Browsing by Subject "PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY"

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  • Tian, Xianglin; Minunno, Francesco; Cao, Tianjian; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Mäkelä, Annikki (2020)
    Abstract Applications of ecosystem flux models on large geographical scales are often limited by model complexity and data availability. Here, we calibrated and evaluated a semi-empirical ecosystem flux model, PRELES, for various forest types and climate conditions, based on eddy covariance data from 55 sites. A Bayesian approach was adopted for model calibration and uncertainty quantification. We applied the site-specific calibrations and multisite calibrations to nine plant functional types (PFTs) to obtain the site-specific and PFT specific parameter vectors for PRELES. A systematically designed cross-validation was implemented to evaluate calibration strategies and the risks in extrapolation. The combination of plant physiological traits and climate patterns generated significant variation in vegetation responses and model parameters across but not within PFTs, implying that applying the model without PFT-specific parameters is risky. But within PFT, the multisite calibrations performed as accurately as the site-specific calibrations in predicting gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). Moreover, the variations among sites within one PFT could be effectively simulated by simply adjusting the parameter of potential light-use efficiency (LUE), implying significant convergence of simulated vegetation processes within PFT. The hierarchical modelling of PRELES provides a compromise between satellite-driven LUE and physiologically oriented approaches for extrapolating the geographical variation of ecosystem productivity. Although measurement errors of eddy covariance and remotely sensed data propagated a substantial proportion of uncertainty or potential biases, the results illustrated that PRELES could reliably capture daily variations of GPP and ET for contrasting forest types on large geographical scales if PFT-specific parameterizations were applied.
  • Roth, Florian; Karcher, Denis B.; Radecker, Nils; Hohn, Sonke; Carvalho, Susana; Thomson, Timothy; Saalmann, Franziska; Voolstra, Christian R.; Kurten, Benjamin; Struck, Ulrich; Jones, Burton H.; Wild, Christian (2020)
    Following coral mortality in tropical reefs, pioneer communities dominated by filamentous and crustose algae efficiently colonize substrates previously occupied by coral tissue. This phenomenon is particularly common after mass coral mortality following prolonged bleaching events associated with marine heatwaves. Pioneer communities play an important role for the biological succession and reorganization of reefs after disturbance. However, their significance for critical ecosystem functions previously mediated by corals, such as the efficient cycling of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) within the reef, remains uncertain. We used 96 carbonate tiles to simulate the occurrence of bare substrates after disturbance in a coral reef of the central Red Sea. We measured rates of C and dinitrogen (N-2) fixation of pioneer communities on these tiles monthly over an entire year. Coupled with elemental and stable isotope analyses, these measurements provide insights into macronutrient acquisition, export and the influence of seasonality. Pioneer communities exhibited high rates of C and N(2)fixation within 4-8 weeks after the introduction of experimental bare substrates. Ranging from 13 to 25 mu mol C cm(-2) day(-1)and 8 to 54 nmol N cm(-2) day(-1), respectively, C and N(2)fixation rates were comparable to reported values for established Red Sea coral reefs. This similarity indicates that pioneer communities may quickly compensate for the loss of benthic productivity by corals. Notably, between 40% and 85% of fixed organic C was exported into the environment, constituting a vital source of energy for the coral reef food web. Our findings suggest that benthic pioneer communities may play a crucial, yet overlooked role in the C and N dynamics of oligotrophic coral reefs by contributing to the input of new C and N after coral mortality. While not substituting other critical ecosystem functions provided by corals (e.g. structural habitat complexity and coastal protection), pioneer communities likely contribute to maintaining coral reef nutrient cycling through the accumulation of biomass and import of macronutrients following coral loss. A freePlain Language Summarycan be found within the Supporting Information of this article.
