Browsing by Subject "POPULATION-BASED TWIN"

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  • Rosenstrom, Tom; Fawcett, Tim W.; Higginson, Andrew D.; Metsa-Simola, Niina; Hagen, Edward H.; Houston, Alasdair I.; Martikainen, Pekka (2017)
    Divorce is associated with an increased probability of a depressive episode, but the causation of events remains unclear. Adaptive models of depression propose that depression is a social strategy in part, whereas non-adaptive models tend to propose a diathesis-stress mechanism. We compare an adaptive evolutionary model of depression to three alternative non-adaptive models with respect to their ability to explain the temporal pattern of depression around the time of divorce. Register-based data (304,112 individuals drawn from a random sample of 11% of Finnish people) on antidepressant purchases is used as a proxy for depression. This proxy affords an unprecedented temporal resolution (a 3-monthly prevalence estimates over 10 years) without any bias from non-compliance, and it can be linked with underlying episodes via a statistical model. The evolutionary-adaptation model (all time periods with risk of divorce are depressogenic) was the best quantitative description of the data. The non-adaptive stress-relief model (period before divorce is depressogenic and period afterwards is not) provided the second best quantitative description of the data. The peak-stress model (periods before and after divorce can be depressogenic) fit the data less well, and the stress-induction model (period following divorce is depressogenic and the preceding period is not) did not fit the data at all. The evolutionary model was the most detailed mechanistic description of the divorce-depression link among the models, and the best fit in terms of predicted curvature; thus, it offers most rigorous hypotheses for further study. The stress-relief model also fit very well and was the best model in a sensitivity analysis, encouraging development of more mechanistic models for that hypothesis.
  • Brainstorm Consortium; Anttila, Verneri; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Finucane, Hilary K.; Walters, Raymond K.; Bras, Jose; Duncan, Laramie; Escott-Price, Valentina; Falcone, Guido J.; Gormley, Padhraig; Malik, Rainer; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Ripke, Stephan; Wei, Zhi; Yu, Dongmei; Lee, Phil H.; Turley, Patrick; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Chouraki, Vincent; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Berr, Claudine; Letenneur, Luc; Hannequin, Didier; Amouyel, Philippe; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Duron, Emmanuelle; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Reitz, Christiane; Goate, Alison M.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Larson, Eric B.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A.; Palta, Priit; Wedenoja, Juho; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Kurki, Mitja I.; Hämäläinen, Eija; Kaprio, Jaakko; Metspalu, Andres; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Ripatti, Samuli; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Daly, Mark; Palotie, Aarno; Neale, Benjamin M. (2018)
    Disorders of the brain can exhibit considerable epidemiological comorbidity and often share symptoms, provoking debate about their etiologic overlap. We quantified the genetic sharing of 25 brain disorders from genome-wide association studies of 265,218 patients and 784,643 control participants and assessed their relationship to 17 phenotypes from 1,191,588 individuals. Psychiatric disorders share common variant risk, whereas neurological disorders appear more distinct from one another and from the psychiatric disorders. We also identified significant sharing between disorders and a number of brain phenotypes, including cognitive measures. Further, we conducted simulations to explore how statistical power, diagnostic misclassification, and phenotypic heterogeneity affect genetic correlations. These results highlight the importance of common genetic variation as a risk factor for brain disorders and the value of heritability-based methods in understanding their etiology.
  • Tuominen, Lauri; Miettunen, Jouko; Cannon, Dara M.; Drevets, Wayne C.; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Hirvonen, Jussi; Ichise, Masanori; Jensen, Peter S.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Klaver, Jacqueline M.; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya; Hietala, Jarmo (2017)
    Background: Neuroticism is a major risk factor for affective disorders. This personality trait has been hypothesized to associate with synaptic availability of the serotonin transporter, which critically controls serotonergic tone in the brain. However, earlier studies linking neuroticism and serotonin transporter have failed to produce converging findings. Because sex affects both the serotonergic system and the risk that neuroticism poses to the individual, sex may modify the association between neuroticism and serotonin transporter, but this question has not been investigated by previous studies. Methods: Here, we combined data from 4 different positron emission tomography imaging centers to address whether neuroticism is related to serotonin transporter binding in vivo. The data set included serotonin transporter binding potential values from the thalamus and striatum and personality scores from 91 healthy males and 56 healthy females. We specifically tested if the association between neuroticism and serotonin transporter is different in females and males. Results: We found that neuroticism and thalamic serotonin transporter binding potentials were associated in both males and females, but with opposite directionality. Higher neuroticism associated with higher serotonin transporter binding potential in males (standardized beta 0.292, P = .008), whereas in females, higher neuroticism associated with lower serotonin transporter binding potential (standardized beta -0.288, P = .014). Conclusions: The finding is in agreement with recent studies showing that the serotonergic system is involved in affective disorders differently in males and females and suggests that contribution of thalamic serotonin transporter to the risk of affective disorders depends on sex.
  • Komulainen, Emma; Meskanen, Katarina; Lipsanen, Jari; Lahti, Jari Marko; Jylha, Pekka; Melartin, Tarja; Wichers, Marieke; Isometsa, Erkki; Ekelund, Jesper (2014)
  • Kaprio, Jaakko; Bollepalli, Sailalitha; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Iso-Markku, Paula; Korhonen, Tellervo; Kovanen, Vuokko; Kujala, Urho; Laakkonen, Eija K.; Latvala, Antti; Leskinen, Tuija; Lindgren, Noora; Ollikainen, Miina; Piirtola, Maarit; Rantanen, Taina; Rinne, Juha; Rose, Richard J.; Sillanpää, Elina; Silventoinen, Karri; Sipilä, Sarianna; Viljanen, Anne; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Waller, Katja (2019)
    The older Finnish Twin Cohort (FTC) was established in 1974. The baseline survey was in 1975, with two follow-up health surveys in 1981 and 1990. The fourth wave of assessments was done in three parts, with a questionnaire study of twins born during 1945-1957 in 2011-2012, while older twins were interviewed and screened for dementia in two time periods, between 1999 and 2007 for twins born before 1938 and between 2013 and 2017 for twins born in 1938-1944. The content of these wave 4 assessments is described and some initial results are described. In addition, we have invited twin-pairs, based on response to the cohortwide surveys, to participate in detailed in-person studies; these are described briefly together with key results. We also review other projects based on the older FTC and provide information on the biobanking of biosamples and related phenotypes.