Browsing by Subject "PNPLA3"

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  • Emdin, Connor A.; Haas, Mary E.; Khera, Amit V.; Aragam, Krishna; Chaffin, Mark; Klarin, Derek; Hindy, George; Jiang, Lan; Wei, Wei-Qi; Feng, Qiping; Karjalainen, Juha; Havulinna, Aki; Kiiskinen, Tuomo; Bick, Alexander; Ardissino, Diego; Wilson, James G.; Schunkert, Heribert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Elosua, Roberto; Bown, Matthew J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Baber, Usman; Erdmann, Jeanette; Gupta, Namrata; Danesh, John; Saleheen, Danish; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Vujkovic, Marijana; Voight, Ben; Damrauer, Scott; Lynch, Julie; Kaplan, David; Serper, Marina; Tsao, Philip; Program, Million Veteran; Mercader, Josep; Hanis, Craig; Daly, Mark; Denny, Joshua; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar (2020)
    Author summary Cirrhosis is a leading cause of death worldwide. However, the genetic underpinnings of cirrhosis remain poorly understood. In this study, we analyze twelve thousand individuals with cirrhosis and identify a common missense variant in a gene called MARC1 that protects against cirrhosis. Carriers of this missense variant also have lower blood cholesterol levels, lower liver enzyme levels and reduced liver fat. We identify an additional two low-frequency coding variants in MARC1 that are also associated with lower cholesterol levels, lower liver enzyme levels and protection from cirrhosis. Finally, we identify an individual homozygous for a predicted loss-of-function variant in MARC1 who exhibits very low blood LDL cholesterol levels. These genetic findings suggest that MARC1 deficiency may lower blood cholesterol levels and protect against cirrhosis, pointing to MARC1 as a potential therapeutic target for liver disease. Analyzing 12,361 all-cause cirrhosis cases and 790,095 controls from eight cohorts, we identify a common missense variant in the Mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component 1 gene (MARC1 p.A165T) that associates with protection from all-cause cirrhosis (OR 0.91, p = 2.3*10(-11)). This same variant also associates with lower levels of hepatic fat on computed tomographic imaging and lower odds of physician-diagnosed fatty liver as well as lower blood levels of alanine transaminase (-0.025 SD, 3.7*10(-43)), alkaline phosphatase (-0.025 SD, 1.2*10(-37)), total cholesterol (-0.030 SD, p = 1.9*10(-36)) and LDL cholesterol (-0.027 SD, p = 5.1*10(-30)) levels. We identified a series of additional MARC1 alleles (low-frequency missense p.M187K and rare protein-truncating p.R200Ter) that also associated with lower cholesterol levels, liver enzyme levels and reduced risk of cirrhosis (0 cirrhosis cases for 238 R200Ter carriers versus 17,046 cases of cirrhosis among 759,027 non-carriers, p = 0.04) suggesting that deficiency of the MARC1 enzyme may lower blood cholesterol levels and protect against cirrhosis.
  • Zhang, Kaiyi; Tao, Cong; Xu, Jianping; Ruan, Jinxue; Xia, Jihan; Zhu, Wenjuan; Xin, Leilei; Ye, Huaqiong; Xie, Ning; Xia, Boce; Li, Chenxiao; Wu, Tianwen; Wang, Yanfang; Schroyen, Martine; Xiao, Xinhua; Fan, Jiangao; Yang, Shulin (2021)
    Anti-inflammatory therapies have the potential to become an effective treatment for obesity-related diseases. However, the huge gap of immune system between human and rodent leads to limitations of drug discovery. This work aims at constructing a transgenic pig model with higher risk of metabolic diseases and outlining the immune responses at the early stage of metaflammation by transcriptomic strategy. We used CRISPR/Cas9 techniques to targeted knock-in three humanized disease risk genes, GIPR(dn) , hIAPP and PNPLA3(I148M) . Transgenic effect increased the risk of metabolic disorders. Triple-transgenic pigs with short-term diet intervention showed early symptoms of type 2 diabetes, including glucose intolerance, pancreatic lipid infiltration, islet hypertrophy, hepatic lobular inflammation and adipose tissue inflammation. Molecular pathways related to CD8(+) T cell function were significantly activated in the liver and visceral adipose samples from triple-transgenic pigs, including antigen processing and presentation, T-cell receptor signaling, co-stimulation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine and chemokine secretion. The similar pro-inflammatory signaling in liver and visceral adipose tissue indicated that there might be a potential immune crosstalk between the two tissues. Moreover, genes that functionally related to liver antioxidant activity, mitochondrial function and extracellular matrix showed distinct expression between the two groups, indicating metabolic stress in transgenic pigs' liver samples. We confirmed that triple-transgenic pigs had high coincidence with human metabolic diseases, especially in the scope of inflammatory signaling at early stage metaflammation. Taken together, this study provides a valuable large animal model for the clinical study of metaflammation and metabolic diseases.