  • Li, T.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Q.; Lu, Y.; Wang, G.; Niu, Z.; Raivonen, M.; Vesala, T. (2015)
    Natural wetlands are among the most important sources of atmospheric methane and thus important for better understanding the long-term temporal variations in the atmospheric methane concentration. During the last 60 years, wetlands have experienced extensive conversion and impacts from climate warming which might result in complicated temporal and spatial variations in the changes of the wetland methane emissions. In this paper, we present a modeling framework, integrating CH4MODwetland, TOPMODEL, and TEM models, to analyze the temporal and spatial variations in CH4 emissions from natural wetlands (including inland marshes/swamps, coastal wetlands, lakes, and rivers) in China. Our analysis revealed a total increase of 25.5 %, averaging 0.52 gm(-2) per decade, in the national CH4 fluxes from 1950 to 2010, which was mainly induced by climate warming. Larger CH4 flux increases occurred in northeastern, northern, and northwestern China, where there have been higher temperature rises. However, decreases in precipitation due to climate warming offset the increment of CH4 fluxes in these regions. The CH4 fluxes from the wetland on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau exhibited the lowest CH4 increase (0.17 gm(-2) per decade). Although climate warming has accelerated CH4 fluxes, the total amount of national CH4 emissions decreased by approximately 2.35 Tg (1.91-2.81 Tg), i.e., from 4.50 Tg in the early 1950s to 2.15 Tg in the late 2000s, due to the wetland loss totalling 17.0 million ha. Of this reduction, 0.26 Tg (0.24-0.28 Tg) was derived from lakes and rivers, 0.16 Tg (0.13-0.20 Tg) from coastal wetlands, and 1.92 Tg (1.54-2.33 Tg) from inland wetlands. Spatially, northeastern China contributed the most to the total reduction, with a loss of 1.68 Tg. The wetland CH4 emissions reduced by more than half in most regions in China except for the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, where the CH4 decrease was only 23.3 %.
  • Saunders, Matthew; Dengel, Sigrid; Kolari, Pasi; Moureaux, Christine; Montagnani, Leonardo; Ceschia, Eric; Altimir, Nuria; Lopez-Ballesteros, Ana; Maranon-Jimenez, Sara; Acosta, Manuel; Klumpp, Katja; Gielen, Bert; Op de Beeck, Maarten; Hortnagl, Lukas; Merbold, Lutz; Osborne, Bruce; Grunwald, Thomas; Arrouays, Dominique; Boukir, Hakima; Saby, Nicolas; Nicolini, Giacomo; Papale, Dario; Jones, Michael (2018)
    There are many factors that influence ecosystem scale carbon, nitrogen and greenhouse gas dynamics, including the inherent heterogeneity of soils and vegetation, anthropogenic management interventions, and biotic and abiotic disturbance events. It is important therefore, to document the characteristics of the soils and vegetation and to accurately report all management activities, and disturbance events to aid the interpretation of collected data, and to determine whether the ecosystem either amplifies or mitigates climate change. This paper outlines the importance of assessing both the spatial and temporal variability of soils and vegetation and to report all management events, the import or export of C or N from the ecosystem, and the occurrence of biotic/abiotic disturbances at ecosystem stations of the Integrated Carbon Observation System, a pan-European research infrastructure.
  • Savi, Flavia; Nemitz, Eiko; Coyle, Mhairi; Aitkenhead, Matt; Frumau, Kfa; Gerosa, Giacomo; Finco, Angelo; Gruening, Carten; Goded, Ignacio; Loubet, Benjamin; Stella, Patrick; Ruuskanen, Taina; Weidinger, T.; Horvath, L.; Zenone, Terenzio; Fares, Silvano (2020)
    Tropospheric ozone (O-3) is probably the air pollutant most damaging to vegetation. Understanding how plants respond to O(3)pollution under different climate conditions is of central importance for predicting the interactions between climate change, ozone impact and vegetation. This work analyses the effect of O(3)fluxes on net ecosystem productivity (NEP), measured directly at the ecosystem level with the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The relationship was explored with artificial neural networks (ANNs), which were used to model NEP using environmental and phenological variables as inputs in addition to stomatal O(3)uptake in Spring and Summer, when O(3)pollution is expected to be highest. A sensitivity analysis allowed us to isolate the effect of O-3, visualize the shape of the O-3-NEP functional relationship and explore how climatic variables affect NEP response to O-3. This approach has been applied to eleven ecosystems covering a range of climatic areas. The analysis highlighted that O(3)effects over NEP are highly non-linear and site-specific. A significant but small NEP reduction was found during Spring in a Scottish shrubland (-0.67%), in two Italian forests (up to -1.37%) and during Summer in a Californian orange orchard (-1.25%). Although the overall seasonal effect of O(3)on NEP was not found to be negative for the other sites, with episodic O(3)detrimental effect still identified. These episodes were correlated with meteorological variables showing that O(3)damage depends on weather conditions. By identifying O(3)damage under field conditions and the environmental factors influencing to that damage, this work provides an insight into O(3)pollution, climate and weather conditions.
