberia, are insufficient for understanding the current condition in the northern Eurasian carbon cycle. Here, we report daily and seasonal interannual variations in CO2 fluxes and associated abiotic factors measured using eddy covariance in a coniferous forest and a bog near Zotino, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, for April to early June, 2013-2017. Despite the snow not being completely melted, both ecosystems became weak net CO2 sinks if the air temperature was warm enough for photosynthesis. The forest became a net CO2 sink 7-16 days earlier than the bog. After the surface soil temperature exceeded similar to 1 degrees C, the ecosystems became persistent net CO2 sinks. Net ecosystem productivity was highest in 2015 for both ecosystems because of the anomalously high air temperature in May compared with other years. Our findings demonstrate that long-term monitoring of flux measurements at the site level, particularly during winter and its transition to spring, is essential for understanding the responses of the northern Eurasian ecosystem to spring warming.
  • Wang, Qing-Wei; Robson, Thomas Matthew; Pieristè, Marta; Oguro, Michi; Oguchi, Riichi; Murai, Yoshinori; Kurokawa, Hiroko (2020)
    Although sunlight is essential for plant growth and development, the relative importance of each spectral region in shaping functional traits is poorly understood, particularly in dynamic light environments such as forest ecosystems. We examined responses of 25 functional traits from groups of 11 shade-intolerant and 12 understorey shade-tolerant forb species grown outdoors under five filter treatments differing in spectral transmittance: (a) transmitting c. 95% of solar radiation (280-800 nm); (b) attenuating ultraviolet-B (UV-B); (c) attenuating all UV; (d) attenuating all UV and blue light; (e) attenuating all UV, blue and green light. Our results show that UV-B radiation mainly affected the biochemical traits but blue light mainly affected the physiological traits irrespective of functional strategy, whereas green light affected both sets of traits. This would suggest that differentiation among suites of functional trait responses proceeds according to light quality. Biomass accumulation was significantly increased by UV-A radiation (contrasting treatment [b] vs. [c]) among shade-intolerant but decreased by blue light among shade-tolerant species; green and red light affected whole-plant morphological development differently according to functional groups. Shade-tolerant species were more plastic than shade-intolerant species in response to each spectral region that we examined except for UV-B radiation. Synthesis. Our results show that differences in the spectral composition of sunlight can drive functional trait expression irrespective of total irradiance received. The different responses of functional traits between functional groups imply that shade-tolerant and intolerant species have adapted to utilize spectral cues differently in their respective light environments.
  • Dengel, S.; Grace, J.; MacArthur, A. (2015)
    We tested the hypothesis that diffuse radiation from cloudy and overcast skies penetrates the canopy more effectively than direct radiation from clear skies. We compared the flux density and spectral properties of direct and diffuse radiation (around solar noon (+/-1 h)) above, within and below a forest stand under sunny, cloudy and overcast conditions in a thinned Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) forest (28 years old, with a leaf area index of approximately 5.2m(2) m(-2)). We recorded vertical profiles of radiation penetration (from 350 to 1050 nm), and we also explored the horizontal pattern of radiation along a 115m transect. We showed that in "clear sky" conditions, the photosynthetically active radiation in the lower parts of the canopy was substantially attenuated, more so than under cloudy and overcast skies. It was particularly depleted in the blue part of the spectrum, but only slightly blue-depleted when the sky was overcast or cloudy. Moreover, the red : far-red ratio under clear skies fell to values less than 0.3 but only to 0.6 under cloudy or overcast skies. Near the ground, the light climate was strongly influenced by the thinning pattern (carried out in accordance with standard forestry management practice).
  • Majasalmi, Titta; Rautiainen, Miina; Stenberg, Pauline; Manninen, Terhikki (2015)
    Remote sensing of the fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (fPAR) has become a timely option to monitor forest productivity. However, only a few studies have had ground reference fPAR datasets containing both forest canopy and understory fPAR from boreal forests for the validation of satellite products. The aim of this paper was to assess the performance of two currently available satellite-based fPAR products: MODIS fPAR (MOD15A2, C5) and GEOV1 fPAR (g2_BIOPAR_FAPAR), as well as an NDVI-fPAR relationship applied to the MODIS surface reflectance product and a Landsat 8 image, in a boreal forest site in Finland. Our study area covered 16 km(2) and field data were collected from 307 forest plots. For all plots, we obtained both forest canopy fPAR and understory fPAR. The ground reference total fPAR agreed better with GEOV1 fPAR than with MODIS fPAR, which showed much more temporal variation during the peak-season than GEOV1 fPAR. At the chosen intercomparison date in peak growing season, MODIS NDVI based fPAR estimates were similar to GEOV1 fPAR, and produced on average 0.01 fPAR units smaller fPAR estimates than ground reference total fPAR. MODIS fPAR and Landsat 8 NDVI based fPAR estimates were similar to forest canopy fPAR.