Browsing by Subject "PREVENTION PROGRAM"

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  • Vornanen, Marleena; Konttinen, Hanna; Peltonen, Markku; Haukkala, Ari (2021)
    Background Perceived disease risk may reflect actual risk indicators and/or motivation to change lifestyle. Yet, few longitudinal studies have assessed how perceived risk relates to risk indicators among different disease risk groups. We examined in a 5-year follow-up, whether perceived risks of diabetes and cardiovascular disease predicted physical activity, body mass index (BMI kg/m(2)), and blood glucose level, or the reverse. We examined further whether perceived risk, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs together predicted changes in these risk indicators. Method Participants were high diabetes risk participants (N = 432) and low/moderate-risk participants (N = 477) from the national FINRISK 2002 study who were followed up in 2007. Both study phases included questionnaires and health examinations with individual feedback letters. Data were analyzed using gender- and age-adjusted structural equation models. Results In cross-lagged autoregressive models, perceived risks were not found to predict 5-year changes in physical activity, BMI, or 2-h glucose. In contrast, higher BMI and 2-h glucose predicted 5-year increases in perceived risks (beta-values 0.07-0.15,P-values <0.001-0.138). These associations were similar among high- and low/moderate-risk samples. In further structural equation models, higher self-efficacy predicted increased physical activity among both samples (beta-values 0.10-0.16,P-values 0.005-0.034). Higher outcome beliefs predicted lower BMI among the low/moderate-risk sample (beta-values - 0.04 to - 0.05,P-values 0.008-0.011). Conclusion Perceived risk of chronic disease rather follows risk indicators than predicts long-term lifestyle changes. To promote sustained lifestyle changes, future intervention studies need to examine the best ways to combine risk feedback with efficient behavior change techniques.
  • Bahijri, Suhad; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Jambi, Hanan; Al Ahmadi, Jawaher; Borai, Anwar; Barengo, Noël C; Tuomilehto, Jaakko (2020)
    Abstract Aims/Introduction To develop a non-invasive risk score to identify Saudis having prediabetes or undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods Adult Saudis without diabetes were recruited randomly using a stratified two-stage cluster sampling method. Demographic, dietary, lifestyle variables, personal and family medical history were collected using a questionnaire. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were taken. Body mass index was calculated. The 1-h oral glucose tolerance test was carried out. Glycated hemoglobin, fasting and 1-h plasma glucose were measured, and obtained values were used to define prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (dysglycemia). Logistic regression models were used for assessing the association between various factors and dysglycemia, and Hosmer?Lemeshow summary statistics were used to assess the goodness-of-fit. Results A total of 791 men and 612 women were included, of whom 69 were found to have diabetes, and 259 had prediabetes. The prevalence of dysglycemia was 23%, increasing with age, reaching 71% in adults aged ≥65 years. In univariate analysis age, body mass index, waist circumference, use of antihypertensive medication, history of hyperglycemia, low physical activity, short sleep and family history of diabetes were statistically significant. The final model for the Saudi Diabetes Risk Score constituted sex, age, waist circumference, history of hyperglycemia and family history of diabetes, with the score ranging from 0 to 15. Its fit based on assessment using the receiver operating characteristic curve was good, with an area under the curve of 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.73?0.79). The proposed cut-point for dysglycemia is 5 or 6, with sensitivity and specificity being approximately 0.7. Conclusion The Saudi Diabetes Risk Score is a simple tool that can effectively distinguish Saudis at high risk of dysglycemia.
  • Langenberg, Claudia; Sharp, Stephen J.; Franks, Paul W.; Scott, Robert A.; Deloukas, Panos; Forouhi, Nita G.; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C.; Hansen, Torben; Palla, Luigi; Pedersen, Oluf; Schulze, Matthias B.; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Wheeler, Eleanor; Agnoli, Claudia; Arriola, Larraitz; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Clarke, Geraldine M.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Duell, Eric J.; Fagherazzi, Guy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kerrison, Nicola D.; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kroeger, Janine; Lajous, Martin; Morris, Andrew P.; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quiros, J. Ramon; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Barroso, Ines; McCarthy, Mark I.; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J. (2014)
  • Castren, Sari; Temcheff, Caroline E.; Derevensky, Jeffrey; Josefsson, Kim; Alho, Hannu; Salonen, Anne H. (2017)
    Empirical evidence has shown that youth gamble on both regulated and unregulated games, despite legislative prohibitions. This study assesses middle and high school teachers' awareness and attitudes regarding adolescent gambling and other potentially high-risk behaviours in Finland. A convenience sample of teachers (N = 157) from 13 provinces participated in the survey. The results suggest that teachers in Finland were more knowledgeable of the age limits of other adolescent high-risk behaviours than the legal age for gambling. Teachers were somewhat familiar with the behaviours and consequences associated with adolescent gambling. All other risk behaviours were perceived as being more important than gambling. Teachers' awareness about gambling prevention material in Finnish schools was limited. Results suggest that initiatives are required to enhance teachers' knowledge of adolescent problem gambling and its harmful short- and long-term consequences. School policies and guidelines including gambling behavior should be implemented in middle and high schools globally.
  • Välimäki, Maritta; Anttila, Katriina; Anttila, Minna; Lahti, Mari (2017)
    Background: Although previous studies on information and communication technology (ICT)-based intervention on mental health among adolescents with depressive symptoms have already been combined in a number of systematic reviews, coherent information is still missing about interventions used, participants' engagement of these interventions, and how these interventions work. Objective: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials to describe the effectiveness of Web-based interventions to support adolescents with depression or depressive symptoms, anxiety, and stress. We also explored the content of the interventions, as there has previously been a lack of coherent understanding of the detailed content of the Web-based interventions for these purposes. Methods: We included parallel randomized controlled trials targeted at adolescents, or young people in the age range of 10 and 24 years, with symptoms or diagnoses of depression and anxiety. The interventions were from original studies aimed to support mental health among adolescents, and they were delivered via Web-based information and communication technology. Results: Out of 2087 records identified, 27 papers (22 studies) met the inclusion criteria. On the basis of a narrative analysis of 22 studies, a variety of Web-based interventions were found; the most commonly used intervention was based on cognitive behavioral therapy. Meta-analysis was further conducted with 15 studies (4979 participants). At the end of the intervention, a statistically significant improvement was found in the intervention group (10 studies) regarding depressive symptoms (P=.02, median 1.68, 95% CI 3.11-0.25) and after 6 months (3 studies; P=.01, median 1.78, 95% CI 3.20-0.37). Anxiety symptoms (8 studies; P Conclusions: Despite widely reported promises that information technology use is beneficial to adolescents with depression, the results of our review show only short-term effects on adolescents' mental well-being, whereas long-term effects remain questionable because of the limited number of studies reviewed. Information about the economic benefits of Web-based interventions is still lacking. The quality of the studies, especially biases related to attrition rates and selective reporting, still needs serious attention.