  • Karcher, Denis B.; Roth, Florian; Carvalho, Susana; El-Khaled, Yusuf C.; Tilstra, Arjen; Kürten, Benjamin; Struck, Ulrich; Jones, Burton H.; Wild, Christian (2020)
    While various sources increasingly release nutrients to the Red Sea, knowledge about their effects on benthic coral reef communities is scarce. Here, we provide the first comparative assessment of the response of all major benthic groups (hard and soft corals, turf algae and reef sands-together accounting for 80% of the benthic reef community) to in-situ eutrophication in a central Red Sea coral reef. For 8 weeks, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were experimentally increased 3-fold above environmental background concentrations around natural benthic reef communities using a slow release fertilizer with 15% total nitrogen (N) content. We investigated which major functional groups took up the available N, and how this changed organic carbon (C-org) and N contents using elemental and stable isotope measurements. Findings revealed that hard corals (in their tissue), soft corals and turf algae incorporated fertilizer N as indicated by significant increases in delta N-15 by 8%, 27% and 28%, respectively. Among the investigated groups, C-org content significantly increased in sediments (+24%) and in turf algae (+33%). Altogether, this suggests that among the benthic organisms only turf algae were limited by N availability and thus benefited most from N addition. Thereby, based on higher C-org content, turf algae potentially gained competitive advantage over, for example, hard corals. Local management should, thus, particularly address DIN eutrophication by coastal development and consider the role of turf algae as potential bioindicator for eutrophication.
  • Fransner, Filippa; Gustafsson, Erik; Tedesco, Letizia; Vichi, Marcello; Hordoir, Robinson; Roquet, Fabien; Spilling, Kristian; Kuznetsov, Ivan; Eilola, Kari; Morth, Carl-Magnus; Humborg, Christoph; Nycander, Jonas (2018)
    High inputs of nutrients and organic matter make coastal seas places of intense air-sea CO2 exchange. Due to their complexity, the role of coastal seas in the global air-sea CO2 exchange is, however, still uncertain. Here, we investigate the role of phytoplankton stoichiometric flexibility and extracellular DOC production for the seasonal nutrient and CO2 partial pressure (pCO(2)) dynamics in the Gulf of Bothnia, Northern Baltic Sea. A 3-D ocean biogeochemical-physical model with variable phytoplankton stoichiometry is for the first time implemented in the area and validated against observations. By simulating non-Redfieldian internal phytoplankton stoichiometry, and a relatively large production of extracellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the model adequately reproduces observed seasonal cycles in macronutrients and pCO(2). The uptake of atmospheric CO2 is underestimated by 50% if instead using the Redfield ratio to determine the carbon assimilation, as in other Baltic Sea models currently in use. The model further suggests, based on the observed drawdown of pCO(2), that observational estimates of organic carbon production in the Gulf of Bothnia, derived with the 14C method, may be heavily underestimated. We conclude that stoichiometric variability and uncoupling of carbon and nutrient assimilation have to be considered in order to better understand the carbon cycle in coastal seas.
