Browsing by Subject "PREBIOTICS"

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  • Sloan, Tim J.; Jalanka, Jonna; Major, Giles A. D.; Krishnasamy, Shanthi; Pritchard, Sue; Abdelrazig, Salah; Korpela, Katri; Singh, Gulzar; Mulvenna, Claire; Hoad, Caroline L.; Marciani, Luca; Barrett, David A.; Lomer, Miranda C. E.; de Vos, Willem M.; Gowland, Penny A.; Spiller, Robin C. (2018)
    Background & aims Ingestion of poorly digested, fermentable carbohydrates (fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols; FODMAPs) have been implicated in exacerbating intestinal symptoms and the reduction of intake with symptom alleviation. Restricting FODMAP intake is believed to relieve colonic distension by reducing colonic fermentation but this has not been previously directly assessed. We performed a randomised controlled trial comparing the effect of a low FODMAP diet combined with either maltodextrin or oligofructose on colonic contents, metabolites and microbiota. Methods A parallel randomised controlled trial in healthy adults (n = 37). All subjects followed a low FODMAP diet for a week and supplemented their diet with either maltodextrin (MD) or oligofructose (OF) 7g twice daily. Fasted assessments performed pre- and post-diet included MRI to assess colonic volume, breath testing for hydrogen and methane, and stool collection for microbiota analysis. Results The low FODMAP diet was associated with a reduction in Bifidobacterium and breath hydrogen, which was reversed by oligofructose supplementation. The difference in breath hydrogen between groups post-intervention was 27ppm (95% CI 7 to 50, P Conclusion A low FODMAP diet reduces total bacterial count and gas production with little effect on colonic volume.
  • Lyra, Anna; Krogius-Kurikka, Lotta; Nikkila, Janne; Malinen, Erja; Kajander, Kajsa; Kurikka, Kyosti; Korpela, Riitta Anneli; Palva, Airi (2010)
  • Lyra, Anna; Hillilä, Markku; Huttunen, Teppo; Mannikko, Sofia; Taalikka, Mikko; Tennila, Julia; Tarpila, Anneli; Lahtinen, Sampo; Ouwehand, Arthur C.; Veijola, Lea (2016)
    AIM To determine the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and quality of life (QoL). METHODS In this randomized triple-blind trial, adult IBS volunteers who were recruited according to Rome. criteria received 109 or 1010 colony-forming units of NCFM or placebo daily for 12 wk. IBS Symptom Severity Score (IBS-SSS), which constituted the primary outcome, and secondary outcomes, including individual IBS symptoms, IBS-related QoL questionnaire, anxiety and depression, defecation frequency, and stool consistency, were assessed at baseline at the end of the 8-wk runin period, after 4 and 12 wk of intervention, and after a 4-wk washout. RESULTS A total of 340 of 391 randomized volunteers completed the trial. IBS-SSS improved over 12 wk of treatment in all treatment groups, decreasing by a mean +/- SD of 44.0 +/- 80.2, 50.8 +/- 82.4, and 48.3 +/- 72.2 in the placebo, active low-dose, and active high-dose groups, respectively. Similarly, secondary outcomes did not differ between treatment groups. However, in a post hoc analysis of volunteers with moderate to severe abdominal pain at baseline (VAS > 35/100), the treatment significantly reduced the sensation of abdominal pain. Pain scores fell by 20.8 +/- 22.8, 29.4 +/- 17.9, and 31.2 +/- 21.9 in the placebo, active low-dose, and active high-dose groups, respectively (P value for placebo vs combined active doses = 0.0460). CONCLUSION NCFM alleviates moderate to severe abdominal pain, consistent with earlier observations of this strain mitigating visceral pain through increased analgesic receptor expression.