  • Petäjä, Elina M.; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele (2016)
    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis (NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. "Obese/Metabolic NAFLD" is closely associated with obesity and insulin resistance and therefore predisposes to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. NAFLD can also be caused by common genetic variants, the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) or the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2). Since NAFL, irrespective of its cause, can progress to NASH and liver fibrosis, its definition is of interest. We reviewed the literature to identify data on definition of normal liver fat using liver histology and different imaging tools, and analyzed whether NAFLD caused by the gene variants is associated with insulin resistance. Histologically, normal liver fat content in liver biopsies is most commonly defined as macroscopic steatosis in less than 5% of hepatocytes. In the population-based Dallas Heart Study, the upper 95th percentile of liver fat measured by proton magnetic spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in healthy subjects was 5.6%, which corresponds to approximately 15% histological liver fat. When measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based techniques such as the proton density fat fraction (PDFF), 5% macroscopic steatosis corresponds to a PDFF of 6% to 6.4%. In contrast to "Obese/metabolic NAFLD", NAFLD caused by genetic variants is not associated with insulin resistance. This implies that NAFLD is heterogeneous and that "Obese/Metabolic NAFLD" but not NAFLD due to the PNPLA3 or TM6SF2 genetic variants predisposes to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
  • Luukkonen, Panu K.; Qadri, Sami; Ahlholm, Noora; Porthan, Kimmo; Mannisto, Ville; Sammalkorpi, Henna; Penttilä, Anne K.; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lehtimäki, Tiina E.; Gaggini, Melania; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Orho-Melander, Marju; Arola, Johanna; Juuti, Anne; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Hodson, Leanne; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele (2022)
    Background & Aims: There is substantial inter-individual variability in the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Part of which is explained by insulin resistance (IR) ('MetComp') and part by common modifiers of genetic risk ('GenComp'). We examined how IR on the one hand and genetic risk on the other contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Methods: We studied 846 individuals: 492 were obese patients with liver histology and 354 were individuals who underwent intrahepatic triglyceride measurement by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A genetic risk score was calculated using the number of risk alleles in PNPLA3, TM6SF2, MBOAT7, HSD17B13 and MARC1. Substrate concentrations were assessed by serum NMR metabolomics. In subsets of participants, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and their flux were assessed by D-5-glycerol and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (n = 41), and hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) was measured by D2O (n = 61). Results: We found that substrate surplus (increased concentrations of 28 serum metabolites including glucose, glycolytic intermediates, and amino acids; increased NEFAs and their flux; increased DNL) characterized the 'MetComp'. In contrast, the 'GenComp' was not accompanied by any substrate excess but was characterized by an increased hepaticmitochondrial redox state, as determined by serum beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratio, and inhibition of hepatic pathways dependent on tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, such as DNL. Serum beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratio correlated strongly with all histological features of NAFLD. IR and hepatic mitochondrial redox state conferred additive increases in histological features of NAFLD. Conclusions: These data show that the mechanisms underlying 'Metabolic' and 'Genetic' components of NAFLD are fundamentally different. These findings may have implications with respect to the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD. Lay summary: The pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can be explained in part by a metabolic component, including obesity, and in part by a genetic component. Herein, we demonstrate that the mechanisms underlying these components are fundamentally different: the metabolic component is characterized by hepatic oversupply of substrates, such as sugars, lipids and amino acids. In contrast, the genetic component is characterized by impaired hepatic mitochondrial function, making the liver less able to metabolize these substrates. (C) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Association for the Study of the Liver.