  • Johnson, Matthew D.; Beaudoin, David J.; Laza-Martinez, Aitor; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Fensin, Elizabeth; Lin, Senjie; Merculief, Aaron; Nagai, Satoshi; Pompeu, Mayza; Setälä, Outi; Stoecker, Diane K. (2016)
    Ciliates from the genus Mesodinium are globally distributed in marine and freshwater ecosystems and may possess either heterotrophic or mixotrophic nutritional modes. Members of the Mesodinium major/rubrum species complex photosynthesize by sequestering and maintaining organelles from cryptophyte prey, and under certain conditions form periodic or recurrent blooms (= red tides). Here, we present an analysis of the genetic diversity of Mesodinium and cryptophyte populations from 10 environmental samples (eight globally dispersed habitats including five Mesodinium blooms), using group-specific primers for Mesodinium partial 18S, ITS, and partial 28S rRNA genes as well as cryptophyte large subunit RuBisCO genes (rbcL). In addition, 22 new cryptophyte and four new M, rubrum cultures were used to extract DNA and sequence rbcL and 18S-ITS-28S genes, respectively, in order to provide a stronger phylogenetic context for our environmental sequences. Bloom samples were analyzed from coastal Brazil, Chile, two Northeastern locations in the United States, and the Pribilof Islands within the Bering Sea. Additionally, samples were also analyzed from the Baltic and Barents Seas and coastal California under non-bloom conditions. Most blooms were dominated by a single Mesodinium genotype, with coastal Brazil and Chile blooms composed of M. major and the Eastern USA blooms dominated by M. rubrum variant B. Sequences from all four blooms were dominated by Teleaulax amphioxeia-like cryptophytes. Non bloom communities revealed more diverse assemblages of Mesodiniurn spp., including heterotrophic species and the mixotrophic Mesodinium Chamaeleon. Similarly, cryptophyte diversity was also higher in non-bloom samples. Our results confirm that Mesodinium blooms may be caused by M. major, as well as multiple variants of M, rubrum, and further implicate I amphioxeia as the key cryptophyte species linked to these phenomena in temperate and subtropical regions.
  • Morales-Garcia, Nuria Melisa; Saila, Laura K.; Janis, Christine M. (2020)
    Savanna-like ecosystems were present at high latitudes in North America during much of the Neogene. Present-day African savannas, like the Serengeti, have been proposed to be modern analogs of these paleosavannas, particularly those from the middle Miocene of the Great Plains region of the United States. Both these extant and extinct savannas contain a preponderance of artiodactyl (even-toed ungulate) species; however, the taxonomic composition of each fauna is different. While present-day African savannas are dominated by ruminants (primarily bovids), the Neogene savannas of North America were dominated by a diversity of both camelid and non-bovid ruminant families. This study provides a quantitative test of the similarity of the artiodactyl faunas of the North American Neogene paleosavannas to those of the modern-day African savannas. A correspondence analysis of ecomorphological features revealed considerable overlap between modern and fossil faunas. The morphospace occupation of the extinct North American ruminants falls within that of the African bovids. Some of the extinct camelids also fall within this same morphospace, but many do not, perhaps indicating an environmental difference such as greater aridity in Neogene North America. The diversity and disparity of artiodactyl faunas through the Neogene of North America changed along with changing temperatures and precipitation regimes. The taxonomic and ecomorphological diversity of the Serengeti ruminant fauna is statistically comparable to those North American paleofaunas occurring during or immediately after the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO), but the later, more depauperate faunas are no longer comparable. This study quantitatively analyzes artiodactyl communities as they changed with the cooling and drying trend seen during the Neogene.
