Browsing by Subject "PLATELET ACTIVATION"

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  • Forsblom, Erik; Lepäntalo, Aino; Wartiovaara-Kautto, Ulla; Ruotsalainen, Eeva; Järvinen, Asko (2019)
    The aim of this study was to examine the changes in hemostasis parameters in endocarditis and thromboembolic events in nonfatal methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (MS-SAB) - a topic not evaluated previously. In total, 155 patients were recruited and were categorized according to the presence of endocarditis or thromboembolic events with gender-age adjusted controls. Patients who deceased within 90 days or patients not chosen as controls were excluded. SAB management was supervised by an infectious disease specialist. Patients with endocarditis (N = 21), compared to controls (N = 21), presented lower antithrombin III at day 4 (p <0.05), elevated antithrombin III at day 90 (p <0.01), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time at days 4 and 10 (p <0.05), and enhanced thrombin-antithrombin complex at day 4 (p <0.01). Thromboembolic events (N = 8), compared to controls (N = 34), significantly increased thrombin-antithrombin complex at day 4 (p <0.05). In receiver operating characteristic analysis, the changes in these hemostasis parameters at day 4 predicted endocarditis and thromboembolic events (p <0.05). No differences in hemoglobin, thrombocyte, prothrombin fragment, thrombin time, factor VIII, D-dimer or fibrinogen levels were observed between cases and controls. The results suggest that nonfatal MS-SAB patients present marginal hemostasis parameter changes that, however, may have predictability for endocarditis or thromboembolic events. Larger studies are needed to further assess the connection of hemostasis to complications in SAB.
  • Nissila, Eija; Douillard, Francois P.; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Jarvinen, Hanna M.; Rasinkangas, Pia; Haapasalo, Karita; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna; de Vos, Willem M. (2017)
    Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are ubiquitous in fermented foods, and in the human body where they are commensals naturally present in the normal microbiota composition of gut, vagina and skin. However, in some cases, Lactobacillus spp. have been implicated in bacteremia. The aim of the study was to examine the genomic and immunological properties of 16 clinical blood isolates of L. rhamnosus and to compare them to the well- studied L. rhamnosus probiotic strain GG. Blood cultures from bacteremic patients were collected at the Helsinki University Hospital laboratory in 2005-2011 and L. rhamnosus strains were isolated and characterized by genomic sequencing. The capacity of the L. rhamnosus strains to activate serum complement was studied using immunological assays for complement factor C3a and the terminal pathway complement complex (TCC). Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4bp was also determined using radioligand assays. Furthermore, the isolated strains were evaluated for their ability to aggregate platelets and to form biofilms in vitro. Genomic comparison between the clinical L. rhamnosus strains showed them to be clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG and to cluster in two distinct lineages. All L. rhamnosus strains activated complement in serum and none of them bound complement regulators. Four out of 16 clinical blood isolates induced platelet aggregation and/or formed more biofilms than L. rhamnosus GG, which did not display platelet aggregation activity nor showed strong biofilm formation. These findings suggest that clinical L. rhamnosus isolates show considerable heterogeneity but are clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG at the genomic level. All L. rhamnosus strains are still normally recognized by the human complement system.
  • Hyvarinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari (2015)
    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation.