Browsing by Subject "PLANT DEFENSE"

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  • Kaurilind, Eve; Xu, Enjun; Brosche, Mikael (2015)
    Background: To survive in a changing environment plants constantly monitor their surroundings. In response to several stresses and during photorespiration plants use reactive oxygen species as signaling molecules. The Arabidopsis thaliana catalase2 (cat2) mutant lacks a peroxisomal catalase and under photorespiratory conditions accumulates H2O2, which leads to activation of cell death. Methods: A cat2 double mutant collection was generated through crossing and scored for cell death in different assays. Selected double mutants were further analyzed for photosynthetic performance and H2O2 accumulation. Results: We used a targeted mutant analysis with more than 50 cat2 double mutants to investigate the role of stress hormones and other defense regulators in H2O2 -mediated cell death. Several transcription factors (AS1, MYB30, MYC2, WRKY70), cell death regulators (RCD1, DND1) and hormone regulators (AXR1, ERA1, SID2, EDS1, SGT1b) were essential for execution of cell death in cat2. Genetic loci required for cell death in cat2 was compared with regulators of cell death in spontaneous lesion mimic mutants and led to the identification of a core set of plant cell death regulators. Analysis of gene expression data from cat2 and plants undergoing cell death revealed similar gene expression profiles, further supporting the existence of a common program for regulation of plant cell death. Conclusions: Our results provide a genetic framework for further study on the role of H2O2 in regulation of cell death. The hormones salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and auxin, as well as their interaction, are crucial determinants of cell death regulation.
  • Trouvelot, Sophie; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Poinssot, Benoît; Gauthier, Adrien; Paris, Franck; Guillier, Christelle; Combier, Maud; Tdra, Lucie; Daire, Xavier; Adrian, Marielle (2014)
    Increasing interest is devoted to carbohydrates for their roles in plant immunity. Some of them are elicitors of plant defenses whereas other ones act as signaling molecules in a manner similar to phytohormones. This review first describes the main classes of carbohydrates associated to plant immunity, their role and mode of action. More precisely, the state of the art about perception of “PAMP, MAMP and DAMP type” oligosaccharides is presented and examples of induced defense events are provided. A particular attention is paid to the structure / activity relationships of these compounds. The role of sugars as signaling molecules, especially in plant microbe interactions, is also presented. Secondly, the potentialities and limits of foliar sprays of carbohydrates to stimulate plant immunity for crop protection against diseases are discussed, with focus on the roles of the leaf cuticle and phyllosphere microflora.
  • Vuorinen, Katariina; Zamora, Olena; Vaahtera, Lauri; Overmyer, Kirk; Brosché, Mikael (2021)
    Plants require interaction between signaling pathways to differentiate and integrate stress responses and deploy appropriate defenses. The hormones ethylene, salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acid (JA) are important regulators of plant defenses. Numerous interactions between these signaling pathways are the cornerstone of robust plant immunity. Additionally, during the early response to pathogens, reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling molecules. Here, we examined the extent of signal interaction in the early stages of Botrytis cinerea infection. To enable a comparison between B. cinerea infection with ROS signaling, we subjected plants to ozone treatment, which stimulates an apoplastic ROS burst. We used a collection of single, double, and triple signaling mutants defective in hormone signaling and biosynthesis and subjected them to B. cinerea infection and ozone treatment at different timepoints. We examined lesion size, cell death, and gene expression (both quantitatively and spatially). The two treatments shared many similarities, especially in JA-insensitive mutants, which were sensitive to both treatments. Unexpectedly, a B. cinerea- susceptible JA-insensitive mutant (coil), became tolerant when both SA biosynthesis and signaling was impaired (coil npr1 sid2), demonstrating that JA responses may be under the control of SA. Extensive marker gene analysis indicated JA as the main regulator of both B. cinerea and ozone defenses. In addition, we identified the transcription factor SRI_ as a crucial regulator of PLANT DEFENSIN expression and cell-death regulation, which contributes to resistance to B. cinerea. Overall, our work further defines the context of ROS in plant defense signaling.
  • Brosche, Mikael; Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Cui, Fuqiang; Sipari, Nina; Leppälä, Johanna; Lamminmäki, Airi; Tomai, Gloria; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Reddy, Ramesha A.; Keinänen, Markku Juhani; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko (2014)
  • van Dijk, Laura J. A.; Moreira, Xoaquin; Barr, Anna E.; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Faticov, Maria; Hardwick, Bess; ten Hoopen, Jan P. J. G.; de la Mata, Raul; Pires, Ricardo Matheus; Roslin, Tomas; Schigel, Dmitry S.; Timmermans, Bart G. H.; Tack, Ayco J. M. (2022)
    The world is rapidly urbanizing, thereby transforming natural landscapes and changing the abundance and distribution of organisms. However, insights into the effects of urbanization on species interactions, and plant-pathogen interactions in particular, are lacking. We investigated the effects of urbanization on powdery mildew infection on Quercus robur at continental and within-city scales. At the continental scale, we compared infection levels between urban and rural areas of different-sized cities in Europe, and investigated whether plant traits, climatic variables and CO2 emissions mediated the effect of urbanization on infection levels. Within one large city (Stockholm, Sweden), we further explored whether local habitat features and spatial connectivity influenced infection levels during multiple years. At the continental scale, infection severity was consistently higher on trees in urban than rural areas, with some indication that temperature mediated this effect. Within Stockholm city, temperature had no effect, while local accumulation of leaf litter negatively affected powdery mildew incidence in one out of three years, and more connected trees had lower infection levels. This study is the first to describe the effects of urbanization on plant-pathogen interactions both within and among cities, and to uncover the potential mechanisms behind the observed patterns at each scale.