  • Franz, Daniela; Acosta, Manuel; Altimir, Nuria; Arriga, Nicola; Arrouays, Dominique; Aubinet, Marc; Aurela, Mika; Ayres, Edward; Lopez-Ballesteros, Ana; Barbaste, Mireille; Berveiller, Daniel; Biraud, Sebastien; Boukir, Hakima; Brown, Timothy; Bruemmer, Christian; Buchmann, Nina; Burba, George; Carrara, Arnaud; Cescatti, Allessandro; Ceschia, Eric; Clement, Robert; Cremonese, Edoardo; Crill, Patrick; Darenova, Eva; Dengel, Sigrid; D'Odorico, Petra; Filippa, Gianluca; Fleck, Stefan; Fratini, Gerardo; Fuss, Roland; Gielen, Bert; Gogo, Sebastien; Grace, John; Graf, Alexander; Grelle, Achim; Gross, Patrick; Gruenwald, Thomas; Haapanala, Sami; Hehn, Markus; Heinesch, Bernard; Heiskanen, Jouni; Herbst, Mathias; Herschlein, Christine; Hortnagl, Lukas; Hufkens, Koen; Ibrom, Andreas; Jolivet, Claudy; Joly, Lilian; Jones, Michael; Kiese, Ralf; Klemedtsson, Leif; Kljun, Natascha; Klumpp, Katja; Kolari, Pasi; Kolle, Olaf; Kowalski, Andrew; Kutsch, Werner; Laurila, Tuomas; de Ligne, Anne; Linder, Sune; Lindroth, Anders; Lohila, Annalea; Longdoz, Bernhard; Mammarella, Ivan; Manise, Tanguy; Maranon Jimenez, Sara; Matteucci, Giorgio; Mauder, Matthias; Meier, Philip; Merbold, Lutz; Mereu, Simone; Metzger, Stefan; Migliavacca, Mirco; Molder, Meelis; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moureaux, Christine; Nelson, David; Nemitz, Eiko; Nicolini, Giacomo; Nilsson, Mats B.; Op de Beeck, Maarten; Osborne, Bruce; Lofvenius, Mikaell Ottosson; Pavelka, Marian; Peichl, Matthias; Peltola, Olli; Pihlatie, Mari; Pitacco, Andrea; Pokorny, Radek; Pumpanen, Jukka; Ratie, Celine; Rebmann, Corinna; Roland, Marilyn; Sabbatini, Simone; Saby, Nicolas P. A.; Saunders, Matthew; Schmid, Hans Peter; Schrumpf, Marion; Sedlak, Pavel; Serrano Ortiz, Penelope; Siebicke, Lukas; Sigut, Ladislav; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Simioni, Guillaume; Skiba, Ute; Sonnentag, Oliver; Soudani, Kamel; Soule, Patrice; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Tallec, Tiphaine; Thimonier, Anne; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Vestin, Patrik; Vincent, Gaelle; Vincke, Caroline; Vitale, Domenico; Waldner, Peter; Weslien, Per; Wingate, Lisa; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Zahniser, Mark; Vesala, Timo (2018)
    Research infrastructures play a key role in launching a new generation of integrated long-term, geographically distributed observation programmes designed to monitor climate change, better understand its impacts on global ecosystems, and evaluate possible mitigation and adaptation strategies. The pan-European Integrated Carbon Observation System combines carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG; CO2, CH4, N2O, H2O) observations within the atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems and oceans. High-precision measurements are obtained using standardised methodologies, are centrally processed and openly available in a traceable and verifiable fashion in combination with detailed metadata. The Integrated Carbon Observation System ecosystem station network aims to sample climate and land-cover variability across Europe. In addition to GHG flux measurements, a large set of complementary data (including management practices, vegetation and soil characteristics) is collected to support the interpretation, spatial upscaling and modelling of observed ecosystem carbon and GHG dynamics. The applied sampling design was developed and formulated in protocols by the scientific community, representing a trade-off between an ideal dataset and practical feasibility. The use of open-access, high-quality and multi-level data products by different user communities is crucial for the Integrated Carbon Observation System in order to achieve its scientific potential and societal value.
  • Collalti, A.; Marconi, S.; Ibrom, A.; Trotta, C.; Anav, A.; D'Andrea, E.; Matteucci, G.; Montagnani, L.; Gielen, B.; Mammarella, I.; Gruenwald, T.; Knohl, A.; Berninger, F.; Zhao, Y.; Valentini, R.; Santini, M. (2016)
    This study evaluates the performances of the new version (v.5.1) of 3D-CMCC Forest Ecosystem Model (FEM) in simulating gross primary productivity (GPP), against eddy covariance GPP data for 10 FLUXNET forest sites across Europe. A new carbon allocation module, coupled with new both phenological and autotrophic respiration schemes, was implemented in this new daily version. Model ability in reproducing timing and magnitude of daily and monthly GPP fluctuations is validated at intra-annual and inter-annual scale, including extreme anomalous seasons. With the purpose to test the 3D-CMCC FEM applicability over Europe without a site-related calibration, the model has been deliberately parametrized with a single set of species-specific parametrizations for each forest ecosystem. The model consistently reproduces both in timing and in magnitude daily and monthly GPP variability across all sites, with the exception of the two Mediterranean sites. We find that 3D-CMCC FEM tends to better simulate the timing of inter-annual anomalies than their magnitude within measurements' uncertainty. In six of eight sites where data are available, the model well reproduces the 2003 summer drought event. Finally, for three sites we evaluate whether a more accurate representation of forest structural characteristics (i.e. cohorts, forest layers) and species composition can improve model results. In two of the three sites results reveal that model slightly increases its performances although, statistically speaking, not in a relevant way.