Browsing by Subject "PROFESSION"

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  • Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Meretoja, Riitta (2015)
    Background: Nursing practice takes place in a social framework, in which environmental elements and interpersonal relations interact. Ethical climate of the work unit is an important element affecting nurses' professional and ethical practice. Nevertheless, whatever the environmental circumstances, nurses are expected to be professionally competent providing high-quality care ethically and clinically. Aim: This study examined newly graduated nurses' perception of the ethical climate of their work environment and its association with their self-assessed professional competence, turnover intentions and job satisfaction. Method: Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational research design was applied. Participants consisted of 318 newly graduated nurses. Data were collected electronically and analysed statistically. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval and permissions to use instruments and conduct the study were obtained according to required procedures. Data were rendered anonymous to protect participant confidentiality. Completing the questionnaire was interpreted as consent to participate. Findings: Nurses' overall perception of the ethical climate was positive. More positive perceptions related to peers, patients and physicians, and less positive to hospitals and managers. Strong associations were found between perceived ethical climate and self-assessed competence, turnover intentions in terms of changing job, and job satisfaction in terms of quality of care. Nurses at a higher competence level with positive views of job satisfaction and low turnover intentions perceived the climate significantly more positively. Conclusion: Nursing management responsible for and having the power to implement changes should understand their contribution in ethical leadership, as well as the multidimensional nature of nurses' work environment and the interaction between work-related factors in planning developmental measures. Future research should focus on issues in nurse managers' ethical leadership in creating ethical work environments. There is also a need for knowledge of newly graduated nurses' views of factors which act as enhancers or barriers to positive ethical climates to develop. Interventions, continuing education courses, and discussions designed to promote positive ethical climates should be developed for managers, nurses, and multi-professional teams.
  • Kaihlanen, Anu-Marja; Elovainio, Marko; Haavisto, Elina; Salminen, Leena; Sinervo, Timo (2020)
    Background The shortage of nurses is a global issue, and turnover rates are especially high for newly graduated nurses. The transition from student to nurse is often described as challenging, and the final clinical practicum before graduation is suggested to be important in preparing graduating students for the transition. However, little is known about the actual relationships between the final clinical practicum, transition and turnover intentions. Objectives To examine whether the final clinical practicum experience is associated with the transition experience and turnover intentions of newly graduated nurses, and whether the transition experience mediates the potential relationship between the practicum and turnover intentions. Design Cross-sectional survey study. Settings The study was carried out in Finland (October–December 2018). Participants Registered nurses graduated within the past two years (n = 712). Methods A new survey instrument with five subscales was developed for measuring the final clinical practicum experience. Transition experience was measured on four scales that demonstrated the emotional, physical, socio-developmental and intellectual domains of the transition: Psychological distress, sleep quality, role conflict/ambiguity, perception of transition and educational preparation. Turnover intentions from job and profession were asked about with two questions. Structural equation modelling was used to explore the associations between the variables. The models were adjusted for multiple potential confounders. Results Final clinical practicum experience was associated with all domains of the transition experience and turnover intentions. The association between the practicum and turnover intentions was partly mediated by the emotional (psychological distress) and socio-developmental (role conflict and ambiguity) domains of the transition. Conclusions Our findings provide new evidence about the associations between the specific final clinical practicum dimensions and turnover intentions and the specific mechanisms linking this association. These results highlight the importance of final clinical practicums and suggest targets for improving nurses' transition processes during their first years in practice.