Browsing by Subject "POSTERIOR SAGITTAL ANORECTOPLASTY"

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  • Rintala, Risto J. (2016)
    Persistent cloaca remains a challenge for pediatric surgeons and urologists. Reconstructive surgery of cloacal malformations aims to repair the anorectum, urinary tract, and genital organs, and achieve fecal and urinary continence as well as functional genital tract capable for sexual activity and pregnancy. Unfortunately, even in most experienced hands these goals are not always accomplished. The endpoint of the functional development of bowel, urinary, and genital functions is the completion of patient's growth and sexual maturity. It is unlikely that there will be any significant functional improvement beyond these time points. About half of the patients with cloaca attain fecal and urinary continence after their growth period. The remaining half stay clean or dry by adjunctive measures such as bowel management by enemas or ACE channel, and continent urinary diversion or intermittent catheterization. Problems related to genital organs such as obstructed menstruations, amenorrhea, and introitus stenosis are common and often require secondary surgery. Encouragingly, most adolescent and adult patients are capable of sexual life despite often complex vaginal primary and secondary reconstructions. Also, cloacal malformation does not preclude pregnancies, although they still are quite rare. Pregnant patients with cloaca require special care and follow-up to guarantee uncomplicated pregnancy and preservation of anorectal and urinary functions. Cesarean section is recommended for cloaca patients. The self-reported quality of life of cloaca patients appears to be comparable to that of female patients with less complex anorectal malformations. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Kyrklund, Kristiina; Pakarinen, Mikko P.; Rintala, Risto J. (2017)
    Anorectal malformations are an important group of congenital anomalies that vary widely in their anatomical characteristics and complexity. Understanding the long-term functional outcomes after modern treatments, and how these compare to the general population, are essential for ensuring that patients receive optimal, evidence-based care. With increasing appreciation of the wider impact of the illness on patients and their families, minimizing social disability from fecal incontinence and enabling normal social integration from the outset are key management concerns. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the functional outcomes by type of malformation, reflecting on the literature, and our institutional experience over a follow-up period of nearly 30 years. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Kyrklund, Kristiina; Pakarinen, Mikko P.; Rintala, Risto J. (2017)
    Aims: To compare anorectal manometry (AM) in patients with different types of anorectal malformations (ARMs) in relation to functional outcomes. Methods: A single-institution, cross-sectional study. After ethical approval, all patients >= 7 years old treated for anterior anus (AA), perineal fistula (PF), vestibular fistula (VF), or rectourethral fistula (RUF) from 1983 onwards were invited to answer the Rintala bowel function score (BFS) questionnaire and to attend anorectal manometry (AM). Patients with mild ARMs (AA females and PF males) had been treated with minimally invasive perineal procedures. Females with VF/PF and males with RUF had undergone internal-sphincter saving sagittal repairs. Results: 55 of 132 respondents (42%; median age 12 (7-29) years; 42% male) underwent AM. Patients with mild ARMs displayed good anorectal function after minimally invasive treatments. The median anal resting and squeeze pressures among patients with mild ARMs(60 cm H2O and 116 cm H2O respectively) were significantly higher than among patients with more severe ARMs (50 cm H2O, and 80 cm H2O respectively; p Conclusions: Our findings support the appropriateness of our minimally invasive approaches to the management of mild ARMs, and IAS-saving anatomical repairs for patients with more severe malformations. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.