  • Anstee, Quentin M.; Darlay, Rebecca; Cockell, Simon; Meroni, Marica; Govaere, Olivier; Tiniakos, Dina; Burt, Alastair D.; Bedossa, Pierre; Palmer, Jeremy; Liu, Yang-Lin; Aithal, Guruprasad P.; Allison, Michael; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Vacca, Michele; Dufour, Jean-Francois; Invernizzi, Pietro; Prati, Daniele; Ekstedt, Mattias; Kechagias, Stergios; Francque, Sven; Petta, Salvatore; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Clement, Karine; Ratziu, Vlad; Schattenberg, Jörn M.; Valenti, Luca; Day, Christopher P.; Cordell, Heather J.; Daly, Ann K. (2020)
    Background and Aims Genetic factors associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain incompletely understood. To date, most GWAS studies have adopted radiologically assessed hepatic triglyceride content as reference phenotype and so cannot address steatohepatitis or fibrosis. We describe a genome-wide association study (GWAS) encompassing the full spectrum of histologically characterized NAFLD. Methods The GWAS involved 1483 European NAFLD cases and 17781 genetically-matched population controls. A replication cohort of 559 NAFLD cases and 945 controls was genotyped to confirm signals showing genome-wide or close to genome-wide significance. Results Case-control analysis identified signals showing p-values ≤ 5 x 10-8 at four locations (chromosome (chr) 2 GCKR/C2ORF16; chr4 HSD17B13; chr19 TM6SF2; chr22 PNPLA3) together with two other signals with p
  • Luukkonen, Panu K.; Zhou, You; Sädevirta, Sanja; Leivonen , Marja; Arola, Johanna; Oresic, Matej; Hyotylainen, Tuulia; Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele (2016)
    Background & Aims: Recent data in mice have identified de novo ceramide synthesis as the key mediator of hepatic insulin resistance (IR) that in humans characterizes increases in liver fat due to IR ('Metabolic NAFLD' but not that due to the I148M gene variant in PNPLA3 ('PNPLA3 NAFLD'). We determined which bioactive lipids co-segregate with IR in the human liver. Methods: Liver lipidome was profiled in liver biopsies from 125 subjects that were divided into equally sized groups based on median HOMA-IR ('High and Low HOMA-IR', n = 62 and n = 63) or PNPLA3 genotype (PNPIA3(148MM/MI), n = 61 vs. PNPLA3(148II), n = 64). The subjects were also divided into 4 groups who had either IR, the I148M gene variant, both of the risk factors or neither. Results: Steatosis and NASH prevalence were similarly increased in 'High HOMA-IR' and PNPLA3(148MM/MI) groups compared to their respective control groups. The 'High HOMA-IR' but not the PNPLA3(148MM/MI) group had features of IR. The liver in 'High HOMA-IR' vs. low HOMA-IR' was markedly enriched in saturated and monounsaturated triacylglycerols and free fatty acids, dihydroceramides (markers of de novo ceramide synthesis) and ceramides. Markers of other ceramide synthetic pathways were unchanged. In PNPLA3(148MM/MI) vs. PNPLA3(148II), the increase in liver fat was due to polyunsaturated triacylglycerols while other lipids were unchanged. Similar changes were observed when data were analyzed using the 4 subgroups. Conclusions: Similar increases in liver fat and NASH are associated with a metabolically harmful saturated, ceramide-enriched liver lipidome in 'Metabolic NAFLD' but not in 'PNPLA3 NAFLD'. This difference may explain why metabolic but not PNPLA3 NAFLD increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. (C) 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Xia, Ming-Feng; Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele; Bian, Hua; Lin, Huan-Dong; Yan, Hong-Mei; Chang, Xin-Xia; Zhou, You; Gao, Xin (2016)
    Objectives Presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can predict risks for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and advanced liver disease in the general population. We aimed to establish a non-invasive score for prediction of NAFLD in Han Chinese, the largest ethnic group in the world, and detect whether ethnicity influences the accuracy of such a score. Methods Liver fat content (LFAT) was measured by quantitative ultrasound in 3548 subjects in the Shanghai Changfeng Community and a Chinese score was created using multivariate logistic regression analyses. This new score was internally validated in Chinese and externally in Finns. Its diagnostic performance was compared to the NAFLD liver fat score, fatty liver index (FLI) and hepatic steatosis index (HSI) developed in Finns, Italians and Koreans. We also analyzed how obesity related to LFAT measured by H-1-MRS in 79 Finns and 118 Chinese with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Results The metabolic syndrome and T2D, fasting serum insulin, body mass index (BMI) and AST/ALT ratio were independent predictors of NAFLD in Chinese. The AUROC in the Chinese validation cohort was 0.76 (0.73-0.78) and in Finns 0.73 (0.68-0.78) (p Conclusion The predictors of NAFLD in Han Chinese are as in Europids but the Chinese have more LFAT for any given degree of obesity than Europids. Ethnicity needs to be considered when NAFLD is predicted using risk scores.
  • Lallukka, S.; Yki-Jarvinen, H. (2016)
    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a spectrum of liver disease from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is commonly associated with features of the metabolic/insulin resistance syndrome ('Metabolic/Obese NAFLD') and may therefore predict type 2 diabetes (T2DM). For this review, we searched for prospective studies examining whether NAFLD predicts T2DM, and if so, whether this occurs independently of factors such as age and obesity. These studies included NAFLD diagnosed by ultrasonography (n = 6) or liver enzymes (n = 14). All ultrasonography studies found NAFLD to predict the risk of T2DM independently of age, and in 4 out of 6 studies NAFLD was also a predictor independently of BMI. NAFLD was a predictor of T2DM in all 14 studies where NAFLD was diagnosed by liver enzymes. In 12 of these studies, ALT or AST or GGT were significant predictors of T2DM risk, independently of age and BMI. NAFLD, however, is heterogeneous and may also be caused by common genetic variants. The I148M variant in PNPLA3 and the E167K variant in TM6SF2 are both associated with increased liver fat content, but not features of the metabolic/insulin resistance syndrome. These genetic forms of NAFLD predict NASH and cirrhosis but not T2DM. Taken together these data imply that 'Metabolic/Obese NAFLD' predicts T2DM independently of age and obesity and support the role of hepatic insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of this disease. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • EU-PNAFLD Investigators; GOLD Consortium; Teo, Kevin; Abeysekera, Kushala W. M.; Luukkonen, Panu K.; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele (2021)
    Background & Aims: A common genetic variant near MBOAT7 (rs641738C>T) has been previously associated with hepatic fat and advanced histology in NAFLD; however, these findings have not been consistently replicated in the literature. We aimed to establish whether rs641738C>T is a risk factor across the spectrum of NAFLD and to characterise its role in the regulation of related metabolic phenotypes through a meta-analysis. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of studies with data on the association between rs641738C>T genotype and liver fat, NAFLD histology, and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lipids or insulin. These included directly genotyped studies and population-level data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We performed a random effects meta-analysis using recessive, additive and dominant genetic models. Results: Data from 1,066,175 participants (9,688 with liver biopsies) across 42 studies were included in the meta-analysis. rs641738C>T was associated with higher liver fat on CT/MRI (+0.03 standard deviations [95% CI 0.02-0.05], p(z) = 4.8x10(-5)) and diagnosis of NAFLD (odds ratio [OR] 1.17 [95% CI 1.05-1.3], p(z) = 0.003) in Caucasian adults. The variant was also positively associated with presence of advanced fibrosis (OR 1.22 [95% CI 1.03-1.45], p(z) = 0.021) in Caucasian adults using a recessive model of inheritance (CC + CT vs. TT). Meta-analysis of data from previous GWAS found the variant to be associated with higher ALT (p(z) = 0.002) and lower serum triglycerides (p(z) = 1.5x10(-4)). rs641738C>T was not associated with fasting insulin and no effect was observed in children with NAFLD. Conclusions: Our study validates rs641738C>T near MBOAT7 as a risk factor for the presence and severity of NAFLD in individuals of European descent. Lay summary: Fatty liver disease is a common condition where fat builds up in the liver, which can cause liver inflammation and scarring (including 'cirrhosis'). It is closely linked to obesity and diabetes, but some genes are also thought to be important. We did this study to see whether one specific change ('variant') in one gene ('MBOAT7') was linked to fatty liver disease. We took data from over 40 published studies and found that this variant near MBOAT7 is linked to more severe fatty liver disease. This means that drugs designed to work on MBOAT7 could be useful for treating fatty liver disease. (C) 2020 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Isokuortti, Elina; Zhou, You; Peltonen, Markku; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Clement, Karine; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Schuppan, Detlef; Schattenberg, Joern M.; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Jousilahti, Pekka; Mannisto, Satu; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Saltevo, Juha; Anstee, Quentin M.; Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele (2017)
    Aims/hypothesis Recent European guidelines for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) call for reference values for HOMA-IR. In this study, we aimed to determine: (1) the upper limit of normal HOMA-IR in two population-based cohorts; (2) the HOMA-IR corresponding to NAFLD; (3) the effect of sex and PNPLA3 genotype at rs738409 on HOMA-IR; and (4) inter-laboratory variations in HOMA-IR. Methods We identified healthy individuals in two population-based cohorts (FINRISK 2007 [n = 5024] and the Programme for Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Finland [FIN-D2D; n = 2849]) to define the upper 95th percentile of HOMA-IR. Non-obese individuals with normal fasting glucose levels, no excessive alcohol use, no known diseases and no use of any drugs were considered healthy. The optimal HOMA-IR cut-off for NAFLD (liver fat >= 5.56%, based on the Dallas Heart Study) was determined in 368 non-diabetic individuals (35% with NAFLD), whose liver fat was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Samples from ten individuals were simultaneously analysed for HOMA-IR in seven European laboratories. Results The upper 95th percentiles of HOMA-IR were 1.9 and 2.0 in healthy individuals in the FINRISK (n = 1167) and FIN-D2D (n = 459) cohorts. Sex or PNPLA3 genotype did not influence these values. The optimal HOMA-IR cutoff for NAFLD was 1.9 (sensitivity 87%, specificity 79%). A HOMA-IR of 2.0 corresponded to normal liver fat ( Conclusions/interpretation The upper limit of HOMA-IR in population-based cohorts closely corresponds to that of normal liver fat. Standardisation of insulin assays would be the first step towards definition of normal values for HOMA-IR.